Any suggestions on a good resignation letter - page 2

I just resigned from my L and D job today. It was a forced resignation. Pretty much either quit or we we'll fire you. I was on orientation and my preceptor and I just didn't click. She would tell... Read More

  1. by   H ynnoD
    Thats what my Boss told me,they can be liable for slander,so they no longer tell why a person does'nt work there any more.Just the dates they worked there.(The damage of a bad reference is they can keep you from getting a job,so it is'nt that hard to sue over it,but it does cost money)
    Last edit by H ynnoD on Jul 18, '03
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am so sorry for your bad job experience. A poor preceptor CAN totally ruin it. I hope you have NOT given up your dream to be a L and D nurse; don't let this one bring you down. Take some time to regroup and dust yourself off and GET BACK ON THE HORSE again! I really do wish you the best, hon.
  3. by   Caveman
    Thats what my Boss told me,they can be liable for slander,so they no longer tell why a person does'nt work there any more.Just the dates they worked there.(The damage of a bad reference is they can keep you from getting a job,so it is'nt that hard to sue over it,but it does cost money)

    __________________________________________________ __

    The problem with suing for any kind of defamation is that the burden of proof is on the plaintiff. Former employer says that Donny H was often late for work. Donny H claims that he was always on time and sues for slander. Donny H has to prove that he was rarely late for work, not the other way around. As far as damages go, it is true that a bad reference can cost you a job, which can have an extremely negative effect on your life. The problem is translating this into a dollar amount. How much is one nursing job worth, especially since there is a shortage of nurses and a gazillion other jobs you could take? (At least, that is the perception most people have.) Unless you can convience an attorney that there will be an award (or more likely, a settlement) that will cover his/her fee and all the expenses, he/she won't be interested in your case. And if there IS enough money to cover fees and expenses, will there be anything left over for YOU? Yes...this is your life we are talking about, but to the lawyer it's just a business. He/she is not going to take the case if it's going to cost him/her money. On the other hand, it costs just as much to defend against a lawsuit as it does to bring one, and most employers don't want the expense. So, it is in everone's interest to avoid bad references and all the grief that can follow.
    Last edit by Caveman on Jul 18, '03
  4. by   colleen10
    I agree with Wendy's resignation letter sample.

    I have a question though. Since you are resigning, does that mean that you will be eligible for re-hire at a later date? I guess if I were in your shoes I would be concerned that I could never work at that facility or any of it's sister hospitals, clinics, etc.

    I'm sure right now you're feeling that you'll never want to work there ever again, but no one knows what the future holds and whose to say that years from now (just maybe) this facility will get it's act together and you may have a chance to get a really good position on another floor? Or, if it's a large facility will you be barred from getting a job at perhaps a clinic that is part of this hospitals system?

    I guess my major concern would be that I understand the exact conditions and status that I would be leaving under.
  5. by   CseMgr1
    Originally posted by Wendy M.
    Well my resignation with the hospital was just a few sentences...
    This is to inform you of my resignation which will become effective (insert date 2 weeks from when you are giving the resignation).

    Sincerely,
    1 Po'd, R. N. <EG>


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