what's the difference

  1. I am trying to get into the nursing program at one of the community colleges and theirs a long waiting list, so I hear. So I was looking at this other school and I just wanted to know what is the difference between an associate degree in nursing and a diploma in nursing?
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from finise
    I am trying to get into the nursing program at one of the community colleges and theirs a long waiting list, so I hear. So I was looking at this other school and I just wanted to know what is the difference between an associate degree in nursing and a diploma in nursing?

    An ADN is a two-year community college Associates Degree. A diploma nurse, I believe, takes classes through a hospital & earns a diploma.

    I'm sure someone else can answer this better than I can. lol

    Welcome to Allnurses.com!
  4. by   donsterRN
    I think you answered the question just fine! I'd like to add just a bit to it, if you don't mind.

    I'm currently a student in a Diploma program. Our program is for three years, and is associated with and located at a hospital-medical center. All of our non-nursing courses (English, Psychology, Sociology, A&P, Chemistry and Microbiology) are taught at the nearby college for full college credit. We also receive some transferrable credit for the nursing component of the program (including Nutrition and Pharmacology), so continuing on towards a BSN is very doable. Our program is very clinically intensive; in fact, in their last semester, the seniors take a full patient load three or four days a week. The clinical component was precisely why I chose this program, and so far, I love my school. Graduates are awarded a diploma, not a degree.

    My understanding of the ADN programs is that it takes about the same amount of time because of the pre-requisites that are required to get into the program. Once you're in, you'd have two years of study in nursing, but all of the pre-reqs would be behind you. I'm hoping that someone involved in an ADN program will explain better, because I could be all wrong about this.

    Good luck to you in whatever you decide. Ultimately, education depends a lot on what you're willing to put into it!



    Quote from Fun2Care
    An ADN is a two-year community college Associates Degree. A diploma nurse, I believe, takes classes through a hospital & earns a diploma.

    I'm sure someone else can answer this better than I can. lol

    Welcome to Allnurses.com!
  5. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Thanks, Don. lol

    I will be going into an ADN program. (HOPEFULLY IN JANUARY!!!!)

    I had to take Anatomy & Physiology 1, English Composition, College Algebra & Intro to Psychology as my pre-reqs.

    Other non-nursing classes include Anatomy & Physiology 2, Microbiology, Intro to Speech Communications, Developmental Psychology & a 3-credit hour humanities elective, in which I chose to complete before applying to the program.

    I think all together the program I applied to is a 70 credit hour program, which is 4 semesters long (5 or more semesters if you include the the pre-reqs & depends on how many classes you take at a time...lol)

    I was going to add on my first post that I thought a diploma nurse ends up having more clinical experience than ADN, and ADN has more than a BSN, but that is just what I've gathered from posts here.....and you know what comments like that can lead to! LOL!!!!!!!!

    Quote from Don3218
    I think you answered the question just fine! I'd like to add just a bit to it, if you don't mind.

    I'm currently a student in a Diploma program. Our program is for three years, and is associated with and located at a hospital-medical center. All of our non-nursing courses (English, Psychology, Sociology, A&P, Chemistry and Microbiology) are taught at the nearby college for full college credit. We also receive some transferrable credit for the nursing component of the program (including Nutrition and Pharmacology), so continuing on towards a BSN is very doable. Our program is very clinically intensive; in fact, in their last semester, the seniors take a full patient load three or four days a week. The clinical component was precisely why I chose this program, and so far, I love my school. Graduates are awarded a diploma, not a degree.

    My understanding of the ADN programs is that it takes about the same amount of time because of the pre-requisites that are required to get into the program. Once you're in, you'd have two years of study in nursing, but all of the pre-reqs would be behind you. I'm hoping that someone involved in an ADN program will explain better, because I could be all wrong about this.

    Good luck to you in whatever you decide. Ultimately, education depends a lot on what you're willing to put into it!

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