Spanish speaking patients in labor - pg.2 | allnurses

Spanish speaking patients in labor - page 2

I need some advice on a problem that is new to my area. I live in a small Kentucky town and a local food processing plant has recently began a new program of recruiting workers from Mexico. In the... Read More

  1. Visit  JentheOBRN profile page
    0
    Quote from OB4ME
    At the last hospital I worked at, we have access to a "CyraCom" phone-which is a phone used specifically for translation. Anyways, it has 2 receivers. You plug it in to the phone jack in the patient's room, pick one receiver up, access the service (MANY different languages are available), and you are connected to a translater. They give you an ID number which you then write in your notes ("Admission H+P completed, as translated by cyracom rep#..."). Then, you give the second receiver to the patient. And you actually have an official translation session going! I like it, other than the extra time taken-figure it will take twice as long as it would for you to do for your english-speaking patients. Usually, when I admit a pt, I will cover EVERYTHING that I can think of in one translation-from admission paperwork to consents to plan of care (including possible use of pitocin, ivs, etc.) and pain management.
    The service really is handy. Maybe you can suggest it to your manager??? The do have a website: http://www.cyracom.net. I'm sure there are probably other companies out there as well.
    This is what our hospital uses. That and a PT interpreter that floats to all floors. I work nights so I try to request the interp. right away and get all my teaching etc. done at the start. Then I use the phones for the rest of the shift. We are not allowed to use any non-approved interp. because especially family members (like children) could be embarrased by some of the things we need to ask.... STD's, GBS, Drug use etc.
  2. Visit  JentheOBRN profile page
    0
    Quote from qtbabynurse
    my mexican mamas continue to be my absolute favorite patients of all! you will not find a more grateful, appreciative group of women. they are good mamas and do their best for the babies....very loving.....way different than your "princesses
    same for me in central ca. i love my mexican mama's! i wish i knew more spanish.....
  3. Visit  morte profile page
    1
    Quote from tntrn
    Here's another thought. Maybe the employer who is recruiting all these folks can provide a certified interpretor as well as English classes which the workers are required to take.
    over the years that you and i have been here, i cant think of too much we have agreed on....but this is def one!
    and i will go you one better....since this is a scheduled move, i think the english language lessons should be commenced at home in mexico, and a basic level be met before immigrating....i have a hearing deficit....and try very hard not to make that anyone else's problem and i see the language issue in the same light.....maybe if the company were required to do this, hiring these workers wouldnt be so appealing. In the current economy they cant find any one here to do these jobs? highly unlikely....so they get the tax payer to pay for all sorts of things for them.......geesh
    tntrn likes this.
  4. Visit  tntrn profile page
    0
    Quote from morte
    over the years that you and i have been here, i cant think of too much we have agreed on....but this is def one!"

    Not even one little teeny tiny thing? That's really too bad.


    and i will go you one better....since this is a scheduled move, i think the english language lessons should be commenced at home in mexico, and a basic level be met before immigrating....i have a hearing deficit....and try very hard not to make that anyone else's problem and i see the language issue in the same light.....maybe if the company were required to do this, hiring these workers wouldnt be so appealing. In the current economy they cant find any one here to do these jobs? highly unlikely....so they get the tax payer to pay for all sorts of things for them.......geesh
    We do indeed agree on this one. And it would extend to any immigrant who wants to come here: learn some English before you come at the very least, or get into some classes the second you get here. Show some initiative. Some of us taxpayers are tired of paying for it all.
  5. Visit  futuremombabynurse profile page
    0
    Coming from South Texas, I'm in the minority of people who don't speak Spanish with some level of fluency, and I can offer a suggestion...

    While yes, the hospital should definately look into getting interpretors, there are two things that can be invaluable. First, even though a lot of the mothers may not speak English...if they have older children, nieces, nephews, etc, the children may. During Holy Week, a lot of families who come here to shop use their children as interpretors and almost every family I've encountered has at least one child fluent in English and Spanish. Not 100% guaranteed, but something that can help in a pinch.

    Also, get a book of Medical Spanish. There is a good one by Lipincott in the Made Incredibly Easy series, as well as a pocket version. There are specialty-related phrases and common answers laid out, and it pays to have a couple of basics under your belt. (Con qu frequencia vienen las contracciones? Cunto duran los Dolores? Un minuto / dos / cinco...Tiene historia de un problema medico?Tiene alergias a las medicinas?Respire lentamente por la boca...etc.)

    http://www.123teachme.com/learn_span...ery_gynecology
    Has some good phrases to start out with.

    One more suggestion...learn about the culture as well. An inservice on cultural aspects of Mexican families during pregnancy and birth can cut down a lot of frustrations with things like entire extended families piling into delivery rooms, etc. (Someone could also present some useful Spanish phrases )
  6. Visit  QTBabyNurse profile page
    0
    Quote from futuremombabynurse
    one more suggestion...learn about the culture as well. an inservice on cultural aspects of mexican families during pregnancy and birth can cut down a lot of frustrations with things like entire extended families piling into delivery rooms, etc. (someone could also present some useful spanish phrases )
    [font="century gothic"]the post above brings up a good point regarding the culture. many mexican mothers need education regarding early breastfeeding. although they eventually do breastfeed their babies, they are reluctant to nurse them for the first few days until their milk comes in because previous generations have taught them that the colostrum is bad for the baby. the mexican culture looks to the older women in the family to teach them how to care for their infants. consequently, some of that information is outdated and/or dangerous...such as sleeping with the baby next to you in bed and also placing the infant on his/her tummy for sleep. there is alot of teaching that needs to take place!
  7. Visit  SmilingBluEyes profile page
    1
    Ask your management and admin about getting language line access YESTERDAY. You are required by law, to provide translation services to such people, and this will be your answer 24/7. Remember, family members and friends are not always suitable translators and you will be held liable for misunderstandings in such critical issues like consent to treatment, etc.

    We have a language line for that purpose, and access to many languages for translation 24/7 and it works!

    Do this soon!!!

    Good luck. I am glad I learned Spanish; it's not a hard language to learn and I use it often.
    Elvish likes this.
  8. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    i think my first post is still the best solution.....
  9. Visit  SmilingBluEyes profile page
    4
    OF course, a solution for us would be to have all people learn English. However, there are barriers that exist that prevent this. ESL classes are great but waiting lists are long in many areas. English is a difficult language to learn for anyone; just look at us. We take English comp/literature classes all the way through high school, and into college, and we are native speakers. As tough as you might think it is to learn Spanish for us, English is even harder. And not all Latino folks lack initiative. Most of the ones I speak to are in one way or another trying to learn, but like I said, barriers exist, be they transportation, culture, waiting lists or family issues. Often, they pretend not to understand or speak English when they have some level of competency and fluency, for fear of looking "stupid" or uneducated. Don't assume no efforts are being made, however; that is unfair.

    And yes, learning culture is a very important idea. Not even all Mexicans share the exact same culture. It's a big country, and mores and beliefs do vary by region and family. Also, Spanish is a second language for many of them, their first being an Indian dialect of some sort. So we are asking them to learn, now, a third tongue. This does not happen overnight and so few of us in the USA even speak a second, how about a third?

    We can argue all day long about what "should be". But the reality is, we have people from all over the globe coming here who do not share our culture, mores and language. And it's also a fact we are required to provide translation services for non-English speakers. The best way I know is to have 24/7 reliable services you can count on. The liability we share as care providers demands it, whether we agree with this or not.

    Ask about the language translation service line. It's a lifesaver. And yes, learn a bit about the culture of the people who will be coming into your care; it does help everyone, not just our patients.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on May 8, '09
    sopRaNo, QTBabyNurse, mamafeliz, and 1 other like this.
  10. Visit  SmilingBluEyes profile page
    0
    A bit off topic, just want to share one of the most beautiful phrases I was ever taught in Spanish language:

    Dando (or dar) la luz (for giving birth)....

    Literally translated, this means, "giving light". Says a lot to me.
  11. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    OF course, a solution for us would be to have all people learn English. However, there are barriers that exist that prevent this. ESL classes are great but waiting lists are long in many areas. English is a difficult language to learn for anyone; just look at us. We take English comp/literature classes all the way through high school, and into college, and we are native speakers. As tough as you might think it is to learn Spanish for us, English is even harder. And not all Latino folks lack initiative. Most of the ones I speak to are in one way or another trying to learn, but like I said, barriers exist, be they transportation, culture, waiting lists or family issues. Often, they pretend not to understand or speak English when they have some level of competency and fluency, for fear of looking "stupid" or uneducated. Don't assume no efforts are being made, however; that is unfair.

    And yes, learning culture is a very important idea. Not even all Mexicans share the exact same culture. It's a big country, and mores and beliefs do vary by region and family. Also, Spanish is a second language for many of them, their first being an Indian dialect of some sort. So we are asking them to learn, now, a third tongue. This does not happen overnight and so few of us in the USA even speak a second, how about a third?

    We can argue all day long about what "should be". But the reality is, we have people from all over the globe coming here who do not share our culture, mores and language. And it's also a fact we are required to provide translation services for non-English speakers. The best way I know is to have 24/7 reliable services you can count on. The liability we share as care providers demands it, whether we agree with this or not.

    Ask about the language translation service line. It's a lifesaver. And yes, learn a bit about the culture of the people who will be coming into your care; it does help everyone, not just our patients.
    my comment only applied to this particular circumstance.....they are, it appears, being recruited en masse, ahead of time.......why not make rudimentary English a deciding factor? partly because the company then will lose some degree of control, i would think....and, again, only in this particular circumstance, are not USAers being hired?
  12. Visit  SmilingBluEyes profile page
    3
    The point of the thread, however, is not whether we agree with importing workers who speak little to no English to the USA. It is a done deal in this case. Now, the object is how to best care for the people who are going to be joining that community. It's not up the medical community to decide hiring practices of local companies. For the record, I agree with and see your point. But wanting and getting it done are two different things.

    Please, Let's not derail this into a political debate. This thread was a request for a solution to an existing situation. There are a lot of threads already dedicated such debates.

    Have a good day!
  13. Visit  mamafeliz profile page
    1
    I have worked with the Spanish Speaking migrant population throughout my adult career. You may certainly carry your ideas regarding immigrants' need to learn language, culture. Within your job capacity, those are opinions best kept to yourself, and should in no way impact the quality of care you provide your patients. The bottom line is that we must approach our patients with every intent to meet their needs. If we are not fluent in their language, we must access interpreters who can ensure informed consent and guide our nursing actions. If we have a large ethnic community served within our hospital, management should provide education to better meet that groups' needs in so vulnerable a window as birth. Most cultures have specific beliefs and needs surrounding a transition as profound as birth, and the onus in on us to learn about and support those needs.

    I am fluent in Spanish, and love working with this loving, gracious community. Although I do not speak any African languages, I care tenderly for women who do utilizing interpreters as needed. Special considerations have arisen with our growing Somali population regarding supporting women in birth with female circumcision. Nurse education has been considered to specifically address nursing actions to support this particular group of women.

    It sounds like your institution is in great need of some cultural sensitivity training. Open your heart to diversity and your life will grow richer.
    QTBabyNurse likes this.


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