Certification (EMT or phlebotomy) before applying to ABSN programs

  1. 0
    In Fall 2014 I will be applying to several ABSN programs, one of which is CSUN's ABSN program. I'm currently a student at CSUN finishing my BA in Psychology. I found some information on CSUN's ABSN program website which states that competitive applicants are those who have either an EMT or phlebotomy certification. Any advice on which certification would be best and most useful? I found a pretty good EMT certification program at College of the Canyons. However, I'm having difficulty finding a good, reputable phlebotomy certification program. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

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  2. 12 Comments...

  3. 0
    EMT would be the best certification you can have. We have 3 or so EMTs in our class and they have an edge.
  4. 0
    I'm a phlebotomy tech and I say go for EMT. You'll get more hands on patient care experience.

    While phlebotomy helped me feel comfortable talking to patients while performing an unpleasant procedure, it can tend to be a monotonous task day in & out. I did learn a lot of helpful info about lab values that I'm using in my 1st semester of nursing school. I feel confident I'll be able to find a good vein when we're ready to insert IVs.

    There are pros & cons to each. I got my certification through a community college. Still can't find a job as a PBT in a hospital. I don't think they want to spend the time training me just to have me transfer into an RN position later.
  5. 0
    Of those two certifications, EMT will serve you better because you'll at least have some idea about how to do a physical exam and take vital signs. Neither will, in and of themselves, help you get a job after RN school is done.
  6. 0
    This is interesting to me... I am in an EMT-B class right now and more than one nurse at my job (I also work as a CNA) has asked me "Why bother?" (they know I am doing the pre-reqs for nursing). They seem to think it is a big waste of time. It's something I've wanted to do for a long time, though, so when an opportunity came up, I took it.

    I am doing mine for free because I volunteer at fire dept. If you have the time to do it, you might look into something like that so you don't have to pay for it (plus you'll get the experience).
  7. 0
    As a CNA, your training and experience will have a bigger impact upon your practice as a nurse than EMT training actually will. That being said, you'll probably get more experience actually assessing patients as an EMT than you will as a CNA. I'm sure you're also finding out that EMT and CNA (and nursing in general) are different animals.

    Once you go nursing, put EMT on the back burner until you're done.
  8. 0
    Thank you everyone for the advice, it's very helpful! I'm looking to do the EMT-B program during the winter at College of the Canyons. Trying to be as competitive of a nursing applicant as possible!
  9. 0
    Quote from ElizabethH736
    Thank you everyone for the advice, it's very helpful! I'm looking to do the EMT-B program during the winter at College of the Canyons. Trying to be as competitive of a nursing applicant as possible!
    I think something that I forgot to mention is that when it comes to having additional licenses/certifications, they seem to typically give weight to only one that you would have. So if you have phlebotomy and EMT certificate, they would only assigned to one of those. So if having some kind of healthcare certificate is worth an additional 3 points and you have 2 healthcare certificates, you get only 3 points, not 6. Make sense?
  10. 0
    Quote from akulahawk
    As a CNA, your training and experience will have a bigger impact upon your practice as a nurse than EMT training actually will. That being said, you'll probably get more experience actually assessing patients as an EMT than you will as a CNA. I'm sure you're also finding out that EMT and CNA (and nursing in general) are different animals.

    Once you go nursing, put EMT on the back burner until you're done.
    Yes, actually, I'm finding out pretty quickly too that the one I thought I would really like (EMT) is less interesting/fulfilling/"fun" than the one I thought I would hate (CNA). I only did the CNA class because one of the nursing programs I want to apply to requires it, but so far, I enjoy the job much more than going on calls.

    Good luck, ElizabethH! The class IS valuable, and at the very least, I feel like a better-prepared mom to my son ;-) (Though truly, EMT work is fun too.)
  11. 0
    Theres a big difference in doing a EMT-B program and actually working as an EMT. If you can actually get some work experience as an EMT I think that will help, just get the certification won't do much. The training isn't all that helpful in my opinion.


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