ADN 16 years experience needs education advice

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    Hey guys, I am new to this site and found this site by looking up "why get a master's in nursing if you can't be an NP?" in Google.

    I wanted to ask a question. I have worked for the last 16 years as an ADN and have worked med-surg, L&D, inpatient and out patient surgery, ER. I was trying to get back to the O.R. after making a BAD decision in taking a desk job (hated it) and found it hard to get hired!! Finally someone looked at my experience instead of the fact that all I had was an ADN and hired me due to my experience in orthopedic surgery so now I have a great part time job working with kids that have orthopedic issues.

    Ok, I found out from a nurse recruiter at a hospital that most of the hospitals in my area, (South Carolina), were trying to get magnet status and were only hiring in new hires that were BSNs. So me and my husband discussed it, found that I only needed two pre reqs to enter into an online BSN class near us (very reputable program and affordable). Ok sorry to take up so much time here, will try to shorten. Currently taking pre reqs to enter Fall 2012 online ADN-BSN program. I am 43 years old and was thinking of becoming an NP UNTIL I read about the 2015 requirement that all NPs had to have DNPs. What I was wondering was, why even get an MSN now? Would there be any thing besides teach that you could do with it? I know it is affecting all advanced practice nurses, CRNAs, FNPs, Midwives and Acute Care NPs, so is there any reason to get a Master's? And no a DNP is not in the picture. I am not going to go to three years of school while not working and one year of residency. It is hard enough to do the BSN thing!

    Why I am asking is because if there is nothing that can be done besides teach then I am going to stop after the BSN and seriously think of TOTALLY changing professions. I am not going to be able to work in an O.R. till retirement. The physical demands are just too much for me. So what is the advice? Stop after the BSN? Get an MSN in education? Or any other suggestions. Any help with this would be appreciated as a CRNA friend of mine told me to do my homework before going on with education as the landscape is changing. Thanks again!
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  3. 9 Comments so far...

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    There is no requirement for NPs to have DNP. It's been discussed for a long time, was recommended by some organizations, but no requirement is in place, nor is it likely to happen for a long, long time.
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    I'm getting my BSN on line and then MSN FNP...no DNP needed at this point. I don't think it will be a mandate any time soon. There is too much need out there.
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    It's a proposal, not a requirement, and the larger nursing community is not readily jumping on the bandwagon. The only professional group that has really embraced the idea is the CRNAs, and their target date is 2025, rather than 2015. No state has yet indicated that it is planning to require a DNP for advanced practice licensure.

    Remember the proposal that BSN be made the minimum entry point for RN licensure? Groups within nursing have been pushing that idea for >30 years now, and it's no closer to happening than it was 30 years ago. It is true, as your friend said, that the "landscape is changing" and I'm afraid that the trend is in the DNP direction over time, but I don't see a 2015 "mandate" happening. While nursing academia is v. big on this idea (for obvious, self-serving reasons ), the larger healthcare community is very familiar and comfortable with the idea of Master's-prepared advanced practice nurses, and I think it's going to be difficult to convince employers and colleagues that a doctoral degree (esp. a new one that few of them have ever heard of before) is now a necessity instead.
    Bortaz, RN likes this.
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    I agree with elkpark. However, many schools are going to DNP only for NP preparation. I'm opting for a different school than our own state university because I don't want to go the DNP route.
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    I too was an ADN grad and thought "so why do I need a BSN?" However, like you, my hospital decided to go for Magnet status and voila, I couldn't get promoted, couldn't be charge and nothing was going to change.

    So, I bit the bullet, went back (and was quite bitter and very vocal about it too) and 18 months later had my BSN.

    However, along the way, I decided that an MSN was really what I needed. However, (dumb me) what should I specialize? Then, I did an MSN (immediately after the BSN) and did the management and leadership track.

    Dumb idea (of multiple dumb ideas) I did a post-MSN CNS. So, okay, in IL a CNS is an APN. However, I couldn't' see kids, so back to school I went for a second post-MSN peds CNS.

    I did the adult CNS in 2006, the peds CNS in 2009 and then in 2011, the ANCC "retires" the adult CNS.

    Yikes!

    So, the reason I put this out there is to educate you and other posters: look ahead, look at many options, decide, or at least have a general idea of what you want BEFORE you enroll.
    Quickbeam likes this.
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    I've been an RN (BSN, second degree) for 25 years. Probably a hundred people I know went the MSN route. Most have left the profession, or teach at about half of clinical pay or just went back to the hospital.

    At my age, no way am I interested. Not enough demand in my area and very honestly, not enough cash to make it worth my while. Nursing has to be the only profession that decreases pay with increased education!

    You know who is very excited about DNP programs? Nursing schools. I was just at the Sigma Theta Tau convention and they are glowing in anticipation of revenue.
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    that is not true. How can your pay decrease with increased education?

    My local large hospital pays LPN 12.19/hour, RN 21 and NP 32.09; salaries are specifically clarified with their job description.

    Quote from Quickbeam
    I've been an RN (BSN, second degree) for 25 years. Probably a hundred people I know went the MSN route. Most have left the profession, or teach at about half of clinical pay or just went back to the hospital.

    At my age, no way am I interested. Not enough demand in my area and very honestly, not enough cash to make it worth my while. Nursing has to be the only profession that decreases pay with increased education!

    You know who is very excited about DNP programs? Nursing schools. I was just at the Sigma Theta Tau convention and they are glowing in anticipation of revenue.
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    Dear TraumaRUs,

    I agree with your post. With the impending nursing shortage, the need for registered nurses, in all different specialities, is climbing. The American Association of the Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has actually deemed that the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree be viewed as a “practice” doctorate, not a “clinical” doctorate (AACN, 2004). The AACN members voted to move the current level of educational preparation necessary for advanced nursing practice (APN) from the master’s degree to the doctorate level by the year 2015. Remember, this is suggested, not mandated (to date). The concept behind the DNP is that it brings advanced layers of education in evidence-based practice, quality improvement and systems leadership to nursing practice. As we move into 2012, I encourage those contemplating a DNP to make it a personal decision and not one of obligation. There are DNP programs, such as University of Medicine and Dentistry in New Jersey (UMDNJ), that offer executive models so that the working nurse can attend courses, work full-time and complete the DNP in only two years. With the plethora of online DNP college and universities available, I highly encourage anyone looking to return school that the nursing program's accreditation is reviewed.
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    Hello!
    I think you bring up a lot of great points. Depending on the state where you reside, there are different regulations as far as nursing practice. On the east coast, we are seeing a shift from the number of BSN to MSN/ NP programs to more BSN to DNP/NP programs. Some MSN programs are just starting to phase out and are replaced by a BSN/ DNP modality. The MSN/ NP education tracks was (is) charged with providing RNs with the core knowledge needed to practice as advanced nurse clinicians and the newer BSN-DNP will provide that same concept in addition to focusing on DNP concepts, such as evidenced based practice, quality and leadership. I think the debate between the two modalities is that some RNs only want to focus on the "meat and potato" of studies (as many MSN programs do) and other RNs want that main dish in addition to the appetizer and the dessert (as the DNP content's intention is). The DNP as a practice model will not provide NPs better assessment skills, for example, assessing murmurs, but it will help the NP to know the "why" and the "how" in finding evidenced based research supporting, broadening and advancing murmur assessments that can be applied into their practice.


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