How to spot fakers and send them to class quickly? - page 2

So I'm trying to get my screenings done since October, especially for the littler ones, but it's hard when I get 30+ kids in my office. I try to keep them from coming down unless it's an... Read More

  1. by   MrNurse(x2)
    My average visit is 2 to 3 minutes. I have my tympanic thermometer right next to me with a fresh cover on it. I immediately take their temp and, if afebrile, tell them to push fluids for respiratory issues or take a bucket if GI. My FF have the routine down, they are pulling their hair away from their ear as they approach me. I am all about keeping butts in the seats.
  2. by   Txschoolrn
    I cannot love this post enough! I thought I was being a meanie. I treat my students like I do my own kids and if you aren't throwing up in my trash can or running a fever, off you go. Sometimes we just don't feel good and that is OK. We ALL have to push through sometimes and missing valuable class time is not an option unless it's a true necessity.
  3. by   Amethya
    So Yesterday was a good day. I did what I said and basically cut down on wait times if the kid doesn't have to wait to talk to their parents. I only had 16 yesterday, without adding the 14 kids I did for screening yesterday.

    Today I had a little one come in because "I can't breathe through my nose" and her whole family is sick. No fever, so off to class she went after telling her to cough in her shirt or in a tissue and to drink lots of water. I called her parents afterwards and LVM because they didn't answer, but I did say she is fine but that's what she was complaining about.
  4. by   Amethya
    Quote from Txschoolrn
    I cannot love this post enough! I thought I was being a meanie. I treat my students like I do my own kids and if you aren't throwing up in my trash can or running a fever, off you go. Sometimes we just don't feel good and that is OK. We ALL have to push through sometimes and missing valuable class time is not an option unless it's a true necessity.
    I know me too! I love these kids like my own too!
  5. by   SchoolNurseTXstyle
    It may seem mean to students, teachers but our job is to keep butts in class. I take the responsibility of teaching students the difference between pain and discomfort seriously. Not everything can or needs to be fixed.
  6. by   ruby_jane
    Quote from SchoolNurseTXstyle
    Not everything can or needs to be fixed.
    This is BEAUTIFUL. Not all is gold that glitters/Not all who wander are lost....not everything can or needs to be fixed. Tolkien and SchoolNurseTXstyle.
  7. by   WineRN
    Quote from SchoolNurseTXstyle
    Not everything can or needs to be fixed.
    I'm not sure if this is a new T-shirt slogan or just a sign I should put on my door.
  8. by   Amethya
    Quote from WineRN
    I'm not sure if this is a new T-shirt slogan or just a sign I should put on my door.
    Both!
  9. by   smudges.blips
    Quote from WineRN
    Lots of little ones don't understand the difference between discomfort and pain, and I feel like it's a part of our jobs to teach them. Maybe that makes me a big meanie.
    I wholeheartedly agree! This is a valuable life lesson- are you not feeling 100% or are you truly ill?

    I have delegated Vaseline out to the teaching staff for chapped lips- all of them have a small container and a supply of q-tips; they were unsure at first but once they saw how it kept kids in class they were all on board. They also have bags of bandaids for paper cuts and other small owies (like the invisible kind). If they aren't seen, then I don't have to document or call

    I do have coloring books- but that is for the rare time I have a sick kid for 1+ waiting for a parent. Our passes have a spot where I can mark "come back in 20 min" if I'm busy, and many of them never do because whatever little ailment there was they have since forgotten about.

    As far as screenings go, can you enlist some parent volunteers or some nursing students from a nearby school? That's what we did and were done in 2 days! It was amazing. Then I just had to take care of the few rescreens or absent kiddos.

    Good luck...
  10. by   Amethya
    Quote from smudges.blips
    I wholeheartedly agree! This is a valuable life lesson- are you not feeling 100% or are you truly ill?

    I have delegated Vaseline out to the teaching staff for chapped lips- all of them have a small container and a supply of q-tips; they were unsure at first but once they saw how it kept kids in class they were all on board. They also have bags of bandaids for paper cuts and other small owies (like the invisible kind). If they aren't seen, then I don't have to document or call

    I do have coloring books- but that is for the rare time I have a sick kid for 1+ waiting for a parent. Our passes have a spot where I can mark "come back in 20 min" if I'm busy, and many of them never do because whatever little ailment there was they have since forgotten about.

    As far as screenings go, can you enlist some parent volunteers or some nursing students from a nearby school? That's what we did and were done in 2 days! It was amazing. Then I just had to take care of the few rescreens or absent kiddos.

    Good luck...
    Oh it's fine. I already got all of Kinder done and the 1st graders are almost done. I already got the rest of the school done, it's just them. I been doing well with visitors in my room so it's not a problem anymore.

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