Why you shouldn't become a nurse practitioner - page 3

by chillnurse 14,020 Views | 43 Comments

Why you shouldn’t become a nurse practitioner. There are many reasons why people should not become nurse practitioners. I will outline a short article stating why YOU should NOT pursue a nurse practitioner degree, EVEN if... Read More


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    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    DNP,I cannot imagine making 65 bucks an hour as an NP. You are making more than some of the CRNAs at the hospital I work. However, didn't you say in a previous thread that your facility is unusual in that it pays NPs and MDs with similar experience the same pay rate?As for this thread, OP makes a good point in that becoming an NP has its draw backs.
    With productivity, I am over $65/hr average as well.
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    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    DNP,I cannot imagine making 65 bucks an hour as an NP. You are making more than some of the CRNAs at the hospital I work. However, didn't you say in a previous thread that your facility is unusual in that it pays NPs and MDs with similar experience the same pay rate?As for this thread, OP makes a good point in that becoming an NP has its draw backs.
    In some job markets...of course the cost of living compares...bedside nurses with experience make $60.00 plus, plus in the Boston area. I know that is a fact personally.

    So yes it is possible for a FNP to make that.
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    Quote from chillnurse
    I know I apologize. I'll edit my future posts. I'm always in too much a hurry to edit but I'll do it from now on to make it an easier read.

    I also don't think my word processor agrees with copy pasting to the forum lol.
    No it doesn't...sorry. Firefox works best for me. If you can't edit...report it we can do that for you.
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    Thanks, I shall fix it as soon as I get home on an actual computer. The pa and nP in the ER group where i am make about 65 an hour. Ones in pain clinic make 60-80 + an hour, but that does not really county in regards to what most of us are interested in. The dr i work for basically told me I have the ability to pull a pretty high salary if i see a good amount of patients. That and he doesn't want to hire any other nps at the moment since he has had some bad experiences with new graduates and it will cost him 22000 to add another license to his ERH system. And the cost of living is pretty low where I am at in KY.

    My area is pretty good for NP. rns where i live start off at 19 an hour. pretty terrible. But it is because there is a flood of RNs since its like the only major the local comm college has that is worth a hoot.
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    If you work in a pain clinic you earn every bit of that money. Tough job.
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    This reminds me of another post/blog I saw somewhere else except it was, "Why you don't want to become a PA". This post, just like that one gets its point across to the intended audience who are people like me currently researching career paths.

    To people who are already in the field of nursing it may seem offensive in some way but understand it is meant to be an eye opener for me and my peers who have BIG dreams and lots of assumptions regarding what majors to pursue and why, then educating ourselves on such things.

    I am not a traditional student, I'm in my early thirties and some of the things that my fellow students who are more than decade younger than me seem to think about building and growing a career are just not realistic. They think that they can go from point A to C and find ways to bypass B all while making boat loads of money and OPENLY sharing stories of their Xanax and Adderall popping along the way (with no rx mind you) and doing little research into the career choices they make and ultimately end up disappointed.

    By the way some of these people think the NP job is some what similar to an RN with more money, a rx pad and a title change, so I'm not surprised the OP made reference to that.

    So thank you for providing some insight to a potential nursing student. I will pay more attention to school accreditation standards and stay open minded about salary expectations for my particular market here in Philly.
    Last edit by Ally082 on Mar 16
    Dazglue, ToFNPandBeyond, myelin, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from Esme12
    In some job markets...of course the cost of living compares...bedside nurses with experience make $60.00 plus, plus in the Boston area. I know that is a fact personally. So yes it is possible for a FNP to make that.
    Good point!Cost of living definitely needs to be taken into account when talking about salary. Sixty bucks per hour in California or NYC is nowhere near as impressive as making sixty bucks per hour in the midwest.Still, as a nursing assistant, I can't imagine that kind of money. To OP, I forgot to ask but what do you think about nurses extending in their own specialties as NPs? For example, my short term goal is to work as a NICU nurse. Long term? Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Or how about the psychiatric nurse with ten years of experience wanting to advance as a psychiatric NP? I don't think you can clump those examples with pre-pre nursing students looking to become an NP for "quick big money" and not a modicum of healthcare experience or a clue as to what it means to be an NP.
    vumblevee likes this.
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    I would totally base my decision on more of if you like the current setting you are in than relating the decision to how long you have practiced in that setting. Previous experience in one area will help some, but not as much as many portray. I would do what you like, not what you are experienced in. The role of an NP is very very very different than that of an RN. somebody who has done what you have stated may be able to answer this question better than I.
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    Quote from chillnurse
    I would totally base my decision on more of if you like the current setting you are in than relating the decision to how long you have practiced in that setting. Previous experience in one area will help some, but not as much as many portray. I would do what you like, not what you are experienced in. The role of an NP is very very very different than that of an RN. somebody who has done what you have stated may be able to answer this question better than I.
    Very true. When you become an NP you are another provider with a scope of practice that differs greatly from a regular RN. The big difference is the approach to a situation and the type of thinking comes from a nursing perspective. I find myself to be a much better teacher than many physicians I've worked with during my clinicals simply because I've spent so much time teaching patients as an RN.

    Similarly, previous experience helps, but the quality of that experience is important. I've worked 7 years in critical care, most of it as a charge nurse. The type of nursing I do is very independent and full of critical thought, which has been a tremendous help in my NP program. If I were a cath lab nurse handing over supplies, I probably wouldn't value my experience as much in NP school. Additionally, having experience was a huge asset when it came time to having to find my own preceptors. I can't imagine being less than a year out of school and having to find people.
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    Quote from Riburn3
    Very true. When you become an NP you are another provider with a scope of practice that differs greatly from a regular RN. The big difference is the approach to a situation and the type of thinking comes from a nursing perspective. I find myself to be a much better teacher than many physicians I've worked with during my clinicals simply because I've spent so much time teaching patients as an RN.

    Similarly, previous experience helps, but the quality of that experience is important. I've worked 7 years in critical care, most of it as a charge nurse. The type of nursing I do is very independent and full of critical thought, which has been a tremendous help in my NP program. If I were a cath lab nurse handing over supplies, I probably wouldn't value my experience as much in NP school. Additionally, having experience was a huge asset when it came time to having to find my own preceptors. I can't imagine being less than a year out of school and having to find people.
    Ohh, I see. I was wondering why many NP programs require at least 1-2 years experience as an RN before applying even though the OP says it's a very different role and RN experience won't help very much.

    This thread was useful. I always felt kind of weird when I was in my undergrad RN program because I got a sense there was a lot of pushing for advanced degrees and becoming an NP. Professors with so many titles in front of their names. Classmates who already decided from the beginning they want to be an NP. I understand knowing what options are available for the future and thinking about where you want to be, but right now I'm trying to focus on how to be a better nurse, and figure out what my niche in nursing is, never mind what I want to go to grad school for.


    I think this is common for colleges in general though, since a lot of undergrads get sucked into the allure of getting a PhD/masters right after getting their Bachelor's without getting any job experience first. Colleges these days just want to make money. Of course it's a personal decision at the end of the day, so what can I say.


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