ITT Tech's New Program??? - page 5

I was on the Oregon Board of Nursing page today and I saw that ITT Tech in Portland has been granted "initial approval" for an Associates in Nursing program!!! I called ITT to get more information, because it is not listed on... Read More

  1. 0
    Quote from hannahbear
    Hi guys..I'm new to these threads. I just went to an information session for the ITT Tech in Indy yesterday! I am very interested in starting, but hesitant also. I'm curious when the school will actually get their accredidation. I talked to recruiters from IU Health (which includes IU, Methodist, Riley) and they WILL NOT hire from a school w/out their NLNAC. St. V's & Hendricks are the same way. Are there any grads from this program that can chime in here? Thanks!
    Hannahbear,

    I am an ITT Tech grad from 12-2009. While it is true IU Health (previously Clarian Health) will not currently hire a ITT grads, that will change come July when the NLNAC announces the accreditation. I am a previous Clarian employee for several years and they would not even consider me although Indiana Clinic an affiliate did offer me a position that I turned down. ITT Tech Indianapolis has worked real hard for the NLNAC accreditation. Grads from my class currently work at St Vincent, St. Francis, St. Francis Hospital-Mooresvile/Beech Grove, Hancock Regional, Wishard, Dekalb Medical in GA, an ER in Louisville KY, various doctor offices in and around the Indianapolis metropolitan area, home care, with the department of corrections, and even for the State of Indiana. I had almost 30 people in my graduating class. Many work others places too. So finding a job after passing your NCLEX will not be a probably. If you are still worried, then just wait until after July to ensure that they will get NLNAC before you commit to anything. Do what is best for you. I hope that helped.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 0
    I agree, BUT it is also crazy trying to get into a community college in Oregon. I am a LPN and graduated from Pioneer Pacific College 4 years ago. I have been working on trying to get an LPN to RN bridge. NOTHING available. I have tried clackamas community college.....WHAT A JOKE. I'm enrolled in Excelsior, passed 2 prereq's (which i have to retake because PPC credits don't transfer) Oregon must be the worst state for collaboration between programs. You would think that with such a "SHORTAGE" of nurses that there would not be so much trouble getting your RN degree. I plan to get into whatever RN program I can that isn't a community college. Don't know what else to do.

    Sorry for the rant but 4 years of frustration built up...... Any suggestions?
  3. 0
    Quote from AmyORlpn
    I agree, BUT it is also crazy trying to get into a community college in Oregon. I am a LPN and graduated from Pioneer Pacific College 4 years ago. I have been working on trying to get an LPN to RN bridge. NOTHING available. I have tried clackamas community college.....WHAT A JOKE. I'm enrolled in Excelsior, passed 2 prereq's (which i have to retake because PPC credits don't transfer) Oregon must be the worst state for collaboration between programs. You would think that with such a "SHORTAGE" of nurses that there would not be so much trouble getting your RN degree. I plan to get into whatever RN program I can that isn't a community college. Don't know what else to do.

    Sorry for the rant but 4 years of frustration built up...... Any suggestions?
    One of the problems in OR, is that many CC's dropped their LPN to RN bridge programs when they went OCNE, so there are just less options than there were.
  4. 0
    Quote from AmyORlpn
    I agree, BUT it is also crazy trying to get into a community college in Oregon. I am a LPN and graduated from Pioneer Pacific College 4 years ago. I have been working on trying to get an LPN to RN bridge. NOTHING available. I have tried clackamas community college.....WHAT A JOKE. I'm enrolled in Excelsior, passed 2 prereq's (which i have to retake because PPC credits don't transfer) Oregon must be the worst state for collaboration between programs. You would think that with such a "SHORTAGE" of nurses that there would not be so much trouble getting your RN degree. I plan to get into whatever RN program I can that isn't a community college. Don't know what else to do.

    Sorry for the rant but 4 years of frustration built up...... Any suggestions?
    I understand your frustration, it took me 3 years of applications before I got into a program, many people I went to school with had tried up to 6 times, while others got in on their first try

    I just saw in the newsletter that OSBON puts out that Carrington has a LPN-RN bridge program. But there is no nursing shortage in OR, far from it. To get my first job I had to go to Vancouver
  5. 0
    Hi guys. ITT recently started an ADN program in Orland Park, Illinois, about 40 minutes from Chicago. I have attended the info session, taken the HESI (which was not bad, I scored an 88) and just today met with financial aid to go over tuition and such. I am just wondering if there is anyone out there who is currently in ITT's Orland Park program. According to the nursing director there, I have a very good chance of getting into the program to start this June because of my HESI score, and just wanted to know how current students like or dislike the program thus far?

    I have to say I never thought I would ever apply to a technical college but since I have applied to over 5 other colleges (community and universities) and have not gotten in this is a blessing!Yes, tuition is higher then a CC would be, but at this point I am willing to pay higher prices to get in right away.

    Also, everyone keeps saying your credits dont transfer and such. Once you have passed your state boards and have an RN license you can pretty much apply to most, not all, but most RN to BSN programs. The only credit that may not transfer are your basic Gen Eds, like english, math, psych....I wont have that problem because all of my Gen Eds were completed at my CC. But for those of you who are starting at ITT from scratch might run into this issue if you plan to go further in your education.

    Again, Anyone who is currently a ITT Orland Park, IL student any isight would be great!!! Thanks!
  6. 0
    Quote from Steener77
    webgrl, who are you?
    Hi Steener77, I'm Larina - who are you??
  7. 0
    Ah! Finally!! It's me, Christina
  8. 0
    Quote from bevtag
    I'm in the ITT program in Oklahoma City. I was in another nursing program in this city and making good grades, but the hatefulness and punitive attitude of the faculty put so much pressure on us, some of us couldn't take the stress. They treated us and accused us as if we were all cheaters. They watched our every move and tracked all our comments on the computers as that was the only way to communicate with the faculty. In lab, we had students teaching students. The school was terribly disorganized. The experience was so awful I had a nervous breakdown and almost committed suicide.

    The ITT classes meet once a week, but we've had med/surg clinicals twice a week, giving us more time on the floor, which is great! We read just as much in this program as I did in the other, but the teachers are more helpful and are happy to spend time with us one-on-one. We also aren't required to buy extra books to supplement (as we were in the other school). We don't have a long list of movies to watch on our days off (as I did in the other school). Our care plans aren't 20+ pages long and they're not critical of our care plans, but rather, sit down with us and talk about them. I love that I have access to my teachers anytime I need them. They give us their personal cell phone numbers on the first day of class.

    The classes are small enough that the teachers get to know us as humans: our strengths and weaknesses. They work with us and care about us. The program chairman knows each of us by name.

    Yes, it's horribly expensive, but I plan to be able to pay off the loan once I become employed. So far, we've left good impressions at the hospitals we've worked in. The nurses in one of the hospitals begged me to apply for a job, which means ITT has taught me effectively what I need to know to become a nurse.

    Our credits transfer only to the University of Phoenix, which, I heard, is in trouble for illegal financial dealings (I don't know).

    The HESI is a piece of cake. Just review your anatomy/physiology books before you take it and you'll do fine. HESI tests are given periodically throughout the program to make sure we're on track.

    The entire program is 27 months (or 9 quarters) with little time off. No summer breaks. The order of classes by quarter is:
    1. Introduction to Nursing
    2. Pharmacology and Fundamentals of Nursing
    3. Med/Surg I + clinical
    4. Med/Surg II + clinical
    5. Gerontology + clinical
    6. Mental Health + clinical
    7. OB/GYN + clinical
    8. Peds + clinical
    9. Leadership (don't know about clinical)

    Of course it's wise to check out every aspect of a program before you commit.

    Hope this helps you in whatever decision you make.
    Thank's for sharing your experience. My experience with _______ , an Oregon community college within the OCNE program, was similar to yours...only I didn't go suicidal. I did have what turned out to be, not heart attacks, but maybe anxiety attacks - due to faculty harassment. Maybe it should be considered a small blessing, that such disturbed nurse educators are abusing healthy nursing students, instead of injured and ill patients....allthough at least patients have legal rights and advocy groups to defend them?

    I was an A student in an Oregon nursimg program...until I was denied the right to take my finals. They can do that, I discovered, if a nurse educator dosen't like something about you. They also don't have to teach you, if they don't want to, but you still have to pay your tuition and go to clinicals. If an Oregon nursing student injures a patient, it is not the nurse educator's problem. It's the student's problem - we were told. Fortunately, I'm an experienced CNA and so my patients were safe. Not all students in this nursing program did have CNA experiences...

    According to my nursing educator, if you hold Prolife views, you "cannot make rational decisions, and just cannot cut it as an RN." ...this is what my Oregon nurse educator told me.

    I know. Those who are wiser than me would say I should have known not to take DNA as indication of species, and not to have admitted to having personal Prolife tendancies, when asked. Or maybe I should have lied. I'm not much good at lying, though. I should have known this, when other nurse educators in my program made claims that; "...the fetus is not human, until the cord is clampped. It is a parasite." and ..."It has been scientifically proven (by Dr. Emoto of "What the Bleep!!...Down the Rabit Hole" assigned NUR preparation materinals in one Oregon nursing program,) that we can change physical matter with our thoughts." It's OK. Call me stuppid. I told them to give my seat to someone else, because that is one phsychological circus of horrors, that I do not wish to join again. However, I now deeply regret not asking what exact species the human fetus is, before the magic of a clamp turns it into a human species..... I doubt I will ever find that answer in any scientifically based book, and now I don't know what the answer is ....if it should come up on the NCLEX. I'd seriously, like to know what species of parasite I was carrying, when I was pregnant with my child....?

    The program I was in, was what I would call, a phsychological circus of horrors. I would gladdly pay twice the cost of ITT Tech, to get a real, and a serious nursing education. I did not see that happening, at the Oregon community college program I was in. I just want a chance to be the best RN I can be - without being discriminated against for my personal views. If they hadn't gone out of their way to find out, they would never have known. Based my personal experience with OCNE, I cannot reccommend the OCNE program to anyone. I am more than willing to pay many times more for a nursing education with ITT, because I expect I will get more:
    • More respect as a human being (species)
    • A higher quality of science in medicine
    • Higher quality educational resources
    • More of an example of high ethics
    • More quality time from my instructors
    • ...and yes, more hands on Technology in medicine - medicine is heavily influenced by technology, and I can think of no better educator for nursing, than an institution with a long standing history in technology training. If nursing is not about techniques and technologies, then what is it about?

    If not one single healthcare agency wants to hire me in all of the United States, and not one sigle college wants to accept me into a BSN program in the United States, because my nursing education is from ITT Tech - that is their perogative and that is their loss - because I intend to leave no stone unturned to become the best RN I can be. ITT graduates have to take the exact same exams as the rest of nation. If an ITT Tech nursing graduate is willing to take greater chances, to ay more, and to pass higher bars than other nursing students just to become an RN, why discredit their degree? That's silly. If no one wants me with my nursing skills in all fo the United States, I will take my nursing education and migrate to another country - a third world country, if I have to. I want to become a nurse. A real nurse, and a good nurse.

    I cannot say that I understand why there is such hostility toward ITT's nursing program. Given the projected nursing shortages, I'd expect everyone would be happy to see a new nursing program in town, expecially the hospitals. I did attend a community college nursing program in Oregon. I wouldn't return to it, if tuition were free. If I had to guess, I might say people are hostile toward ITT Tech's nursing program, because people from established programs are afraid of a little honest competition. Maybe they are afraid ITT Tech might raise the standard, and turn out better techically skilled nurses, because technology is right down ITT Tech's alley. Maybe they are afraid the best students will chose ITT first, if ITT is the only show in town not abusing their students. What I do know is this, I've demonstrated that I can do A level work in a "traditional nursing program", and I could not be happier to have the free choice in where to get my nursing education. I can chose to become a nurse, while chosing not be abused and defrauded of an education I paid for. I can chose ITT Tech. I am very happy that ITT Tech has a nursing program. I have no problem paying more. I believe I am getting more.
  9. 0
    Well MicheleMA,

    I can't give info on instructors or ITT clinicals, yet. However, I've been through orientation at ITT and orientation in an OCNE program. I can tell you that in orientation, the ITT program went over all of the ways they would be available to help the students learn and succeed. THey also walked us around the school, to personally introduce students to all of the people, in all of the different departments that students could go to for assistance.

    My experience with the OCNE college program orientation I attended, was most memorable to me for the nurse educators' statements regarding how phsychological councelors were mandatory, because all students would be taken apart mentally. Phsychological councelors would be necesssary to put us back together again. ...I don't really think the OCNE educators cared much about the putting you back together again part....but they really did seem to be into the taking apart buisness...in my opinion.

    I have not made it to clinicals yet at ITT, because ITT students don't go to clinicals until they've had at least three terms of training and education. However, OCNE, is very proud about how they throw their students alone onto the floor in clinicals, first term. Don't look for much faculty support in that first term. Nursing is not for the weak. The term I attended, one of our skills labs was scheduled for the Monday following the last clincal date for all students. All of the students in that cohort, performed that skill before it was signed off in their pass books.

    I understand that nurse educators in Oregon are no longer accountable for nursing student errors on the floor - My clinical leader put it this way; "It's not my license, if you mess-up! It's your licenses! So you'd all better say something if you don't know how to do something." (...if you don't have some kind of healthcare safety training, you may not know what questions to be asking - especially in your first term of nursing school....) My clinical leader didn't seem to care so much about patient safety, as she did about not being accountable for her students' performances.

    If you don't at least have a CNA, be very careful in OCNE clincals, because the prep for clinicals is extremely minimal, and may not come until AFTER the clinicals you perform your skills in - which can get YOU in a lot of hot water. All those people complaining about how boring it is to repeat CNA safety stuff - I would have given anything to be them.
  10. 0
    MadeinOregon...

    OHSU would not be interested in hiring ITT students. OHSU only hires ONCE students - Supposedly, this is the main incentive for all of the community colleges in Oregon - as well Clark Community in Washington State -to join OCNE. If OHSU were hiring any non-OCNE graduates... that would be a very interesting thing to learn....very interesting...

    I've heard from OCNE Students that very few OCNE students articulate into OHSU's BSN program. I heard less than 1%...but that is so low....I question the number, but not that the actual number is very low. Could this be because OCNE students aren't able to compete with the required grades, or is there another reason? Incoming students should be from roughly the same pool of students as the rest of Oregon. so OCNE program average GPA's should be comparably as high. If they are not, it would be interesting to hear why they are different.

    I don't know what the percentage is of OCNE graduates being hired by OHSU. I'd guess it is also low. If community colleges are joining OCNE, in the interest of landing jobs for their graduates, surely someone would have chrunched these numbers? There have to be far more OCNE graduates than OHSU can take in. Although, this may be good news, PCC seems to be shrinking their program from the previous 100 seats, to 80 or less on entry. This should lend itself to fewer graduates coming out of PCC.

    Perhaps the decrease in PCC graduates will be helpful for OCNE students competing for the few open slots at OHSU? OHSU would clearly be hiring even fewer OCNE students, if they were hiring graduates outside the OCNE system. If OHSU is hiring graduates outside of OCNE, this would be very interesting information because it would mean that OCNE students must compete more for the decreased open slots.

    OCNE courses don't transfer to other nursing programs outside of OCNE, either. Once you start an OCNE program, you are locked into OCNE. The majority of your coures are lost if you don't graduate from OCNE. OCNE courses as especially taylored to OCNE, and most, cannot transfer to colleges or Universities outside of OCNE. OCNE, is "special".

    ITT is not OCNE, and this is the appeal of ITT. No matter where an RN receives a degree from, chances are some classes will be too old, or otherwise will need to be retaken. Many programs may even require additional course work regardless of where you've been to school. ITT grads take the same national exam as everyone else, and they have to meet the same requirements of regulators. OHSU, while very respected, is not the only provider of BSN's in the nation.

    If OHSU and only OHSU will do for your future employer and educator, OCNE is for you and you should avoid all non-OCNE programs...but it may be a very good idea to find out what your statistical chances are of 1) Getting through the program and finishing with competitive grades needed to enter a BSN program, and 2) Actually getting a seat in OHSU's program as an OCNE graduate, and 3) Acutally being hired by OHSU, as an OCNE graduate.

    If you are looking at going into a BSN, your grades will matter - even at OHSU and as an OCNE student. Most people going into OCNE programs are capable of A level work. What is the average grade coming out of OCNE programs?

    Could lower grades be the reason so many OCNE graduates don't articulate into OHSU's BSN program? It would be interesting to know. If so, I doubt other BSN programs will be interested in giving extra points for lower academic performances compared to other programs - just because you graduated from a "special" OCNE program.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top