What doctors do that bugs you... - page 2

1. in our nursery, the charge nurse assists the pedi while rounding. there's this one pedi who will ask questions about a baby (was mom's gbs neg., etc.) as she is looking through his/her chart. ... Read More

  1. by   BSNtobe2009
    I just wanted to say that I read this entire thread and I am just floored at what goes on at some of the hospitals.

    I'm not a nurse yet, but I have seen one friend of mine that had a baby that was suctioned out. I just assumed that she had trouble delivering (because again, I have never seen a baby delivered like that before), she said, "No, that is just how he does it."

    Now I realize that nature just needs to take it's course.

    Running into incompetent doctors (once I learn and gain experience) is going to be the most difficult part of nursing for me, especially since I want to work in NICU. I mean, you have to allow yourself to get desensitized to an extent, otherwise you would just die every time you see something bad happen to a baby, but how some doctors treat people, and in this case babies, like objects is frightening.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Yes, it can be quite demoralizing, seeing what goes on in some hospitals at the hands of some obstetricians. It's almost driven me away from hospital nursing altogether, in the past.

    There, for me, is a silver lining in all of this: I find working with midwives one of the most rewarding and educational things I have ever done as a nurse. For those who are looking into a change, or are not yet nurses, my advice would be to look into working in a place that has a high number of midwives on staff. Really, this is the best way to go, IMO, after 9 years as an RN, having worked in 4 different hospitals.
  3. by   33-weeker
    Quote from rgn1
    sounds like it would be better if you had proper midwives. here in the uk the doctor only gets called if a woman gets into difficulties. otherwise the trained midwives take care of the whole thing & they are much more in tune with what your body needs because that's how they are trained.
    last i read, the us is rivaled only by canada where medicalization of the birth process is concerned. we are actually quite low on the list of industrialized countires when it comes to infant and maternal morbidity and mortality stats. the countries that fair the best are the ones where midwives are in charge, and birth is natural in most cases - without a doctor in the room.

    the only thing the us is better at is saving the tiny preemies, but that's because we get more practice at it. the average, healthy woman is nearly twice as likely to deliver her baby prematurely if she is cared for by an obstetrician than if she were cared for by a midwife. that fact is sobering to say the least.

    the ratio of doctors to midwives is opposite of what it should be in this country -- not becuse of safety (as the obs would have us think) but because of money and politics.
    kudos to all you midwives out there.

    yes, some of us do know the truth!
  4. by   33-weeker
    boy... this thread has really taken an interesting path. these threads have a life of their own.
  5. by   pudden_head
    Hi, new to this... I'm fairly new to nursing but I HATE when the doctors ...
    1- remove a patients dressing/packing without telling me or another nurse
    2-tell the patient they can go home but don't write discharge orders
    3-tell the patient one thing and document/order another
    4-ignore your concerns about a patient until its too late and then take credit for saving them...arghh
    5-playing with pain pumps or other pumps when they obviously don't have a clue what they are doing... then wonder why the patient is having difficulties
  6. by   33-weeker
    sometimes docs realize their mistakes & do a little sheepish crawfishing.

    when i was a new nurse and not as assertive with the docs as i would be nowadays... i had a rather young, avg.size, post-hyst. patient once who couldn't settle down and get comfortable post-op. she was on a demerol pca with typical settings, but no luck.

    i had just shoooed the visitors out, turned down the tv, and explained that she would probably drop off to sleep if the room was less stimulating. i told hubby to either take the phone off the hook or catch it on the first ring. even so, she still was restless and rating her pain high - but normal findings otherwise.

    about that same time, due to my call for something more, the resident ordered a bolus of 100mg (!). he came in and was standing over her bed talking to her and her husband as i began to administer it via the pca.

    i looked up at him and said, "um... i'm going to administer this in 25mg incriments, if that's ok with you." he kind of blew me off in a mildly irritated way, but agreed. (like yeah...whatever)

    shortly after the first bolus of 25mg went in, the pt. -- who had been involved in the conversation with her doctor -- rolled her head to one side on her pillow, closed her eyes and became totally oblivious to all of us. she was fine, just medicated and finally comfortable. (allthough, i must say, i checked on her frequently for a while afterwards just to be sure.)

    i watched the resident's facial expression as he watched the patient promptly drift off, trying not to let his shock/surprise show. he knew immediately that i had just saved his butt bigtime. he followed me back to the desk like a little puppy... "what did you say... 25mg incriments... i'll write that order right away."

    Last edit by 33-weeker on Oct 18, '06
  7. by   MS._Jen_RN
    I don't work OB, but I hope I can play. . .
    I hate it when the MD downsizes a patient's trach and leaves the old one laying on top of the dresser with secretions drying to it (and not telling anyone of course). I found it several hours later. Gross.
    ~Jen
    (for those whose MDs leave sharps for you to clean up, there should be, and most likly is a way for you to report/write up that. If not only through OSHA- not safe.)
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Docs that breathe and speak.

    (No it wasn't a good day at C-section Land today lol)
  9. by   NJNursing
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I would be discussing the high station suctions and multiple pop-offs with your manager/risk mgt department. These are blatantly negligent violations of standard of care. The maximum acceptable number of pop-offs is more like 2-3 and NO MORE. Seems to me, there is a real problem there w/some of your docs. Some day, someone is gonna get hurt and badly...and you may be called to give a deposition. Scary thought. BTDT, several years ago, myself. I have learned since then.
    Our facilities policy is only 3 applications and the person who applied it 7 times was the CHIEF OF STAFF in maternity. I think he let the Baby Story episodes go to his head.
  10. by   smk1
    Not a nurse yet, but when i was in L&D and the subsequent sick baby nursery for Olivia, I noticed 2 doctors who changed diapers and DID NOT WASH THEIR HANDS! Now I know it was just meconium...but come on!

    (I now recognize that it was probably rare for a doctor to change a diaper anyway, so I guess it was "nice" of him, but still gross)
  11. by   ItsyBitsySpider
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Yes, it can be quite demoralizing, seeing what goes on in some hospitals at the hands of some obstetricians. It's almost driven me away from hospital nursing altogether, in the past.

    There, for me, is a silver lining in all of this: I find working with midwives one of the most rewarding and educational things I have ever done as a nurse. For those who are looking into a change, or are not yet nurses, my advice would be to look into working in a place that has a high number of midwives on staff. Really, this is the best way to go, IMO, after 9 years as an RN, having worked in 4 different hospitals.
    I've been wondering how midwives are compared with MD's. Many nurses on my unit are pregnant and go to an OB group that has a midwife on staff. None of them want to see her or have her deliver their babies. I don't think it's anything personal, but they all feel more comfortable with the MD's. I think it would be great. Would you, or have you, had a midwife previously? Just curious.
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I would go to a midwife for prenatal care if I could. However, I never had the opportunity when I was "low risk" and when I had my daughter, I was considered "high risk" for several reasons, so I was seeing an OB then. BUT believe me; midwives are very competent to deliver quality prenatal and well woman care to most women across the continuum from menarche to menopause and beyond. Why people would not see a midwife mystifies me, unless they are high risk or have a specific prejudice against them, I just can't understand it. They are wonderful!
  13. by   33-weeker
    Quote from itsybitsyspider
    i've been wondering how midwives are compared with md's. many nurses on my unit are pregnant and go to an ob group that has a midwife on staff. none of them want to see her or have her deliver their babies. i don't think it's anything personal, but they all feel more comfortable with the md's. i think it would be great. would you, or have you, had a midwife previously? just curious.
    just as in any profession, there are good, bad and so-so midwives. do pick a good one.

    i saw great midwifes for both my pregnancies and births (and for one miscarriage in between). they never spent less than 45 min. with me at a visit. both had realxed offices in their homes. they did all the stuff like at the ob's - b/p, weigh, dip urine, listen to baby, etc.. - but in a relaxed manner and with a more personal attitude.

    the second one even had me write down what i ate for two weeks and looked over it to tell me where i needed to make changes in my diet. (this was for my twins - she said the quickest way to make a baby come out to soon is to feed him/them poorly!)

    they brought oxygen and a bag & mask for baby and a mask for me to the births, as well as pitocin for im after if needed. i got scripts for the baby meds and methergine and had them on hand by 36 weeks, along with the birth kit i ordered and some other general supplies.

    every thing was wonderful! i'd do it again if i was going to have more kids. the pnc was head and shoulders above any ob, and the midwives have far better birth stats than obs.

    find me an ob with a less-than-5% c-section rate, a 1% epis rate, nothing worse than 2nd degree tears, and who will spend a minimum of 30 minutes with me per visit, and we'll talk.
    Last edit by 33-weeker on Oct 19, '06

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