ADN's being pushed out - page 3

by pammc000

100,845 Views | 648 Comments

I work for a large Magnet hospital. As nursing becomes more popular, and nurses not in short supply, I have noticed something ominous has being going on lately. Several of our older and very seasoned ADN nurses are being fired.... Read More


  1. 4
    Quote from a016202
    I completed my BSN with a 10 year old (I was single). I finished my MSN while pregnant with my last son and working full-time. If people really want the education, they will find a way.

    Yes, all those classes DO make you a better nurse.... better communicator, a better writer, a critical thinker, etc.

    You may have the same job but BSNs/MSNs will always make a better living and have more options in their futures.
    I *have* a degree in Psychology. Think that doesn't help with communication or writing? When i go for my alternate entry MSN program, i'll be bypassing the BSN. is that going to make me less of a nurse because i didn't take nursing leadership and community nursing courses? Those are not fields i plan on working in.

    **edit**
    Last edit by 8jimi8ICURN on Aug 9, '12 : Reason: typo
    FLNurseGuy, iamshe25, gummi bear, and 1 other like this.
  2. 5
    Quote from foreverLaur

    Yes, all those history, linguistics, world music, and politics classes I took for my bachelors degree is going to make me a MUCH better nurse. Personally, I'm skipping the BSN because the MSN program in my area allows ADN + non-nursing bachelors to enter straight into the MSN just like a BSN grad would. And several ADN programs in my area have higher pass rates and more clinical hours than the BSN programs.

    A lot of the ADN grads, at least recently, are adults with families or career changers who cannot go back and do a 4 year BSN program. It is time consuming and expensive. My ADN program was dirt cheap and I'll have the same job as the BSN grads do and I got my senior preceptorship over a lot of them.
    I just finished my BSN and never took music, linguistics or history.

    I did however take classes in leadership, law and ethics, community and public health (emphasis on prevention/promotion), and above all, evidence based nursing practice.

    And yes, I am hopeful these classes have prepared me for a broader scope of practice than the excellent training my ADN brothers and sisters received in generalist, bedside nursing.
  3. 7
    Quote from Anoetos
    I just finished my BSN and never took music, linguistics or history.

    I did however take classes in leadership, law and ethics, community and public health (emphasis on prevention/promotion), and above all, evidence based nursing practice.

    And yes, I am hopeful these classes have prepared me for a broader scope of practice than the excellent training my ADN brothers and sisters received in generalist, bedside nursing.
    I'm not sure what kind of ADN program you graduated from, but we discussed ethics extensively, had an entire class on community health nursing (including a few clinicals in public health nursing), and always used evidence based practice nursing. Whoever said ADN nurses don't do a boatload of research and write a boatload of papers clearly didn't actually go to nursing school! My whole last semester is nursing leadership. Specialty electives were required and I took them in end of life nursing, trauma nursing, and critical care nursing.
    Muttlover, FLNurseGuy, SleeepyRN, and 4 others like this.
  4. 19
    Can only speak for myself: I am 52 years old. If I ever get to retire it would probably happen when I am 70 or older. I work 10 hour days 5 days per week, on call 24/7 (no pay). I do not work in a hospital, but an assisted living facility. I consider myself an RN with nearly 30 years experience. I cannot afford school and I have not the time. No one is going to hire me at my age anyways. I think BSN is great. But don't take away my experience. Don't belittle it. Don't consider me less of a nurse. My recommendation is to get your BSN first going in. Go to state schools so cost may be less. I am in management with many years experience. I see no reason for me to have to get my BSN. I should be grandfathered in. Plus, I took same test as BSN nurses.
    applewhitern, Muttlover, Jeniele, and 16 others like this.
  5. 4
    Quote from foreverLaur

    I'm not sure what kind of ADN program you graduated from, but we discussed ethics extensively, had an entire class on community health nursing (including a few clinicals in public health nursing), and always used evidence based practice nursing. Whoever said ADN nurses don't do a boatload of research and write a boatload of papers clearly didn't actually go to nursing school! My whole last semester is nursing leadership. Specialty electives were required and I took them in end of life nursing, trauma nursing, and critical care nursing.
    First of all, my program was BSN. That said, I get your point and I never meant to imply that your were inadequately prepared. I am quite certain you are a far better nurse than I will am at the moment, having just finished school.

    My point about law and ethics, community health and evidence based practice was not that the ADN doesn't get any of it, clearly you do, they form essentials of modern nursing practice. My point was that the longer BSN program permits a greater immersion in the subjects, thus, it is to be hoped a better preparation upon graduation for work in fields requiring a greater emphasis on these disciplines.

    If I was unable to make the point clearly, I am sure the fault is entirely my own.
  6. 1
    Quote from DSkelton711
    Can only speak for myself: I am 52 years old. If I ever get to retire it would probably happen when I am 70 or older. I work 10 hour days 5 days per week, on call 24/7 (no pay). I do not work in a hospital, but an assisted living facility. I consider myself an RN with nearly 30 years experience. I cannot afford school and I have not the time. No one is going to hire me at my age anyways. I think BSN is great. But don't take away my experience. Don't belittle it. Don't consider me less of a nurse. My recommendation is to get your BSN first going in. Go to state schools so cost may be less. I am in management with many years experience. I see no reason for me to have to get my BSN. I should be grandfathered in. Plus, I took same test as BSN nurses.
    I hope no one has ever belittled your experience. I know that I never would.

    But by the same token, I cannot tell you how many times, upon being asked what my degree is, I have been told by ADN prepared nurses that they are just as good as me. I cannot escape the inference that much of the animosity and division is driven by a sort of inferiority complex on their part.

    On the other hand, I can just imagine BSN prepared nurses going into the work environment and acting as though they were superior. I can imagine it, but, thankfully, I have not witnessed it.
    Technicolourhobo likes this.
  7. 1
    When I said my last semester is, I meant that I am currently in my last semester Nursing was just a second career for me - I already have a bachelors degree and I work in clinical research. I wish I could have done a 2nd degree accelerated BSN program but given the significantly higher cost (my ADN programs is $79 a credit hour) and the inability to work full-time... it simply wasn't an option.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  8. 13
    Quote from Anoetos
    I just finished my BSN and never took music, linguistics or history.

    I did however take classes in leadership, law and ethics, community and public health (emphasis on prevention/promotion), and above all, evidence based nursing practice.

    And yes, I am hopeful these classes have prepared me for a broader scope of practice than the excellent training my ADN brothers and sisters received in generalist, bedside nursing.
    I don't know of any state that has separate scopes of practice for RNs depending on their degree, despite the efforts of the pro-BSN lobbying groups.
    AJJKRN, RNKel, NurseJenny:-), and 10 others like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from nursel56

    I don't know of any state that has separate scopes of practice for RNs depending on their degree, despite the efforts of the pro-BSN lobbying groups.
    Probably an unfortunate choice of words on my part. You're quite right, scope is scope.

    Be that as it may, I hope my point wasn't lost.
    SleeepyRN likes this.
  10. 3
    All this talk of ADN vs BSN. Don't forget about us lowly diploma grads. LOL
    AJJKRN, Orange Tree, and heydelilah like this.


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