How long does it take to get an Associates Degree in Nursing?

  1. 0
    I already have a bachelors degree, however I have not taken any nursing related pre-req classes. So I am thinking of going back, taking the TEAS, and going to a technical school for my ADN.

    Are some technical/vocational schools better than others? Or does it not matter as far as job placement as long as you pass?
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  4. 0
    ADNs are usually 2 years, not including pre-reqs. I had my bachelors when i started, along with almost all of the pre-reqs from my bachelors. Im just about to start my final year, and damn im glad to be there!

    Good luck to you. Don't think too much about it, just do it.
  5. 0
    Quote from wlb06
    ADNs are usually 2 years, not including pre-reqs. I had my bachelors when i started, along with almost all of the pre-reqs from my bachelors. Im just about to start my final year, and damn im glad to be there!

    Good luck to you. Don't think too much about it, just do it.
    I was under the impression that all of the pre-reqs, Chem, Bio, Anatomy, etc were taken during the ADN program..so that's not the case?

    How competitive was getting into your ADN program? Did they take your GPA from your bachelors into consideration?
  6. 0
    Associate programs will take you about 3 years.
    The pre-reqs are taken BEFORE entrance into the program (hence the reason they are PRE-reqs). These help determine eligibility for admission because programs can't let everyone in. Every program is pretty competitive. Generally, the GPA from the pre-reqs is what weighs most heavily on admission.
    The nursing portion of the program itself is 2 years. You can fulfill some co-reqs while in the program, depending on how loaded your semester is.
    If you already have a Bachelors, I's suggest looking into an Accelerated BSN. It may be faster than starting an ASN from scratch.
  7. 0
    It really depends on the program!

    For the ADN program in our city you must complete 5 pre-reqs before applying - Anatomy, Physiology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, and Math. These classes need to have been taken within 5 years and in a certain order as the Anatomy is a Pre-Req for Physiology, Pharmacology, and Microbiology. There are also 5 co-requisite classes that most people usually complete because it helps boost your ranking points which are used when you apply. Normally *most* classes transfer but I found that my language classes, for example, wouldn't apply for my Humanities credit because they were all 3 credit classes and not 4 credit like at my college. Then there is a semester in "arrears" - which means that if you finish your last pre-req semester in the Fall of '09, you apply in Spring of '10 but wouldn't start until the Fall of '10. During this semester in between you take one Nursing skills course. Once accepted the program is 4 Semesters (Fall & Spring). So . . . all totalled the prgram usually takes a minimum of 4 years.

    There are programs out there, I believe, where you can go from having a Bachelor's Degree to a BSN in about 1 year. I've heard the clinical experiences can be quite diluted but it might be worth looking if anything like that exists where you are. The State forums under the "Regional" tab can be a great resource for local information.
  8. 0
    1.5 years on the waiting list.

    2.5 years in the program.

    Research your options, not all programs are the same, however there are national standards for programs. I wouldn't suggest the aforementioned "watered down" clinical program someone mentioned earlier (though I have never heard of such a thing) because clinicals are very important, if not more important than learning the basics from a book. Nursing is about applied process, and for me it was solidified in clinicals.

    Best of luck!

    Tait
  9. 0
    Quote from GeekGirl
    It really depends on the program!

    For the ADN program in our city you must complete 5 pre-reqs before applying - Anatomy, Physiology, Pharmacology, Microbiology, and Math. These classes need to have been taken within 5 years and in a certain order as the Anatomy is a Pre-Req for Physiology, Pharmacology, and Microbiology. There are also 5 co-requisite classes that most people usually complete because it helps boost your ranking points which are used when you apply. Normally *most* classes transfer but I found that my language classes, for example, wouldn't apply for my Humanities credit because they were all 3 credit classes and not 4 credit like at my college. Then there is a semester in "arrears" - which means that if you finish your last pre-req semester in the Fall of '09, you apply in Spring of '10 but wouldn't start until the Fall of '10. During this semester in between you take one Nursing skills course. Once accepted the program is 4 Semesters (Fall & Spring). So . . . all totalled the prgram usually takes a minimum of 4 years.

    There are programs out there, I believe, where you can go from having a Bachelor's Degree to a BSN in about 1 year. I've heard the clinical experiences can be quite diluted but it might be worth looking if anything like that exists where you are. The State forums under the "Regional" tab can be a great resource for local information.
    Where does Chemistry come into the picture? That's not a pre-req?

    I have heard that the BS - BSN accelerated programs are more competitive than the ADNs, so that's why I was thinking of going this route.
  10. 0
    Quote from Tait
    1.5 years on the waiting list.

    2.5 years in the program.

    Research your options, not all programs are the same, however there are national standards for programs. I wouldn't suggest the aforementioned "watered down" clinical program someone mentioned earlier (though I have never heard of such a thing) because clinicals are very important, if not more important than learning the basics from a book. Nursing is about applied process, and for me it was solidified in clinicals.

    Best of luck!

    Tait
    Really 1.5 years on the waiting list?? And this is pretty much everywhere?
  11. 0
    Quote from Ted D
    Really 1.5 years on the waiting list?? And this is pretty much everywhere?
    I think it varies greatly. I came from a equal chance lottery system. 2.5GPA was the minimum for the list and you basically got a number in line. I was 110 when I signed up, and it was fortunate for me that my school had added a night program which forced the list to move at double to speed.

    Tait
  12. 0
    Hi Ted!

    If you already have a bachelor's degree, most people do an accelerated BSN. That is the route I took because it takes less time than getting an ADN. I did the nursing prereqs at a community college and then did a 16 month accelerated BSN program. There are not waiting lists everywhere...it really depends on what area you live in. If you can, go out to each college/university around you and ask to speak to a nursing advisor. They should be able to guide you a little bit. What I can tell you is that the ADN programs around me told me that it would take an extra year to do an ADN, so an accelerated BSN would be the way to go. Good luck!


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