Chemistry not required for nursing program? - page 5

by RN2BE93 | 8,403 Views | 56 Comments

Hi guys! I applied to a school and found out that chemistry is not a pre req for their nursing program and you don't have to take it at all. Is that normal?... Read More


  1. 0
    My school doesn't require Chemistry, either. Even I wondered what was up with that... Not like I'm complaining, though... I took Chemistry before. I just see that alot of schools in my area do and mine is one of the few that doesn't.
  2. 1
    Quote from Keeka_Prenurse13
    My school doesn't require Chemistry, either. Even I wondered what was up with that... Not like I'm complaining, though... I took Chemistry before. I just see that alot of schools in my area do and mine is one of the few that doesn't.
    Yeah that's the main reason I posted this thread because I was curious. I mean it's a legit BSN program, they teach clinicals inside of a hospital and the hospital is one of Midwest's finest facility. So for people to sit here and bash programs because they don't require chemistry are full of it! I took chemistry in high school and it wasn't my strongest subject like most people say. I'm a strong student, have a great GPA and dedicated to to learning as much as i can. So even if chemistry isn't part of a nursing program doesn't mean u cant learn it; have someone teach u even if u don't take the class, like your professor not just some random joe that doesn't know anything about the field. I don't believe that one class is gonna make or break your nursing career. It's just like if you get a job in labor and delivery fresh out of nursing school but people say oh you're supposed to go to med/surg because of the experience you get. So does that make u less of a nurse? You're continuously learning in the nursing field, so if you might be lacking in one area you can learn how to better yourself and knowledge. It's not like nursing is a career where you stop learning after you graduate.
    brenay likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from GrnTea

    Seriously?

    Knowing that a protein molecule, for example, has parts that interact with parts of drug molecules and that's why the drug is structured to work to block the protein, thus treating the disease state. Knowing that positive and negative charges are why and how fluids and electrolytes travel across cell membranes. Knowing what osmolarity is and why there are may causes of edema. Knowing that the way sodium channels work is how a nerve impuse travels along an axon and the membrane repolarizes (and hey, what's "repolarizes"?), so when serum sodium is deranged, you get neuro effects. Knowing how calcium ion charges affect neuromuscular communication. When somebody says a drug is a MAO inhibitor, what's that mean? I could go on and on.

    "I don't need to know that to take care of patients." Oh, probably not, if you are satisfied with what's apparently turning into drone/superCNA/task-oriented training. IMHO, though, loss of that sort of bigger picture makes for a limited practice. More education makes you more able to understand what you're seeing and what should be happening. That's the nurse I want.
    I learned absolutely NONE of that in chemistry. The vast majority of Chem requiring programs require inorganic chemistry, which is presented in relation to the body at a rate of pretty much... zero. But if you need me for some qualitative analysis or you'd like me to identify some sort of unknown element, I'm your gal.

    All of that was learned in anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, and med-surg, in my case.
    gummi bear likes this.
  4. 0
    That would be so NICE not to have Chem. However, I am taking it as a pre-req for our RN porgram during the coming Spring semester. I attempted it once during the summer, and have to say that was a BAD move. It is a hard class, and for me-I need more time to grasp it all. Hope this Chem semester goes well for me! I need to pass it to take my TEAS August 1st. 2013 at JJC.
  5. 1
    Quote from student4u2
    That would be so NICE not to have Chem. However, I am taking it as a pre-req for our RN porgram during the coming Spring semester. I attempted it once during the summer, and have to say that was a BAD move. It is a hard class, and for me-I need more time to grasp it all. Hope this Chem semester goes well for me! I need to pass it to take my TEAS August 1st. 2013 at JJC.
    I was debating if I should take Chem over the summer because its a requirement for another school I applied too. But u go to JJC? I go to COD lol..but good luck on the TEAS. I have to take the HESI
    student4u2 likes this.
  6. 0
    I sent you a friend request on here. Considering we are both in the same boat & almost neighbors (JJC & COD). I have had a few friend's who went to the RN program at COD, and I work with them on the MED/SURG unit at Good Samaritan hospital. COD it appears is a GREAT nursing school. Good luck on the HESI, and from what I hear it is not that bad.
  7. 0
    Quote from student4u2
    I sent you a friend request on here. Considering we are both in the same boat & almost neighbors (JJC & COD). I have had a few friend's who went to the RN program at COD, and I work with them on the MED/SURG unit at Good Samaritan hospital. COD it appears is a GREAT nursing school. Good luck on the HESI, and from what I hear it is not that bad.
    How do you accept the request? Lol I'm still new on here. Idk if I see it. I have heard its good too, I wish COD was a 4 year school because I would definitely love to stay going to school there! I'm planning on trying to look around for some hospital/assisted living jobs or something as a CNA when my knee heels. Thanks for the luck! I bought the book to study from, not that bad. The math section is my only problem lol
  8. 0
    Quote from SUNFL0WER
    Yea-huh! My patient needs to know that he's on a diuretic, and I'm gonna be all like, "So you don't absorb the ions which include electrons and protons and it's chemically impossible to have electrons with identical quantum numbers, so therefore you either have a negative or positive charges, in which your case you have a decreased positive charge, a cation, because er.... You're peeing more because you have too much fluid.

    Sorry...
    No, but you need to know that the drug the doctor ordered will do the right thing for your patient. It's important. Doctors make mistakes all the time that can be incredibly bad for a patient. It's a heads up nurse that can save a life.

    And, if I hadn't had chemistry, I would have had a tougher time with drug calc for sure.
  9. 0
    Quote from rubato
    No, but you need to know that the drug the doctor ordered will do the right thing for your patient. It's important. Doctors make mistakes all the time that can be incredibly bad for a patient. It's a heads up nurse that can save a life.

    And, if I hadn't had chemistry, I would have had a tougher time with drug calc for sure.
    *Fair warning!* I'm not trying to be a jerk, even if I come off like it. I say things as I'm writing it with my own voice, with added emphasis, but the interweb hasn't developed enough for me to show it here.

    Example: I type Nu-uh. But what I am doing in real life is weaving my head side to side as I snap my fingers.

    Way off topic.

    Back on topic.

    I understand the nurse needs to know what each drug is and why you are giving it. You need to know what to look for and when not to give it and call the doctor. I know this. However, any pharmacology class is going to teach you these things, along with all of your nursing integrating related medications into the information.

    When you say drug calc are you talking about calculations?

    Chemistry is a great class, but far more in depth, at least at my school, than/then (tense?) need be. I understand the frustration from both sides.

    On one side, you have happy-go-lucky students that don't need to take it, that may be fine without it. I only say this because I go to a 4-year BSN program where every class and pre-requisite you take all have nursing integrated into them. All of the faculty know each other and most of them are nurses themselves, or doctor's. If you want to know about isotonic fluids or positive contentrations, but the Chemistry class you took 2 years ago just isn't filling in the blank, my nursing class will fill that in with no problem and you reinforced your learning or learned something new.

    On the other side, Chemistry greatly helps people with various things, such as yourself. Perhaps you are dumbfounded that such a scientific art can be depleted from programs that greatly need Chemistry in order to be successful. Perhaps you are a working nurse who is weary of the wave of new nurses that don't know what a covalent bond is and that you'll probably have to teach them yourselves. Whatever the case, there are always differences in cases.

    My program could have probably gotten by without Chemistry just because of the small size and closeness of all of the classes relating to nursing. Although, I think I would have still wanted to do Chemistry just so I didn't miss anything.

    Chemistry is hard. So I do see why people would be happy to not take it. But sometimes it may not be needed in certain situations and places.
  10. 0
    Quote from ImDaMan11
    oh wow well then I stand corrected! you should at least take an intro Chem class though in my opinion
    I don't think chemistry will necessarily make you a better nurse. Just chck if you need it for grad school if you plan on going. If you have financial aid now, it might be worth it to take it as an undergrad


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top