strange request? - page 3

If you can share what is the strangest (funniest, most unique) request a pt or family memeber has ever aks?... Read More

  1. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I had a patient (who had no bowel troubles) ask me to give her an enema, even though in 10 years of OB nursing, we have not done this anyplace I worked. When I told her of the possibility of runny poops at inopportune moments, and electrolyte imbalances, she did not care. She wanted a "completely clean" birth, whatever that means. She wound up asking the MD for one and he gave me an order to do it. So I did.

    the only time I ever gave an elective enema in 10 years in OB practice.

    And yes, runny poop happens after these, even when you think it's "done". Yuck. It was far from a "clean birth" experience for her.

    Enemas were part and parcel of labor in the old days. When I had my oldest son almost 24 years ago now, I had an enema (per the nurse's insistence), she shaved my entire peri-area, I got an episiotomy as a matter of course. I also stayed 3 days for a vag deliver. (This was in Reno, NV).

    22 months later, in this small town I had a completely different experience. No enema, no shaving (thank God - that was torture growing back), no episiotomy and I was out of the hospital in 24 hours.

    I occasionally get a woman who is so embarrassed about the fact that she might just poop during labor that she asks for an enema. And these are not old ladies like me - young girls. They are also appalled at the "mess" of labor. They hate cervical checks due to the mucous on my glove. Some people are just more "fastidious" than others.

    steph
  2. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Arwen_U
    A lot of people in a lot of places eat placenta. It's not that unusual in other countries.
    We've had quite a few threads regarding placenta issues . . . . .one was about keeping the placenta attached to the baby and having lovely velvet carriers for it until it dries up and falls off. One woman says her dd remembers being prematurely separated from the placenta at birth and hated it. . . . . steph:spin:

    (maybe I should go search for that old thread).
  3. by   HR_LPN
    PRMENRS: Aaaahahahaha! That's the funniest thing I've ever heard that called!!!:roll To funny!
  4. by   Spidey's mom
    Here it is . . . . . there are others but this had the most responses.

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f35/lotu...ht=Lotus+birth


    steph
  5. by   dumitra
    In my country everybody gets an enema, shaved before giving birth. And we stay in the hospital for seven days after normal vag. delivery.(Paid maternity leave for a year). I had my second child here in US. Gave myself a nice enema before going to the hospital. I liked my OB Dr. too much to s.... on her.

    Dumitra
  6. by   LizzyL&DRN
    I work w/ several docs at my hospital.. And yes one does require his patients to still have enemas. Funny thing though....Almost every one of his patients "refuse" the enema. When I tell them he wants them to have it they always get a horrified look on their faces. I also manage to slip in the conversation they have the right to refuse it if they want. We don't call our docs til baby is crowning anyway, so by that time if anything does come out its all out and cleaned up before he walks in.
  7. by   ElvishDNP
    Quote from stevielynn
    We've had quite a few threads regarding placenta issues . . . . .one was about keeping the placenta attached to the baby and having lovely velvet carriers for it until it dries up and falls off. One woman says her dd remembers being prematurely separated from the placenta at birth and hated it. . . . . steph:spin:

    (maybe I should go search for that old thread).
    I wouldn't do the lotus birth thing but if if makes someone else happy, go for it. I personally probably wouldn't eat placenta but if someone else does, more power to them.

    I am going to check out that thread!
  8. by   KellNY
    She also requested that the toddler sibling be on the bed with her during birth AND cut the cord. Talk about ptsd.
    What is that supposed to mean?

    Are you implying that it's traumatic for toddlers to witness the birth of their sibling? Because I've been to many births where the (soon to be) older sibling was present, and only once saw a negative reaction from the child. And that was because those particular parents were pretty demanding of the child.

    Usually they're very interested, or just don't seem to care/notice. This is common practice in many parts of the world where birth isn't so regulated and institutionalzed--where they have better birth outcomes as well *hint hint*.

    NEVER any ptsd or anything excessive like that, and quite frankly, that was a very uneducated thing to imply.
  9. by   2curlygirls
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    I saw this done on TV. The woman made a pate and served it to guests at a party after the birth. She served it on crackers or bread or something.
    Ok, yargh. Fine if YOU want to eat it, but don't impose it on others!
    Reminds me of the breastmilk ice cream my friend was served...

    My sister kept both her kids' placentas (flew one across country) and planted them. We had a wee little ceremony.

    We had one mom that was a homebirth transfer for meconium and fetal distress. She was so set on delivering on the toilet that she and her doula locked themselves in the loo until after baby was born (and security had removed the door from it's hinges) Apgars of 0,2,5.
  10. by   lovemyjob
    Quote from KellNY
    What is that supposed to mean?

    Are you implying that it's traumatic for toddlers to witness the birth of their sibling? Because I've been to many births where the (soon to be) older sibling was present, and only once saw a negative reaction from the child. And that was because those particular parents were pretty demanding of the child.

    Usually they're very interested, or just don't seem to care/notice. This is common practice in many parts of the world where birth isn't so regulated and institutionalzed--where they have better birth outcomes as well *hint hint*.

    NEVER any ptsd or anything excessive like that, and quite frankly, that was a very uneducated thing to imply.

    I think it could be a bit traumatic for a 2 year old to see mommy moaning in pain and making other noises to cope with the labor. Also, seeing all of the blood and other stuff. I think it could be pretty hard on a youg child, heck, even an older child. I dont think it is an uneducated statement at all. And that is regardless of the regulations/institutions.

    Not only that, PTSD is not something you would see in the delivery room, or a few hours later. Children can have overexagerated imaginations and may remember it very different than it actually happens. Ever have a kid recall something big (good or bad) that happened to them? Usually, you get an exaggerated story, because that is how they remember it.
  11. by   KellNY
    Quote from lovemyjob
    I think it could be a bit traumatic for a 2 year old to see mommy moaning in pain and making other noises to cope with the labor. Also, seeing all of the blood and other stuff. I think it could be pretty hard on a youg child, heck, even an older child. I dont think it is an uneducated statement at all. And that is regardless of the regulations/institutions.

    Not only that, PTSD is not something you would see in the delivery room, or a few hours later. Children can have overexagerated imaginations and may remember it very different than it actually happens. Ever have a kid recall something big (good or bad) that happened to them? Usually, you get an exaggerated story, because that is how they remember it.
    I'm sorry that you think that, but it's worked quite well for years. Like I said it happens all the time in other countries, and more often than you'd think here. And I've never heard of ONE case of ptsd from a sibling witnessing a normal (or abnormal) birth. Many children get scared if the adults around them are acting scared/frantic/panic-y. Witnessing a normal delivery of a sibling is actually a great lesson on birth (that blood loss is normal, that mama moaning doesn't mean she's hurt or sick, that people are here to help her, etc--sure beats the glossed over, dramatic Hollywood depiction IMO), and depending on the age of the sibleng, can help create an amazing bond.

    I understand PTSD, and I've kept in contact with many of my clients who delivered, and we're talking about 5+ years ago, and they're showing no signs of PTSD whatsoever. Some siblings were thrilled at the idea of watching another sibling being born (ie they were there for their sister's birth, now mom is pregnant again). Some, like I said, didn't care-they sat there coloring while baby was crowning, or munching on juice and cookies.

    When I said uneducated I meant it not as an insult, but as an observation. It's also wrong to assume that this mother was potentially causing a debilitating mental illness to her young child by requesting that he attend the birth (and yes, as I'm sure you know, PTSD is debilitating). ALL the mothers I've known who had their younger or older children at their birth took a formal class to prepare the child, or did a lot of self education-including watching graphic videos of normal vaginal births.

    It depends on the child, and NO child should ever be forced to do anything. But in general, birth is not traumatic unless you make it so--especially a child who has not been indoctrinated into our "Birth is a medical emergency and oh-so dangerous culture". Blood and poo and goo and slime and moans are not a nighmare unless we make them that. Sometimes they're normal and healthy, as in a birth, and I think it's a great lesson for a willing child.
  12. by   lovemyjob
    either way, all I am saying is that it is not unreasonable that someone would be concerned about he effects of the birth on a young child. I think a case where a delivery went south (yes deliveries that have no intervention can go south just like one with an epidural, an IV and pit) can/could be traumatic.
  13. by   love2shop
    On a lighter note to this whole sibling thing I would never
    have my child in with me. She loves to tell "personal family"
    things to everyone she meets. Like "daddy is constipated...do you
    know what constipated means?" To the poor unsuspecting mailman.
    Could you imagine the stories she would have if witnessed a birth?
    Ugh!!!

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