Oh please, just let me vent!!! - page 4

OK, teachers. I would like to clarify a few things for you. #1. I cannot cure hiccups. Why are you sending the student to me? Ditto for a cut that happened a week ago at home, a sunburn from a... Read More

  1. by   NutmeggeRN
    I think it is becasue we do not only manage daytime illness/injuries

    we manage food needs, clothing needs, bathing needs, psych needs
    we manage state mandated screenings and reports
    we manage epileptic seizures, diabetic pump failures, anaphalactic reactions
    we manage
  2. by   Tinker88
    LET ME VENT WITH YOU...

    Someone earlier said it's miscommunication within the school. I completely agree. I taught for a few years in the elementary setting. It seems schools nowadays are too focused on standardized tests. Allow me to explain. The state puts pressure on every school system to increase advanced/proficient percentages. The school system then puts that pressure on the principals. The principals put the same pressure on the teachers. It's like a pyramid. What are you left with? Craziness and people running around all year as if their are heads cut off. In my state, teachers are about to start getting paid based on how students perform on tests and evaluations (not years of service or level of education). That puts a lot more pressure on teachers. When you have stressed teachers, they send kids out of the room to "you" because they don't find the time to handle it themselves. They have a schedule and curriculum to follow.

    I went into teaching to inspire kids and show them how to use their imaginations to learn about the world around them. I learned quite quickly that the fantasy I had about teaching was baloney. I ended up not having time to do many fun educational crafts and was stuck teaching TCAP skills and training students how to take multiple choice questions! Oh and all the paper work, graded papers, IEP documentations, and a lot of other things that kept me up late at night and over the weekend.

    I completely understand why school nurses get upset when teachers send kids to the office for silly things. They have things to take care of and paper work to deal with too. I know at my school we had one nurse. Usually that nurse spends most of her time assisting the SPED department. There she helps students with feeding tubes and much more. I wouldn't blame teachers in general, but I have met some without common sense...it's no denying that some people lack it! LOL. I kept bandaids in my class and if a kid threw up...I CALLED MOM and had the janitor clean it up. Yes it took instruction time from my 20 kids, but stuff happens.

    As a teacher, I wasn't given a policy to follow for students seeing the nurse, and I bet a lot of other schools don't have one either. Just saying... it's miscommunication and people not understanding each other. Both teachers and nurses have tough jobs and great responsibility. Bless both professions! Let me share that I have just resigned from my teaching position to work on my BSN at a private university. I begin the program this fall. I admire teachers and nurses. Hopefully I can one day find a way to integrate the two. Maybe you could make suggestions to the principal at your school. I hope everything gets better for you! Thanks for sharing your vent and thanks for your dedication as a school nurse! Bless you!
  3. by   mc3
    Quote from Tinker88
    LET ME VENT WITH YOU...

    Someone earlier said it's miscommunication within the school. I completely agree. I taught for a few years in the elementary setting. It seems schools nowadays are too focused on standardized tests. Allow me to explain. The state puts pressure on every school system to increase advanced/proficient percentages. The school system then puts that pressure on the principals. The principals put the same pressure on the teachers. It's like a pyramid. What are you left with? Craziness and people running around all year as if their are heads cut off. In my state, teachers are about to start getting paid based on how students perform on tests and evaluations (not years of service or level of education). That puts a lot more pressure on teachers. When you have stressed teachers, they send kids out of the room to "you" because they don't find the time to handle it themselves. They have a schedule and curriculum to follow.

    I went into teaching to inspire kids and show them how to use their imaginations to learn about the world around them. I learned quite quickly that the fantasy I had about teaching was baloney. I ended up not having time to do many fun educational crafts and was stuck teaching TCAP skills and training students how to take multiple choice questions! Oh and all the paper work, graded papers, IEP documentations, and a lot of other things that kept me up late at night and over the weekend.

    I completely understand why school nurses get upset when teachers send kids to the office for silly things. They have things to take care of and paper work to deal with too. I know at my school we had one nurse. Usually that nurse spends most of her time assisting the SPED department. There she helps students with feeding tubes and much more. I wouldn't blame teachers in general, but I have met some without common sense...it's no denying that some people lack it! LOL. I kept bandaids in my class and if a kid threw up...I CALLED MOM and had the janitor clean it up. Yes it took instruction time from my 20 kids, but stuff happens.

    As a teacher, I wasn't given a policy to follow for students seeing the nurse, and I bet a lot of other schools don't have one either. Just saying... it's miscommunication and people not understanding each other. Both teachers and nurses have tough jobs and great responsibility. Bless both professions! Let me share that I have just resigned from my teaching position to work on my BSN at a private university. I begin the program this fall. I admire teachers and nurses. Hopefully I can one day find a way to integrate the two. Maybe you could make suggestions to the principal at your school. I hope everything gets better for you! Thanks for sharing your vent and thanks for your dedication as a school nurse! Bless you!
    That's so true about everyone running around like chickens with their heads cut off.....I really do believe that, at least for my school, that we all need to understand each other. Nobody, and I mean nobody, has it easy whatsoever in my school. I see what the teachers are going through, and their expectations, and I'm amazed every day they even want to continue to want to teach. However, I would like the same respect back from the teachers. Sending kids up for hiccups, teeth that hurt because they're loose and a million other silly things wastes my time, and takes away from the kids that really need help.
    Again, thank you for letting me vent. It's a relief to know I'm not the only one who feels that way!

    mc3
  4. by   mc3
    Quote from nhnursie
    I think it is becasue we do not only manage daytime illness/injuries

    we manage food needs, clothing needs, bathing needs, psych needs
    we manage state mandated screenings and reports
    we manage epileptic seizures, diabetic pump failures, anaphalactic reactions
    we manage
    Yes, yes and yes!!!!!

    mc3
  5. by   MotherRN
    Quote from OldDude
    One more one more! There is no school board policy prohibiting body odor; it's not against school policy for a child to stink.
    I haven't been in school nursing long or nursing in general, for that matter, and I am only a sub- but, I have already had a child brought to me ( an hispanic, English as a second language student) and the teacher humiliated him by telling me to change his clothes and clean him up.

    I do think the teachers see the school nurse as a dumping ground- "we" are there to support "them". Now, i agree with this in theory- yes, the nurse is there to support the goal of education and keep the kids healthy and safely in the school. But, we are limited in what we can do, and often really busy, just as they are, so they should use common sense in what they send kids in for.

    I subbed in a middle school where a teacher summoned me to his room (which it took me three trys to find). Once I did the man was red-faced and livid. He demanded to know why I had send an hyperactive kid back to his class with a rash on his hand.

    Okay, the kids had a small rash of unknown origin. I have confirmed with an outside doctor that if it isn't round, it isn't ring worm. Now, according to policy, even if it were ring worm, in junior high he could stay in the class if he 1) kept his hands to himself or 2) kept it covered (and that was not even a requirement). Even so, I put a bandaid on it. The teacher demanded gloves, then demanded removal of the student all together. And, as I stood outside his door, he demanded I tell him what the rash was, if not ring worm.

    I professionally explained we are nurses and we don't diagnose. I also had brought the policy of the state with me for him to read, which he refused. He told me to take the kid to the nurses office for the rest of the day.

    There was no way that hyper kids was going to sit in my office, not sick, and pester the #### out of me for the next four hours! The office let him sit in the lobby for the next half hour, then luckily he got to change class to a new instructor...who promptly showed up in the nurses office demanding to know why this kids was now in her room and if he was contagious...

    I haven't accepted another assignment at that school since!
  6. by   MotherRN
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    Don't you all get a week off every few months and the entire summer off? Seems fair compensation for dealing with a few pesky people.
    I believe the time off is more like some at Thanksgiving, Christmas and then Easter break, but the school year is still 9+ months. And, that M-F is grueling at times, I'm sure.

    I have been weighing the benefits of the steady schedule and time off against my desire to not do the same thing 5 days a week and my personal leg swelling issue with desk work.

    But, I like it a few times a week. My hats off to those who do it year round. I may join you in the future!
  7. by   MotherRN
    Quote from NY_teach
    Stuff they teach us in Ed school:

    Pass the buck
    CYA
    RND Syndrome (RN do something!)


    Just graduated now I offer 1 stop shopping. Education and nursing in the same classroom!
    What's CYA?
  8. by   MotherRN
    Quote from BerryHappy
    OMG you all have SAVED me from my misguided dreams of school nursing!!! I can barely tolerate my own whiny lying teenagers, WHY would I think I would be able to tolerate someone else's?!!! Thanks for your VENT!!!
    I told my kids just this afternoon when I got home from the elementary school how interesting it is to meet other peoples kids. We all are so different in our beliefs and ways! Some of the kids are really neat and impressive; but some of the kids are so strange! Then again, the nurse is seeing the kids on meds,a nd I'm not talking about the asthma PRN kids! I had this one today, totally noncompliant. They send him to me and insist I inspect his mouth to be sure he actually swallowed the pill. I tried, he kept turning away. Three different times, he "faked" swallowing the pill. Finally, he refused to be checked (I think it was hidden in behind his front lower lip. But, he wanted his usual candy reward. When I said no I practically had to wrestle him away from the cabinet because he was going for it anyway. Crazy! Was thrilled when he came back for a second dose around noon!

    These kids don't have the right to refuse, like adults do, do they?

    Also, is it a violation to fax a med pick up form to a parent's place of work, if they request it, because they can't come back to sign in person? They signed a handwritten sheet about the student and meds picked up , but I couldn't find the right sheet until after they left. Was this a FERPA violation??
  9. by   MotherRN
    Quote from PrayeRNurse
    WOW! I am a new BSN grad and no acute care will hire a new grad in my area. I just accepted a school nurse job and was excited! You all are scaring me! Ok I understand it is the end of the year. Thank you for your prospective! I will post next May to see if i join the "need to vent team" Not saying you should not feel like it, I just still have the new grad save the world mentality!

    One question, did school nursing experience help you get into acute care?
    I don't believe you can get into the hospital easily from school nursing. unfortunately there is this "school nurses aren't really nurses" crap that goes around. But you will see that you do the whole nursing judgement and run your own show. It uses lots of higher level management skills as well. Plus, there are times for epi pens and diastat, diabetes management and also staff (adult) issues.

    I was just hired into a LTC/ Post Acute Care facility to learn my nursing procedures, pay my dues. They know I am a newer nurse.

    You could pick up some part time.PRN work in a LTC/rehab/post acute care probably easily with a BSN. It's tough work, no precepting really. But, if you survive, that may be enough of a start to get you into acute care eventually.

    I plan to work PRN at my post acute care and still sub days at the schools. Eventually, if my issues resolve, I may take a full time school nurse job when one opens. The field restored my faith in nurisng. It was like a breath of fresh air compared to my first nursing job in LTC last year. And, I find the nursing team in the district is not at all like the lateral violence between nurses in facilities at times.
  10. by   kakamegamama
    "What's CYA? "

    I think it probably stands for "Cover your assparagus" .

    Ah, yes, the OP's post reminded me of my year as a school nurse. I was shared between a middle and high school, in an affluent school district (except, it seemed, when it came to having enough nurse coverage for their schools). I had a wonderful aide who would be at whichever school I wasn't. So, one week I was M-W-F at the middle school, T, Th at the high school, then switched the next week, back and forth. Thankfully our population was in pretty decent health other than a couple of diabetics who were typically physiologically controlled (psychologically, not so much so, but their IDM diseases were). Anyway, I was called to the principal's office one day at the middle school and lectured because I wasn't there every day of the week and I needed to do something about that. Since I couldn't quite figure out how to be in both places at once, I referred her to my boss. I don't think we were very popular.......
  11. by   KelRN215
    Quote from PrayeRNurse
    One question, did school nursing experience help you get into acute care?
    I gather that the majority of people go the other way... start out in acute care and transition into school. Schools in my area do not hire nurses with no acute care experience.
  12. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from MotherRN
    What's CYA?
    Cover yer azz
  13. by   Flare
    Quote from MotherRN
    I told my kids just this afternoon when I got home from the elementary school how interesting it is to meet other peoples kids. We all are so different in our beliefs and ways! Some of the kids are really neat and impressive; but some of the kids are so strange! Then again, the nurse is seeing the kids on meds,a nd I'm not talking about the asthma PRN kids! I had this one today, totally noncompliant. They send him to me and insist I inspect his mouth to be sure he actually swallowed the pill. I tried, he kept turning away. Three different times, he "faked" swallowing the pill. Finally, he refused to be checked (I think it was hidden in behind his front lower lip. But, he wanted his usual candy reward. When I said no I practically had to wrestle him away from the cabinet because he was going for it anyway. Crazy! Was thrilled when he came back for a second dose around noon!

    These kids don't have the right to refuse, like adults do, do they?

    Also, is it a violation to fax a med pick up form to a parent's place of work, if they request it, because they can't come back to sign in person? They signed a handwritten sheet about the student and meds picked up , but I couldn't find the right sheet until after they left. Was this a FERPA violation??
    hmmm... i feel like we almost need a whole new thread for this one...
    anyhow here goes, how old is this kiddo? and are they classified as special ed or diagnosed with any disorders that may contribute to their behavior? The mention of a candy reward makes me think somewhere on the autistic spectrum, but that is just outsider speculation.
    The kids are minors con legally can they refuse, i suppose not, if their parent wants them to take a medication. But I know that I am not going to physically hold down a child to take a medication unless it is a matter of life and limb (such as an epipen). Anything else, in my past experiences if we've been having issues with complicance, is worked out with a strict behavior plan and solid communication with the parent. Now, that being said it sounds like you give a medication first thing in the morning and again at noon. Can the first thing in the morning med be given at home?

    Now, onto the behavior itself. It sounds like you have a behavior plan on the table. If he knows that he gets the candy reinforcer for taking his medication, then work that in your favor. first of all, if it were me, I would either keep the candy in a locked cabinet so that he was aware that only swallowing the med would result in that cabinet being unlocked (and a check for an empty mouth since he's proven that he cheeks his meds instead of taking them). Second, without knowing any other specifics of this child, let him know that it is utterly inappropriate for any wrestling and disobedience to occur in your office. If your office is anything like mine there are glass jars, scissors, forceps, plenty of things you'd rather not have flying around the room.

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