Is Nursing right for me? - page 2

by rystle

1,678 Visits | 15 Comments

I'm 24 years old with just an Associates degree in Liberal Arts. I'm single with no children at all. I would only be supporting myself. I already took all prerequisites except Anatomy and Physiology. I did take Anatomy and... Read More


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    You should shadow some different positions and find out what they do. Trust me....the money doesn't amount to the work you put in. Depending on where you live, nurses generally make $50,000 to maybe $70,000 (if you live in a state that has high living costs). It's really not that much money when you look at the responsibilites you carry. Nurses do burn out. Its a high stress job depending on where you work. Go with what you love. Nursing school can take a toll and there are lots of sacrifices that you will make.

    I see this many times in the pre-nursing section where students go into nursing because they figure its a great second option or a family member does it, so why not me. Some students have no idea what career they want, so I guess nursing should be easy enough. It's not easy! Some people spend 2-3 years just to apply, then have 2-3 years of nursing school just to have basic nursing skills. Then you get hired and have 6 months of on-the-job training which to just master your skills. It can be up to a year to even feel comfortable enough to carry out everyday nursing without feeling overwhelmed. You need to make sure you want to do it. Shadow a nurse, x-ray tech, pharmacist, dental hygenist, physical therapist in different areas and see what they do. You will know if you want it after you have witnessed the responsibilities. You can also meet with an academic adviser and let them help guide you toward a career. What's the point in making a little more money if you aren't happy?
    FormerLawyer likes this.
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    Quote from xxkmpxx
    I am SUPER shy, but have been working as a CNA for the last 3 years and now working with patients and families is like second nature to me (it WAS hard at first though).After working as a CNA, I pretty much knew that I was set on nursing. You said you love to help people so nursing could definetly be for you.Another career you may want to check out is Speech Pathology. If I wasnt in nursing school this is what I would have done. You are still helping people , but do make more money than a nurse. You would have same benefits as they are needed in hospitals, agencies, etc. You would probably have a good chance of getting a job too. School for it is not competitive either - at least here where I live. Anyone can take the classes to get your bachelors and then masters. You can also go on to get your phd.
    What exactly does a speech pathologist do? I'm slightly familiar with it, but not 100 percent sure. Where would I go to shadow all these types of jobs? I'm not sure how to go about asking. Registered Dietitian does sound like what I'm most interested in, but as you can see I'm undecided and all over the place. I worry about there not being enough jobs though for RD. There are many more nursing jobs. Thanks very much for the all the advice. It really helps getting all of your input.
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    Quote from rystle
    What exactly does a speech pathologist do? I'm slightly familiar with it, but not 100 percent sure. Where would I go to shadow all these types of jobs? I'm not sure how to go about asking. Registered Dietitian does sound like what I'm most interested in, but as you can see I'm undecided and all over the place. I worry about there not being enough jobs though for RD. There are many more nursing jobs. Thanks very much for the all the advice. It really helps getting all of your input.
    A speech and language pathologist works with people who have speech disorders and swallowing disorders. Its a really fast growing career and you can work in a school, hospital, nursing home, or in a private practice. You would need to find a university that offers a Bachelors in speech path or "communication disorders" and then go to grad school so you can become certified. Google it. I was a speech path major before I decided I wanted to pursue nursing and it really is an interesting field!
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    I think you should research registered dietician more. Look at the education requirements for schools around you for RD's, see if you can find out about job prospects for them. Who cares if they make less than RN's, and quite frankly, I am not sure if that is true, it is certainly not true for everywhere.
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    Don't get any degree if you aren't fairly sure you will like the job, because it is a ton of wasted time and money then. You sound really undecided, so I think spending some time working in a hospital would be a great thing for you. Usually the easiest job to get is a CNA type job. Depending on the state, sometimes you have to do a short couple of week course and other states, the hospital just trains you in for the job. This would give you a chance to see what RNs, RTs, RDs, PT, OT, speech, rad techs, ultrasound techs, etc. do in the hospital. There are so many different jobs that this would give you chance to talk to people, see what they do and then decide what you like. I think taking a year off school and then going back for what you want to do is much more efficient that spending a couple of years in school only to finish and find out you don't like what you are doing. And if you like kids, look into becoming a child life specialist. It's a job I didn't know existed until I started working at a children's hospital. Good luck figuring out your path
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    Quote from Annaiya
    Don't get any degree if you aren't fairly sure you will like the job, because it is a ton of wasted time and money then. You sound really undecided, so I think spending some time working in a hospital would be a great thing for you. Usually the easiest job to get is a CNA type job. Depending on the state, sometimes you have to do a short couple of week course and other states, the hospital just trains you in for the job. This would give you a chance to see what RNs, RTs, RDs, PT, OT, speech, rad techs, ultrasound techs, etc. do in the hospital. There are so many different jobs that this would give you chance to talk to people, see what they do and then decide what you like. I think taking a year off school and then going back for what you want to do is much more efficient that spending a couple of years in school only to finish and find out you don't like what you are doing. And if you like kids, look into becoming a child life specialist. It's a job I didn't know existed until I started working at a children's hospital. Good luck figuring out your path
    I second this. I became a cna for this very reason because I thought I wanted to be a nurse but didn't want to go through all that if I didn't like it. Plus I had other healthcare careers in mind and being a cna I often come across people of many different fields. I decided against nursing but I still admire what they do because now I really see everything they go through.


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