LPN or ADN? LPN or ADN? | allnurses

LPN or ADN?

  1. 0 The local community college offers a LPN program.

    I'm thinking LPN equals getting your foot in the door. Faster schooling. Faster to a paycheck.

    My husband tells me he has heard LPN is Low Pay Nurse.

    All of the same hassle with a lot less pay.

    Can you get hired as a LPN?

    Thoughts?
  2. 20 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  zoe92 profile page
    1
    This gets asked a lot and really it depends on your situation & those factors (like where you live). I would search LPN or ADN in the search bar at the top of the page because you will get a lot of answers.
    VanessaBlueEyes likes this.
  4. Visit  VanessaBlueEyes profile page
    0
    Thank you.
    I'm in Michigan.
  5. Visit  zoe92 profile page
    1
    I found this which may help: LPN versus RN school
    SquishyRN likes this.
  6. Visit  maddiem profile page
    0
    I would just go for your ADN. Doing the LPN can get complicated because a lot of schools don't have an easy way to bridge the LPN students into the RN program. It happened at my school and they are now phasing out the LPN program. Plus, LPN's are limited when it comes to where they work. I know a few people who are LPN's and they all have jobs at nursing homes passing meds basically. You make around $17 an hour as a new LPN. I wouldn't wast your time, just get your RN!
  7. Visit  VanessaBlueEyes profile page
    0
    Thank you!
  8. Visit  SquishyRN profile page
    2
    I agree with your husband in that it's "All of the same hassle with a lot less pay," but it's not like you intend on staying an LPN. I went the LVN route for the very reasons you stated -- "LPN equals getting your foot in the door. Faster schooling. Faster to a paycheck" -- and it has been working out pretty well for me so far. I didn't have any pre-requisites completed, so it made sense to enter an LVN program first and work as an LVN while I completed my pre-reqs. If I went straight for my RN, it meant staying unemployed longer while doing both pre-reqs AND the RN program, or at least not employed in healthcare.

    I worked as an LVN for two years while doing my pre-reqs and started an LVN-ADN program last June. In 8 more weeks I'll be done with the program . Being an LVN and working before and throughout the program definitely gave me an advantage in school and gives me an advantage over other new grads after graduation. Although I have not had as much time to study as my other classmates because of work, I know I will have a job after graduation.
    HeatherMax and VanessaBlueEyes like this.
  9. Visit  Tim92 profile page
    0
    I agree with what a lot of the poster are saying. However, I am leaning on doing what you thought - going to get my LPN first then get my RN later when I have a few years of experence as an LPN.
  10. Visit  Kimynurse profile page
    1
    It's very personal
    I am happy I become a LPN first, I graduated in 2009, I started my pre-recs as soon as I graduated and started working. I am now in a RN program. I am so happy I am doing it this way.
    Yes I work hard, but I'm gaining amazing knowledge.
    VanessaBlueEyes likes this.
  11. Visit  Ella26 profile page
    0
    Quote from VanessaBlueEyes
    The local community college offers a LPN program.

    I'm thinking LPN equals getting your foot in the door. Faster schooling. Faster to a paycheck.

    My husband tells me he has heard LPN is Low Pay Nurse.

    All of the same hassle with a lot less pay.

    Can you get hired as a LPN?

    Thoughts?

    I was an LPN first and while it took alot longer to get to the ADN, I still think it was a great option for me (time and money played important factors). I applied to ADN so many times, and did not get in (too many waiting lists). So I thought well if I can just get in LPN right away and bridge over that would be great. So thats what I did. I am in MN and I too had heard about the "Low paid nurse" and all the other hurtful names for LPNs. But I am very greatful of my choice and it was a great stepping stone into the world of nursing. Also I didnt want to spend all this time and money and find out I did not like nursing. So as soon as I graduated in 2009, I got my first job in a at Detox/Chemical Health facility and then a second job at a Clinic. I didnt even apply to LTC-its not my niche and I was determined to get an LPN job outside of LTC.
    After graduation, I immediately started pre-reqs and started LPN-ADN program Fall 2011 and just graduated Fall 2012. Passed NCLEX-RN in Feb. 2013. I am still at the clinic-So I do have a job. I no longer work at the Detox (ironically they let all their LPNs go to hire all RNs).

    So my answer to your question. If you can get directly into ADN then go for it. But if you find that they have long wait lists, then try LPN to get your foot in the door. I feel that by the time I graduated LPN school I would just be starting ADN because of their long wait list.

    And depending on your area LTC is not your only option for LPN. Good luck in whatever you decide.
    I may go back for BSN but not in the next year I am so sick of school now, Im ready to live my life.
    Nursing school is so time consuming so be ready to be on a long arduos journey if you go either route.
    Last edit by Ella26 on Apr 2, '13 : Reason: punctuation
  12. Visit  CT Pixie profile page
    1
    I became an LPN in July 2008. I always knew RN is my goal. Around here, getting into the nursing programs is very difficult and very competitive. The LPN to RN bridge programs are much easier to get into b/c by the 2nd year, there are a lot of open seats available due to people dropping out in the first 2 semesters or failing out. So I wasn't competing for 1 of 100 seats with 300 other people. I was only competing with a handful of people. I am set to graduate the 2nd wk of May.

    Doing the LPN to RN route worked for me. It was much more costly in the end, but it was what was best for me and my family at the time. I still had to do all of the pre-reqs that any other student would have to do in order to get into the program, but I was allowed to skip the first year of the nursing classes and begin in the 2nd year of the classes.

    Not all States have the bridge option so it might not be something you can do.
    VanessaBlueEyes likes this.
  13. Visit  Shorty11 profile page
    2
    I really think it depends on your individual situation and where you live. Also, do you want to go on to get an ADN, BSN, MSN, PhD? This topic comes up a lot on allnurses. I would search past related posts for more opinions. I am working on my BSN. I would like to go on to get my MSN, so this was the best option for me.
  14. Visit  VanessaBlueEyes profile page
    0
    Great info and advice. Thanks so much!

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