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33-weeker

33-weeker

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33-weeker has 20+ years experience.

33-weeker's Latest Activity

  1. 33-weeker

    The realities of Safe Harbor

    I'm curious about cases where nurses have invoked Safe Habor and what their experience was with that. Is it a career killer? Supposedly, the employer can't retaliate if it's done in good faith, but I can't imagine the powers that be would be happy about it. Anyone have any stories to share?
  2. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    Had a baby recently by the name 'Dinky.' Nope. Wasn't a nickname. It was his on-the-BC given name. Apparently it's dad's real name, too. Poor kid. He'll be teased.
  3. 33-weeker

    questioning postpartum nursing?

    I'm sure things have changed since I graduated in '91, but the way I got into a specialty area right out of school was going through an 'acute care women's health residency' that consisted of classroom and clinical rotations through areas like L&D, PP, Nursery I & II, Antepartum, Gyn, etc... Those of us who passed (there were some tests, but I don't think anyone failed) interviewed for the places we wanted to work and were hired into the various areas with a 2-year committment in exchange for the program. Except for taking a 10 mo. break doing Gyn (to get the shift I needed), I've worked in nursery ever since.
  4. 33-weeker

    questioning postpartum nursing?

    I'd like to add to this, as a neonatal nurse of 20 years, that thinking of PP patients as 'healthy' is painting them all with the same brush, and potentially dangerous. Yes. It's true. Most of them are young and healthy, but even those can turn into an ICU case at any time. New moms frequently faint, so they are an even a bigger fall risk that first time to the bathroom than the elderly. They can bleed out faster than you can say 'post partum hemorrhage.' They can have seizures, too, that compromise both them and baby. Not only that, many have chronic health issues like diabetes that must be monitored an cared for. Maybe choosing PP/FBC does limit your career options, but--just like newborn nursery--if you think it's all fun and games and easy, healthy patients, think again.
  5. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    I wonder if they'd still choose 'Premarin' if they knew it came from 'pregnant mare urine'? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Premarin
  6. 33-weeker

    Parents of kids with autism, please read

    Maybe I'm strange, but I don't mind 'labels' as long as the diagnosis is accurate. (I think the 'don't label my child' thing has become a cliche concept that people parrot without really thinking it through.) I see the label as a comfort, because it helps me focus on what I need to do to fix it or at least treat it. I was actually relieved when my first child was diagnosed, because it meant I wasn't a bad parent. Her delays did have an organic cause. [My parents had fussed at me for not reading to her enough (she wouldn't sit still for it) and my dad thought her delayed speech was because I let her watch Teletubbies.] My parents are educated people, but parents always seem to look for blame with their kids, because they continue to see us as 'kids' and not responsible adults. Anyhow... I've never hidden from my kids that they are dx with autism, but I also don't treat them like they are damaged or retarded or (pick your adjective). I love them and treat them like the smart, capable kids they are, and --while I try and plan for the possibilities of them having trouble or needing help later in life-- I try not to assume they can't do something or assume they won't achieve things in the future. I've done that easier with autistic child number two after watching the radical changes in number one and knowing I shouldn't judge their future abilities/functioning level by the present. I truly feel how we treat them is far more important than the effect labels have. That is what determines how they view themselves, not some diagnosis printed in some file. And I don't know about things there, but here, they must have a label to get certain services. It is the diagnosing that qualifies them for the modifications and therapies they need. So I say, bring it on. Call them 'purple polkadotted' if you have too, just help them and get them what they need. Regarding their dx, I don't say things in front of their friends (I leave that up to them), but I do mention it to other parents when appropriate. And I try to say things that give them a positive attitude in the process, too. "You know, we're real proud of [daughter]. It's hard to believe she didn't have any functional language at the age of three. She's come a long way since then." That comment is usually met with raised eyebrows, a look of pleasant surprise and an agreeing nod. The symptoms I saw were: extreme stranger phobia from about 4 months in the first child, then words without true communication followed by increasingly odd and aloof behavior and poor eye contact by a year and a half. The second child was better about trying to communicate; he just didn't have the words. But after a while, as the first one came slowly back out of her shell, he progressively became more 'Rainman-ish'. Though there are similarities, they each manifest their autism (PDD NOS, to be specific) differently. Hope this helps.
  7. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    FWIW, I believe this word is derived from one that means 'honey'.
  8. 33-weeker

    Parents of kids with autism, please read

    I disagree with the statement that the pedi is the best resource for getting autism diagnosed. In my experience, most are rather clueless when it comes to pinning down specifics like that. I am the mother of two kids with autism spectrum disorders (now ages 10.5 and 13) and I have been a nursery/NICU nurse for 20 years. I'll tell you about my experience and you can do with the info what you like. FWIW- I do think it is possible for a child to have global damage/impairment and also have autism . I babysat a girl like that once. (She had a rough time and low apgars at birth. My kids did not.) In Texas, a group called ECI (early childhood intervention) will come into your home and evaluate your child for delays. Although they won't diagnose, they will offer services/therapy and or suggestions as appropriate for your child according to their findings. Check your state's services. There is probably something like this available. Then, (in TX) when the child turns three, the school district takes over and you can request an evaluation. My kids got in under 'language delay/impairment' and were later evaluated by the school's team for autism, once the staff had time to see them in action and secure permission for the necessary testing. I was satisfied with their evals and did not seek an outside diagnoses, although I could have for $$$. (At that time, ECI and the school services were free. Last I heard, ECI now charges fees on a sliding scale.) I encourage you to see what's out there and make use of the services available to you. I personally never involved my children's doctor until after the diagnosis was made, then sought one who tested them for heavy metals and prescribed oral chelation (which I think helped). She also gave us medical waivers for vaccines (we don't vaccinate -- and don't slam me over that -- it is with much research beforehand and with our doctor's blessing.). I also involved a child psychiatrist to prescribe the ADHD and other related medications one of them needs. Anyhow, get involved in groups around you of other parents who've dealt with autism. They can be a fountain of information and support for you. And when it comes to stuff like this, NEVER take your pedi's advice as the last word or only word on the subject. They are smart and they care, but they are rarely that specialized. Seek a multitude of wise counselors, and all the parents dealing with similar things you can find. Good luck.
  9. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    Maybe she shoulda named the kid 'Hemabate'.
  10. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    You misspelled 'Oranjello'.
  11. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    This is from the 'instructions on completing a birth certificate' in Texas: "1. Child's Name First Name: Enter the infant's first name. If the parents have not selected a given name for the infant, enter "Infant." Do not enter the last name of the mother as the child's first name. Do not leave this item blank. Middle Name: Enter the infant's middle name, and any names other than First and Last. If there is no middle name, leave this item blank; do not enter NMI, NMN, etc. Last Name: Enter the infant's last name. The child's last name does not have to be the same as either parent. [emphasis mine] Also enter any suffixes following the last name. ' No numerical names, obscenities, or non-alphabetic characters are permitted. [emphasis mine]Parents may name the infant any name they desire as long as it will fit in the space provided on the certificate. The entry may be "double-decked" if necessary. The parent(s) do not have to give the child their surname; for instance John Jones and Mary Brown, husband and wife, may name their child Tommy Green, Jr. A mother may give her child a supposed father's name without his name appearing on the birth certificate as the father. A last name may be hyphenated, as in Jones-Brown."
  12. 33-weeker

    Total hip replacement and leg length.

    I think now that most of it was 'apparent' discrepancy, because it has gotten much better with PT and time. My mom waited until her hip was really bad before getting it done (a '11' on a scale of 10, the surgeon said). The surrounding muscles, etc., had shortened quite a bit. Problem was, she didn't realize the inner thigh pain she was feeling was her hip. She thought it had something to do with the arth. surgery she had done on her knee and just suffered with it until she couldn't stand it anymore. She's getting around without even a cane now. Oh, get this... My dad fell a few weeks ago and refused to go get seen. He walked with mom's old walker for 5 days until she finally made him go get checked out. He had broken a hip, but somehow it had not displaced. They were able to put three screws in it. Stubborn old coot!
  13. 33-weeker

    What do patients say that irks you?

    AMEN! If it wouldn't get me dinged on customer service, I'd remind them that this is their baby and THEY are responsible for providing for it. Unfortunately our government has provided for far too long and for far too many, and now they've come to expect it. :angryfire
  14. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    These dash (-) names crack me up. If they told me, "The dash isn't silent.", I'd be tempted to say, " Honey, dashes are ALWAYS silent." :smackingf :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
  15. 33-weeker

    What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby?

    I'd bet money they meant 'Nevaeh' and simply misspelled it. We've got another 'Genesis' right now. Ick! I just don't get it.
  16. 33-weeker

    Rules for the ER (long)

    are you talking about patients or staff. :chuckle