which is the best one?

  1. Dear Nurses:

    I work as a nurse and observed many different communication from different nurses for a patient:

    1. Prompt patient to use the trazepe bar.

    (a) hands hold on overhead bar.
    (b) hands grab overhead bar.
    (c) hands grasp overhead bar.

    2. Bring patient's feet down from bed to the ground and sit up on the bedside, prompt patient:

    (a) put down your feet.
    (b) swing down your feet.
    (c) turn down your feet.

    3. Patient uses four wheel walker back close to bed, brakes on, and has to release hands from the handle of wheel walker. Regarding releasing hands, prompt patient:

    (a) put hands down.
    (b) hands off.
    (c) hands off the wheel walker.

    As to above three questions, please advise which one is the best.


    Thanks.
    •  
  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   K+MgSO4
    There is nothing incorrect with anything. What are you asking?
  4. by   Anonymous865
    It's not clear what your goal is here. If you are asking for what is the clearest way to communicate what you want the patient to do, then I would say

    1. Using both hands, firmly grasp the trapeze bar

    (grab means grasp or seize somethig suddenly and roughly, so I wouldn't use grab)

    ("hands hold overhead bar" is a description not a direction for the patient to follow and also just awkward)

    2. Sit on the edge of the bed. Allow your feet to dangle. Once you have your balance, firmly plant your feet on the floor.

    "swing down your feet" makes me want to sit on the edge of the bed swinging my feet back and forth. You aren't telling them what position you want them in when they have completed your orders.

    If you said put down your feet to me, I would laugh and say, I'm not holding my feet.

    Turn down your feet makes me think of a knob that I need to turn down like turning down the volume on the radio

    3. It sounds like here you do not want your patient to be touching the walker. Do you want them to just stand there without touching anything? Do you want them to transfer their hands one at a time to the arms of the chair, so they can lower themselves into the chair.

    Tell them what position you want them in after they release the walker. Something like "using the right had, release the walker and grasp the right arm of the chair. Next using the left hand release the walker and grasp the left arm of the chair. Back up toward the chair until you legs can feel the seat of the chair. Now slowly lower yourself into the chair."
  5. by   BuckyBadgerRN
    I think forget the script and say whatever the patient understands. Geesh, way to overthink!!
  6. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from John 2000
    Dear Nurses:

    I work as a nurse and observed many different communication from different nurses for a patient:

    1. Prompt patient to use the trazepe bar.

    (a) hands hold on overhead bar.
    (b) hands grab overhead bar.
    (c) hands grasp overhead bar.

    2. Bring patient's feet down from bed to the ground and sit up on the bedside, prompt patient:

    (a) put down your feet.
    (b) swing down your feet.
    (c) turn down your feet.

    3. Patient uses four wheel walker back close to bed, brakes on, and has to release hands from the handle of wheel walker. Regarding releasing hands, prompt patient:

    (a) put hands down.
    (b) hands off.
    (c) hands off the wheel walker.

    As to above three questions, please advise which one is the best.


    Thanks.
    Are you asking these questions because English is not your first language? " Please reach up and grasp the trapeze bar"
    "I am going to help you sit up in the bedside with your feet on the floor"
    Patient should step back against the bed,reach around to the mistress to sit ."Back up until you feel the bed against your legs,now reach behind you,grasp that railing,let go of the walker and lower yourself down on the bed"
  7. by   JannyWilson
    Use your experience and do not stick to any rules. Everything is really individual what side to step left or right. I liked the previous answer much. Wish you much luck with it!

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