How do you get to be a RN?

  1. I'm a pre-nursing student right now, currently a freshmen. I plan to be a RN, but how do i get there? I'm lost, and I don't know how to start. and what are the differences with RN and BSN, and LPN, and MSN?? I'm lost as to how this nursing thing works!
    •  
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   RNDreamer
    I would suggest speaking with a school advisor about your plans and options. In addition, here is a site that I used to visit when I decided to finally pursue nursing:

    http://www.discovernursing.com/nursing-the-basics2

    Quote from aleong
    I'm a pre-nursing student right now, currently a freshmen. I plan to be a RN, but how do i get there? I'm lost, and I don't know how to start. and what are the differences with RN and BSN, and LPN, and MSN?? I'm lost as to how this nursing thing works!
  4. by   LovePeas
    I'm also pre-nursing but from what I've learned so far is that some states(not sure about NY) will RN(registered nurse) at a 2 year program. LPN stands for Licensed Pratical Nurse which you can become at a vocational school in usually a year. BSN means that you have a Bachelors Degree in Nursing. And MSN is a Masters in Nursing. Hope that was helpful!!:spin: You say that you're pre-nursing? Are you at a school that offers a RN program?.......I do know that each state has it's own requirements. Good Luck!!
  5. by   LMRN10
    Definitely talk to an advisor at your school!!! All schools are different, so this is the best way to get the correct information for your situation!!! Also, have you looked at the school's website for any information? You might be able to find some stuff there. Any lingo you may not know right now, you will be a pro in down the road!!! Your best bet is to speak with someone at the school though. Best of luck!
  6. by   jackson145
    Sounds about right. LPN/LVN is a technical certificate instead of diploma-2 semesters at my school. AASN, ASN, ADN are all about the same-usually 2 years. BSN-usually 4 years. ASN take same NCLEX (state licensing exam) as BSN, but usually need to be BSN to be area manager (at least where I work). MSN is the masters degree and you can be many different things with that. We have department heads that are MSN and some nurses get MSN to be nurse practitioner or nursing school instructer.

    Talk to a counselor to make sure you are taking the pre-reqs you really need and to see if there is an entrance exam that you could begin preparing for.
    You might also look into voluntering at a hospital/nursing home or taking a tech job or even secreterial so you'll have some idea of what a nurse sees/hears/smells and deals with in general. You'll never see it all, but it can definetely tell you if it's not for you!

close