How do I do it? RN-BSN

  1. 0
    I've taken a handful of the classes (all online, very demanding and time consuming) and I feel like I'm learning nothing, it's all busywork and nothing informative at all. I want my BSN because without it, you're looked down upon and getting a job is hard, however, I have no urge to return to bedside nursing and I won't get any more money for having it, so what's the point? It takes up all my free time to take these classes and it's expensive. I just need some motivation. Basically, BSN is just for me so I can feel like people won't judge me for being only an ADN. Anyone else felt like this too? How did you get the energy and motivation to have zero free time and do BSN and full-time work?
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

  4. 3
    No offense intended but if you're doing it just because of what people think, STOP DOING IT! There are going to be those with Masters who look down on BSNs; those with PhDs who look down on MSNs; those who are MDs who look down on PhDs; millionaires who look down on MDs, billionaires who look down on millionaires, etc..... Just take your time and do it as you wish, when you wish. There are online colleges like WGU where you can give up your free time for 6 months and have a BSN in the end. I think their program is by blocks rather than by credits. So if a block of 6 months is $6000, your BSN for 6 months is $6000. But if your not dedicated to completing but one course for that block, then that one course just cost you $6000. There are programs out there that are not quite as time consuming, depending on the course....just have to research to find them. I'm working on my BSN and doing it because it is a personal goal for me as I have no plans to teach, sit behind a desk, or get a Monday thru Friday 8-5 job. I'm doing it because, for one, i had all these credits just lying around collecting dust that, after an preliminary evaluation of those credits, had me sitting with practically all of the general education requirements completed towards a BSN degree. The second reason is that 'what's trending now' grapevine shows that the BSN will be entry level for nurses in the not-too-distant future. So, I figure it will be nice to have it on the shelf should I still be amongst the working class when that day comes.

    So, I think the answer to your question would be to forget about what anyone else says or think and just do it for yourself. That way, it won't seem so grueling and before you know it, you will be back on this site seeking advice about an MSN program.
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    I am doing it because I want my BSN, so I will not be treated poorly. I could care less what people think but I do get tired of being treated like an idiot because I didn't spend 40k on a BSN right off the bat and go into tons of student loan debt. My classes are just that, classes, but it's required of me to take pointless things like statistics, which I will never use in my job.
    Last edit by JZ_RN on Mar 13, '13
  6. 0
    Quote from JZ_RN
    I am doing it because I want my BSN, so I will not be treated poorly. I could care less what people think but I do get tired of being treated like an idiot because I didn't send 40k on a BSN right off the bat and go into tons of student loan debt. My classes are just that, classes, but it's required of me to take pointless things like statistics, which I will never use in my job.
    So for the RN-BSN u just take a bunch of classes like statistics and other general electives? There's no additional clinical or hands on learning? Didn't know that. That's crazy.
  7. 0
    There are no clinicals for my BSN program, I am already a licensed and practicing RN. The BSN just seems like pointless busywork and "citing sources" which doesn't help my practice at all.
  8. 2
    Quote from JZ_RN
    There are no clinicals for my BSN program, I am already a licensed and practicing RN. The BSN just seems like pointless busywork and "citing sources" which doesn't help my practice at all.
    I will have to agree 100% with you. Ill be going tht route. Getting ASN first. RN-BSN. That's gonna be a load of fun. Not.
    SleeepyRN and sallyrnrrt like this.
  9. 1
    ok you younger nurses, just do it......i do not need it, to make more money or get a job, as a diploma prepared nurse of almost 41 yrs. i have been HN, mjr teaching hosp, director of ER etc......
    i am doing it for professional growth, even at 64 yrs. of age.

    However I truly feel in the near future the BSN will be the entry level of nursing. I feel that with three current entry levels of nursing at present, diploma, Asn, And BSN, is one of the contributing roadblocks into nursing being accepted as equal partner in health care delivery. I did not always feel this way, I was a little arrogant in that I could far out preform new BSNgraduates in a teaching hosp CCU, right out of nursing school.........that required almost 40years experience to change my mind, will i acquire new critical thinking skills etc....i doubt it, but I will end my career with the level of prepareness of the time. i can not ignore the literature and studies any longer. it is still going to take new BSN some one yr+ experience, as it always has, compared to diploma and ASN prepared nurses, but the profession will have more growth, and "worth" in the future.
    bug2621 likes this.
  10. 3
    Quote from JZ_RN
    I am doing it because I want my BSN, so I will not be treated poorly. I could care less what people think but I do get tired of being treated like an idiot because I didn't spend 40k on a BSN right off the bat and go into tons of student loan debt. My classes are just that, classes, but it's required of me to take pointless things like statistics, which I will never use in my job.
    Like you, I like the curriculum. But the infamous 'they' say it spits out well-rounded nurses. I agonized through statistics and managed a C out of it. But I can't tell you one thing about stats. I know how to relate and communicate to our diverse culture. The majority of the patients that I encounter would actually be offended if I talked to them based on what I was and am being taught in my college classes. They would feel that I'm talking down to them or over their heads. But we have to be the translators to those patients when those individuals show up who love throwing that educated lingo around. I know you know this....just trying to make you feel better by letting you know that you're not the only one who feels some of the classes are B.S. I had to take 3 progressing levels of psychology.....as if I couldn't tell with the first sentence he spoke that patient X was nutz, in layman's terms. (And I do know this knowledge is suppose to teach us how to respond to those individuals).

    I feel your pain. I've got to take a 4 month writing class to prove that I have the tools to create and produce a quality paper like the ones in the BSN nursing course that I've already received an A in, which was accepted in transfer into my BSN program. If that A showed that I am capable of writing papers through research and my English courses reflect A's on the transcript, why must I sit through a 4 month writing class? Go figure.....but there again, 'THEY' say I have to. Maybe I should continue on after the BSN to a MSN as Nurse Educator and try to make my mark by effecting change in the general education curriculum. Unfortunately, 'THEY' are not going to listen to us UNTIL we do what THEY say and get the darn degree.
    JZ_RN, SleeepyRN, and sallyrnrrt like this.
  11. 1
    I have to finish some paperwork and such but will be enrolling in another college to transfer a course I can't take through my program because of work hours and their hours for the class, but I'm going to finish it, if it takes forever haha.
    sallyrnrrt likes this.
  12. 1
    What a shame that your program does not seem to be offering you what you need or had hoped for. You don't mention your field aside from not wanting to go "back" to bedside nursing, so it is a little difficult to address your question. In general, the 'point' is to advance your education in such a way that you have new skills and expertise to offer patients (or your staff if you are in management, or your students if you teach, etc.).
    The RN - BSN programs generally do not require additional clinical time in recognition that having passed the NCLEX-RN means you have mastered basic clinical nursing skills. (Many BSN programs do have options for you to advance your clinical skills through projects, if that is your area of interest.) The 'valued added' of the BSN is in development of critical thinking skills, leadership, case management, application of research to practice, population health, health promotion, and other focus areas. Naturally this does not mean that nurses without an advanced degree can't do well in one of these areas; just that this is the goal of the added education. In addition, health care is changing so fast that much of the education of health professionals is now about setting the stage for self directed lifelong learning.

    Statistics is a great example. You are correct, most nurses will not use stats on a regular basis in clinical practice. But if you don't have a basic understanding of statistics, you cannot appropriately review or understand the literature to evaluate the benefit of new medications, practice standards, or procedures.

    Hope your program improves!
    sallyrnrrt likes this.


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