So annoyed/offended right now - page 3

As you all know, I have been dealing with a very difficult, non-compliant mother of a Type 1 diabetic. He was finally able to start school yesterday, but there are a lot of issues going on. Mom is... Read More

  1. by   WineRN
    Quote from SeasonedOne
    Nurses have an extensive amount of knowledge. We know what will happen when our patients or those caring for them fail or make less than optimal choices. We want them to avoid those. However, the reality is nurses can't change choices, only influence them when and if people are willing to listen, consider and then change actions. This is tough on our hearts especially when children are involved. In the end, we need to: Foster trust without judgement; Be willing to let our patients/caregivers fail; Be open to allowing them to progress and learn at their pace; Evaluate and cooperatively plan how to make their reality better on their terms; and while knowing the potential negative outcomes, revel in the improvements, no matter how small, when they occur.
    This is wonderful. I feel like we all struggle with giving certain families all of the information on how to succeed but then get frustrated when they just ignore it or don't take it in.

    But failure with a type 1 diabetic can be a VERY SERIOUS thing. It's not just a document the failure and hope we learn from it event. And as a school nurse, we try to keep the safest environment possible for all of our students. Medical neglect is an unfortunate but real thing we need to keep an eye out for and report on if necessary.
  2. by   scuba nurse
    I totally get the frustration! I hate that people think I just give out band aids all day, it pisses me off!!

    Anyway, what does your principal think? Why does this child have to come to your school, when there is one closer to him? In my district, (in MA) this would not fly at all, (and my principal would NOT tolerate this, she would be on the phone complaining in a second) (she is good at it!) they would make him go to the closer school, even if he has a 504 and needs transportation that doesn't mean he (the parents) can pick the school he goes to. I think it is time to get the administration involved and see about him going to the school closer to him. I cannot see a good outcome for him, that is too long a day for a 6 year old! Something will happen on the bus at some point, and it is not safe.
  3. by   kidzcare
    Quote from scuba nurse
    Why does this child have to come to your school, when there is one closer to him?
    I was thinking that too! What is the reason that he is bussed so far?
  4. by   MHDNURSE
    Quote from kidzcare
    I was thinking that too! What is the reason that he is bussed so far?
    We are a charter school in an urban area with otherwise extremely underperforming schools. He applied and got in via lottery so she wants him to come here.
  5. by   MHDNURSE
    Quote from scuba nurse
    I totally get the frustration! I hate that people think I just give out band aids all day, it pisses me off!!

    Anyway, what does your principal think? Why does this child have to come to your school, when there is one closer to him? In my district, (in MA) this would not fly at all, (and my principal would NOT tolerate this, she would be on the phone complaining in a second) (she is good at it!) they would make him go to the closer school, even if he has a 504 and needs transportation that doesn't mean he (the parents) can pick the school he goes to. I think it is time to get the administration involved and see about him going to the school closer to him. I cannot see a good outcome for him, that is too long a day for a 6 year old! Something will happen on the bus at some point, and it is not safe.
    It's funny b/c I was thinking that the fact that our school does not have a FT nurse, nor is there anyone to give him glucagon after 1:30 pm would be reasons he should not come, but we are being told that that is discrimination b/c of his disability and that we need to accommodate for him. We are in MA too.
  6. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from MHDNURSE
    It's funny b/c I was thinking that the fact that our school does not have a FT nurse, nor is there anyone to give him glucagon after 1:30 pm would be reasons he should not come, but we are being told that that is discrimination b/c of his disability and that we need to accommodate for him. We are in MA too.
    It technically is. It was a case like this, though not exactly, that made my school invest in full time nurses. I cover the entire school day and at least 1 hour after school.
  7. by   Kooky Korky
    Frustrated I understand, offended not really. She is not doing this to you personally is she?
    You are doing your work, which you are hired and paid to do.

    Maybe it's going to take a visit from CPS to get this mother to open her eyes. Single, chronically ill kid, too bad.
    Many people are in the same boat. Time for her to shake off her issues, whatever they are and get with it for
    her son's sake. If she is allowing the type of diet you describe, that right there is abuse. And maybe CPS can
    require her to get counseling or whatever intervention will help her and the boy.

    So you do what you have to do, document every failure on Mom's part, and pick up the phone and call CPS if
    it has come down to that.

    Use all of your resources, including Administration.

    Has the boy had a dietician's teaching? Not just one class. Has he been to diabetic summer camp? He can learn
    a lot there and meet other kids with DM and learn how they handle it.
  8. by   WineRN
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Has he been to diabetic summer camp? He can learn
    a lot there and meet other kids with DM and learn how they handle it.
    We applied for a grant to send my type 1 student over the summer and she LOVED it. She learned how to count her own carbs, and why we don't always want to depend on insulin to make up for poor diet choices.

    But based on what the OP has said, it doesn't sound like the student or family has had enough education yet.
  9. by   kidzcare
    Quote from WineRN
    We applied for a grant to send my type 1 student over the summer and she LOVED it. She learned how to count her own carbs, and why we don't always want to depend on insulin to make up for poor diet choices.
    This is awesome!!
  10. by   JenTheSchoolRN
    Quote from WineRN
    We applied for a grant to send my type 1 student over the summer and she LOVED it. She learned how to count her own carbs, and why we don't always want to depend on insulin to make up for poor diet choices.

    But based on what the OP has said, it doesn't sound like the student or family has had enough education yet.
    Diabetes camp is the best! I have one student that goes every year and just loves it. Next year, she will transition into being a counselor.

    And carb counting is a large part of the battle. My one student that went to camp loves her carbs and sat down there with a nutritionist to help balance her carb-y meals a bit more. Granted this student is now a high schooler and the carb-counting didn't hit home for her until she was in middle school.

    6 years old is really young to expect a diabetic to be fully independent (but no too young for camp!). There are some great resources (free even) in some areas to give to parents to help with their own education on there child's needs.
  11. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Jen-Elizabeth
    Diabetes camp is the best! I have one student that goes every year and just loves it. Next year, she will transition into being a counselor.

    And carb counting is a large part of the battle. My one student that went to camp loves her carbs and sat down there with a nutritionist to help balance her carb-y meals a bit more. Granted this student is now a high schooler and the carb-counting didn't hit home for her until she was in middle school.

    6 years old is really young to expect a diabetic to be fully independent (but no too young for camp!). There are some great resources (free even) in some areas to give to parents to help with their own education on there child's needs.
    Maybe Mom could somehow get in on the teaching, too.

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