Etiquette in the OR? - page 4

by RN in training

11,943 Views | 35 Comments

Hey nurses! I was wondering...I had the opportunity to go down the OR with my pt last week (I'm a NS). This pt was very sweet and easy tempered...in preop, the surgeon, anesthesiologist, CRNA and circulating nurse all came by at... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from giveface
    I have to say, she raised a legitimate concern here (i.e., injuring [or from the sounds of it re-injuring] her shoulder), and you chose to write her up instead? Perhaps she said it one too many times, perhaps it was insensitive, but to me that is a valid objection and if my supervisor just overlooked my concern for my own physical safety there would be A LOT of questions to answer afterwards. You cannot just overlook someone's concern for their physical safety. Sorry.
    I totally get what you're saying, but it sounds to me like she had already said she would take care of it and there was no further need to mention the pt's size. Just how I read it maybe...
    aachavez likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from Anisettes
    I've seen this happen quite a few times and I don't like it either. It's more than gossiping, it's something more, another level entirely and I don't like it. I have a strong personality (re: a *****, if you like) and I call people on their crap. There's no excuse and no reason for it.

    I had this patient once - a big, good-looking, strapping fireman who had come in for a scrotal mass. Well, he's out and I uncover him to shave/prep and turns out he's got a micro penis. The tech turns around, see this and bursts out laughing, saying how she's going to 'tell everybody'. I was so p*ssed, I said that if I heard word one out of her mouth about it or that if I heard anyone else was talking about it, I would write her ass up so fast and take it as far up as I had to.

    It's one thing to vent about the behavior of difficult patients, it's something else entirely to rag on a naked, vulnerable human being's body. Our bodies are so closely tied into our self-esteem and who we are, that it's something so beyond gossip. It's reprehensible. And should never be tolerated by anyone with a conscience. I find it especially disgusting that people were so kind to this patient prior to her being anesthetized. Shame on everyone who participated.


    Im shocked at how unproffesionl these guys were... In the OR, when the patient is knocked out, I can understand some off color comments as a coping mechanism, or any other department for that matter. Dealing with death, dying, sickness, it's draining and having a sense of humor about it helps deal with the stresses of the day. BUT patients still deserve dignity even if they are unconscious! Being overweight and having hirsutism myself (PCOS) I'm mortified for myself and I wasnt even there! God I hope I never have surgery I'll be far to worried about what the techs are saying about me! Im self consious enough as it is!!!!

    ARGHHH!!! Im just still in shock over reading how insensitive and unproffesional people can be. You can bet your tail that won't fly when I'm around.
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    And I hope you act like that to ANY nurse who talks about a patient in such a manner, even if they are in the break room or at the end of a shift. Coming from working on the floor, the OR nurses are a LOT better than some other areas in the hospital. Where I worked before, the nurses were much nastier when talking about the patients. And they had them all day and made comments about patient personalities, family members, personal hygiene habits, you name it. At least in the OR, you dont "know" the patients well enough to gossip about their particular personality traits.

    All I'm trying to say is that if you are this upset about the situation in the OR, you better be just as upset if a floor/ICU/tele/home health/SNF nurse complains about her patients being overweight or annoying or anything. just sayin....
    aachavez likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from PureLifeRN
    And I hope you act like that to ANY nurse who talks about a patient in such a manner, even if they are in the break room or at the end of a shift. Coming from working on the floor, the OR nurses are a LOT better than some other areas in the hospital. Where I worked before, the nurses were much nastier when talking about the patients. And they had them all day and made comments about patient personalities, family members, personal hygiene habits, you name it. At least in the OR, you dont "know" the patients well enough to gossip about their particular personality traits.

    All I'm trying to say is that if you are this upset about the situation in the OR, you better be just as upset if a floor/ICU/tele/home health/SNF nurse complains about her patients being overweight or annoying or anything. just sayin....
    You said it! I know it can be incredibly frustrating, but patients are people, and deserve respect and dignity.
    RN in training likes this.
  5. 2
    Quote from azcna
    I'm glad I don't work where you work :/
    WORD. Ick. :/

    OP, I am right there with you. I am disgusted by what you encountered. It's one thing to be frustrated by a patient's weight - and yes, I've been there, as we all have - and I understand the need for special equipment and all that, but that does not sound at all like that's what this was. This was malice, plain and simple. Going up and shaking their belly?! Really?! Could not be more unprofessional.

    I would have had no qualms about saying something if I witnessed something like that, but I can definitely see your hesitation being a student. I think you should go to the manager, though. That is something they want to hear. If nothing else, they don't want to hear that a potential future employee, or even a future patient or loved one of a future patient, would be turned off of the place because of their rude and unprofessional staff. It shouldn't happen ever, but its particularly sad that they should be good representations of their facility to someone visiting their department, such as yourself.

    The only similar thing I've seen happen is that one of our anesthesiologists always used the acronym "FLK" or would talk about how ugly some of our kids are. Someone ended up reporting her for that. Management was not okay with it. So, I think you should say something. Chances are they will be shocked and embarassed by it.

    Dignity is important. Maybe it's my floor nurse training, but in the OR I still cover up the patient when we're not working. Someone gave me a funny look for doing that one time, and all I said is, "Respect patient dignity." They were taken aback. But I've seen other OR nurses do the same thing. This sounds like a particularly bad place - take comfort in that we're not all like that.

    "Treat others the way you want to be treated." We learned that one in kindergarten, people. Sad that some "professionals" are more immature than 6 year olds.
    Last edit by ChristineAdrianaRN on Feb 19, '12
    Do-over and RN in training like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from ChristineAdrianaRN
    WORD. Ick. :/OP, I am right there with you. I am disgusted by what you encountered. It's one thing to be frustrated by a patient's weight - and yes, I've been there, as we all have - and I understand the need for special equipment and all that, but that does not sound at all like that's what this was. This was malice, plain and simple. Going up and shaking their belly?! Really?! Could not be more unprofessional.I would have had no qualms about saying something if I witnessed something like that, but I can definitely see your hesitation being a student. I think you should go to the manager, though. That is something they want to hear. If nothing else, they don't want to hear that a potential future employee, or even a future patient or loved one of a future patient, would be turned off of the place because of their rude and unprofessional staff. It shouldn't happen ever, but its particularly sad that they should be good representations of their facility to someone visiting their department, such as yourself.The only similar thing I've seen happen is that one of our anesthesiologists always used the acronym "FLK" or would talk about how ugly some of our kids are. Someone ended up reporting her for that. Management was not okay with it. So, I think you should say something. Chances are they will be shocked and embarassed by it.Dignity is important. Maybe it's my floor nurse training, but in the OR I still cover up the patient when we're not working. Someone gave me a funny look for doing that one time, and all I said is, "Respect patient dignity." They were taken aback. But I've seen other OR nurses do the same thing. This sounds like a particularly bad place - take comfort in that we're not all like that."Treat others the way you want to be treated." We learned that one in kindergarten, people. Sad that some "professionals" are more immature than 6 year olds.
    Hah! It never occurred to me that I could say something to a manager... Hmmm... Thanks for the idea!!

    And ps your response is excellent. Patient dignity. So simple and so right on. No need for further words or explanation and can't be argued. Patient dignity. Yeah!
    Last edit by RN in training on Feb 19, '12 : Reason: Left something out


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