What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby? - page 229

Hi, I was wondering about some of those weird names that you've probably encountered in L&D and PP. I remember when I had my maternity rotation a couple of weeks ago, one of the nurses said she... Read More

  1. by   ElvishDNP
    The community pool I went to growing up was called Eamon Park, and it was pronounced EE-mon. But if I had to guess how to pronounce a boy's name, I'd go with the Irish pronunciation of the 'ea' sound. Eamon....Seamus....etc.
  2. by   sharpeimom
    Quote from rn/writer
    the irish pronunciation is "ay-mon." rhymes with damon. i've never heard it said any other way.

    can't understand why anyone would be offended that you asked how to pronounce a not-so-common name. unless they were interpreting your inquiry as a dig for choosing it.

    here is a link to a website about eamon de valera a prominent figure in irish politics for more than 50 years:

    http://www.apostles.com/devalera.html
    Quote from elvish
    the community pool i went to growing up was called eamon park, and it was pronounced ee-mon. but if i had to guess how to pronounce a boy's name, i'd go with the irish pronunciation of the 'ea' sound. eamon....seamus....etc.

    thank you both so very much. their first baby is an adorable little redheaded toddler named nieve.
    when her baby brother didn't come by his due date, she put her halloween costume on "because he'll want to see me in it and will come out." he didn't!

    thanks for your help. i'll email the good word.
  3. by   rn/writer
    Is the little girl's name spelled Nieve? I ask because the Irish spelling for the name that sounds like that is, "Niamh." I kid you not. "Mh" in Irish Gaelic has a "v" sound.
  4. by   sharpeimom
    Quote from rn/writer
    is the little girl's name spelled nieve? i ask because the irish spelling for the name that sounds like that is, "niamh." i kid you not. "mh" in irish gaelic has a "v" sound.
    they pronounce her name as though it were spelled "neeve" but spell it nieve. modernized, maybe?
    i was named for my great grandmother whose name used the dutch spelling katharine. my parents changed it to katherine, thinking they'd save me a lifetime of aggravation. maybe my goddaughter and her husband did that too. they met while on semesters abroad in ireland and both came home much more aware of their irish heritages.
  5. by   rn/writer
    Probably trying to save her some aggravation, as well.

    Another popular name is, "Siobhan," pronounced "Sha-vawn." In Ireland, people wouldn't bat an eye, but over here it would be butchered for sure.
  6. by   SeeTheMoon
    I named my son Collin, to give credit for my family's Irish history. I used the surname spelling though, to avoid him being called 'colon' like 'colin Powell'. (there are several that use the traditional c-o-l-i-n Irish spelling but pronounce it 'colon'.) But what do I get? People either still call him 'colon' or spell it Colin. Could be worse though, I guess!
  7. by   FoodieJ
    Quote from rn/writer
    Probably trying to save her some aggravation, as well.

    Another popular name is, "Siobhan," pronounced "Sha-vawn." In Ireland, people wouldn't bat an eye, but over here it would be butchered for sure.
    hehehe... i work with someone named Siobhan, and I call her SiO-Ba-Han, as a joke of course, because thats how you do want to say it when first seeing her badge. She says to her parents credit, no one ever forgets her name once they learn the correct pronunciation.
  8. by   rph3664
    Quote from rn/writer
    Probably trying to save her some aggravation, as well.

    Another popular name is, "Siobhan," pronounced "Sha-vawn." In Ireland, people wouldn't bat an eye, but over here it would be butchered for sure.
    The 80s pop group Bananarama had a member named Siobhan, and when my sister heard the local DJs wonder how this name was pronounced, called them up and told them. She didn't know anyone with that name, but I did and had told her the actual pronunciation.

    The singer Enya's first name is actually spelled Eithne but that's how it's pronounced.
  9. by   FlyingScot
    Quote from rn/writer
    Is the little girl's name spelled Nieve? I ask because the Irish spelling for the name that sounds like that is, "Niamh." I kid you not. "Mh" in Irish Gaelic has a "v" sound.
    I speak rudimentary Gaelic (Scottish) and believe me the "Mh" pronounciation is just the tip of the iceburg. Seriously, there are some words that have 3 or more consenants strung together that are absolutely silent depending on the vowels that come before or after. It's massively confusing. Plus the alphabet is shorter. Egad, I'll never learn it. BTW...Eamon is most definitely pronounced "Ay-mon". I rather like it.
  10. by   FoodieJ
    Quote from FlyingScot
    I speak rudimentary Gaelic (Scottish) and believe me the "Mh" pronounciation is just the tip of the iceburg. Seriously, there are some words that have 3 or more consenants strung together that are absolutely silent depending on the vowels that come before or after. It's massively confusing. Plus the alphabet is shorter. Egad, I'll never learn it. BTW...Eamon is most definitely pronounced "Ay-mon". I rather like it.
    Look at that Sharpiemom, i think you have a consensus. You can proudly call the new parents and congratulate them on the birth of little Ay-mon and be confident...

    who would have known


    I recently did my nephews easter list with him, and had to consistently ask what sex the names of the classmates were in order to determine which valentine to assign them. he didn't understand why i thought it was so funny, i guess the days of Michael and Jessica are over! unless its JeySiKA!
  11. by   FlyingScot
    Quote from FoodieJ
    I recently did my nephews easter list with him, and had to consistently ask what sex the names of the classmates were in order to determine which valentine to assign them.
    So is giving valentines at Easter a new tradition?
  12. by   morte
    Quote from rn/writer
    Probably trying to save her some aggravation, as well.

    Another popular name is, "Siobhan," pronounced "Sha-vawn." In Ireland, people wouldn't bat an eye, but over here it would be butchered for sure.
    aye, unless ye watched "Ryan's hope" in the 80's///
  13. by   FoodieJ
    Quote from FlyingScot
    So is giving valentines at Easter a new tradition?


    duh.... chomping away at my 1lb solid bunny while writing a post about v-day confused me. thanks for the catch though!

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