RN v.s. BSN

  1. RN vs BSN...should be obvious right?

    I'm an adult learner, 2 kids, already have an associate degree in emergency medical science. Street medicine for 7 years, paramedic in level 1 trauma center ED for 2 years. I want to go back for nursing.

    I know most places want a BSN. The hospitals where I live don't require it but want you to start working on it after being hired.

    Option 1: Paramedic - BSN bridge program at large state school near me. Mediocre education per other graduates. Would allow me to test out of some classes due to my current degree and experience. Administration is unorganized (has lost applications, prevented people from graduating on time due to their mistakes, etc etc etc). Would take 2 years-BUT i would have my BSN.

    Option 2: 2 year ADN program at great community college where I obtained my first degree. Excellent instructors, well organized program and hospitals in the area like to hire graduates from this school. High NCLEX pass rates.

    I do have lots of classes that I will need already for my BSN. So if I go ADN route- I hope to do BSN online ASAP. Will it take two years regardless how many classes I have done?

    I just don't know what to do. I want my BSN in roughly the same amount of time (1 semester longer) but I want a good education and an administration that isn't going to mess something up.

    Just need some advice :\

    Thanks.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    Do the ADN. Less headache- and the RN-to-BSN part should not be too taxing.
  4. by   Wuzzie
    And just to clarify "RN" is the license which is granted by a state. "BSN" is a degree. You can have your BSN but not be an RN if you don't pass NCLEX.
  5. by   medicmom26
    Oops. you are correct. I should have put ADN vs BSN. Thanks
  6. by   Purple_Clover
    Quote from medicmom26
    Will it take two years regardless how many classes I have done?
    Yes, most nursing programs (in fact, all that I can think of) have a fixed schedule for nursing classes. You can't take Med Surge II and Med Surge I at the same time to get done faster.

    That being said, you haven't said anything about comparative costs for these programs. Even if you can finish only one semester later to get your BSN, it may be more financially savvy to go the ASN route and then bridge to your BSN, assuming jobs in your area aren't super picky about wanting BSN RNs.

    Most BSN programs are significantly more expensive than ASN programs, not to mention being able to earn an extra 4-6months of a salary by finishing a semester early with an ASN. That along with the cheapness of RN-BSN programs and being able to do them online usually sways my opinion strongly towards ASN programs.
  7. by   HumbleDaughter
    Both med-surge classes at once? I do not recommend this. You need to really soak in all the info and there is PLENTY of it in both classes. Taking both of them at once, in my opinion, is setting yourself up for failure if not in the short-term then in the long-run.
  8. by   Purple_Clover
    Quote from HumbleDaughter
    Both med-surge classes at once? I do not recommend this.
    Quote from Purple_Clover
    You can't take Med Surge II and Med Surge I at the same time
    Oops.
  9. by   FolksBtrippin
    I think you should go for the medic to BSN program unless it costs significantly (a whole lot) more than adding up the adn and bsn programs together.

    My rationale: the folks there will be like you with a similar knowledge base. If you wind up having to repeat classes in the adn program you are likely to feel irritated about it as an adult learner. Unlike a kid fresh out of high school, you don't need the 4 years. And as an adult, you are much more equipped to handle the beaurocratic BS of a big school: losing paperwork, etc. You stay on top of them and you don't become a victim. That's how it goes.

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