doctoral degree when not a nurse practitioner

  1. So long and short is I'll finish my MSN in education in feb. Started looking into DNP/PHD programs but all are geared to APRN which I'm not considered.

    My options are an Ed. D but I'm worried that won't work in other roles in the future. Anyone know any DNP/ PHD programs online for non Aprns
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   llg
    PhD programs are not geared for APRNs.
  4. by   msufan3710
    Second that- EdD and PhD programs are typically geared towards the non-APRN crowd.
  5. by   shibaowner
    An NP can certainly earn a PhD. This is a good option for an NP that wants to focus on teaching and/or research.
  6. by   DizzyJon
    What other roles do you think you may consider down the road? You can get a DNP without being an NP. There are DNPs with nursing education focus. Another degree to consider is DHSc (doctorate in health science). It is the degree I did and is open to any health care profession with masters degree. Check out AT Still or Nova. It is a good degree for academics or administration goals.
  7. by   Caprica6
    I think that you have to ask yourself what you want to do with your doctoral degree. Do you want to generate new knowledge to advance the nursing profession and healthcare delivery? Or are you more interested in translating research into practice and improving patient outcomes? If it's the former that you like, then go for a PhD; the latter...a DNP. You don't need to be a APRN for either degree. Keep in mind that the PhD is more desirable for academia if that's the direction you're headed in (you mentioned a EdD).

    Here's a link you might find helpful:
    Do your research
  8. by   meanmaryjean
    I did the one-year accelerated (aka BRUTAL) DNP in Ed. Leadership at Touro University Nevada. 100% online and the tuition was reasonable. I am a pre-licensure program director now. The dean of one of Indiana's largest programs is also a grad of this program.
  9. by   DizzyJon
    Wanted to add...also check on a couple of the DrPH (public health) program like USF (U of South Florida) offers a DrPH program with a concentration in advanced practice leadership in public health. Boston U and Harvard also have DrPH programs.
  10. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    I did the one-year accelerated (aka BRUTAL) DNP in Ed. Leadership at Touro University Nevada. 100% online and the tuition was reasonable. I am a pre-licensure program director now. The dean of one of Indiana's largest programs is also a grad of this program.
    I am really interested in that program, but unfortunately they are not accepting applicants from my current state of residence. Bummer!
  11. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from Pixie.RN
    I am really interested in that program, but unfortunately they are not accepting applicants from my current state of residence. Bummer!
    Yeah- I don't really know why that happened. Which sucks. You might look at Chatham in Puttsburgh- it was my second choice,
  12. by   meanmaryjean
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    Yeah- I don't really know why that happened. Which sucks. You might look at Chatham in Puttsburgh- it was my second choice,
    Lord have mercy- I meant Pittsburgh.....
  13. by   TiffyRN
    I'm not totally clear. . . So you want either a DNP or a PhD? You are right that DNP is mostly (though not exclusively) geared for APRNs though I don't know much about those. I have heard one can get a DNP in leadership without the APRN which I don't understand but you know nursing, we specialize in complicating educational paths.

    The PhD is certainly available to non-APRNs because I'm such such a program. In fact, in our entire cohort only 2 of the 8 were NPs and only one survived the program long enough to take comps. PhD is going to be more academically focused and does not require the advanced clinical knowledge. The emphasis is on strong scholastic ability. For example, we had a recent graduate who was a psych nurse (not NP) who did her study on school nursing. Yes, it did have a psych flavor to it but the skills you need are more about finding a good research question, exploring the literature, designing a study, conducting a rigorous study and writing it up.

    My program is out of UTMB-Galveston and is available to out-of-State students but they are certainly not the only program out there. I didn't expend a lot of energy looking because I was hoping to get into a State university to hopefully control costs as I am a Texas resident. I found that there were 4 programs in my State, one was campus-based only, and I had missed that year's application deadlines for 2 of them. So thankfully I got into the remaining program and it has worked out so far. Hoping to have my proposal defended by the end of the year and (maybe) defend my dissertation by the end of next year. That would put me at about 4.5 years to completion and that is about average even if you come from a BSN like I did. Probably the fastest it can be done coming from an MSN is 2.5-3 years.

    My program required one yearly visit the first 3 years then I don't absolutely have to go back to campus unless I want to defend my dissertation in person (can be done by Skype) or if I want to walk in the graduation ceremonies. Most assignments are papers or powerpoint type presentations with voiceover. There are a few required monitored tests and they can be arranged to be done local to you.
  14. by   mmc51264
    Duke and UNC-Greensboro both have DNP programs for non APP MSN students. I am finishing my MSN in Informatics. My preceptor just completed her DNP @ UNCG. I have applied to Duke, but am a little burned out of school so I am going to take a break until fall 2018 at least. Had a friend finish her DNP and her MSN was finance and admin. '
    Not sure why si many DNP programs are geared toward the APPs

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