Nursing in the UK - page 6

I am a registered nurse in the US, and I'd like to get some information on how nursing works in the UK...for example: 1. Are nurses called "Registered Nurses" or "Licensed Nurses" or are they... Read More

  1. by   Gretta2
    Hi! I'm thinking about working in the UK. Does it matter much if you have a degree versus a diploma. In Canada it doesn't make much difference in your wage.
    as far as agencies go, are they accommodating to families (i have a child and husband)?
    Any tips? I need a break from these long cold winters!
  2. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from Gretta2
    Hi! I'm thinking about working in the UK. Does it matter much if you have a degree versus a diploma. In Canada it doesn't make much difference in your wage.
    as far as agencies go, are they accommodating to families (i have a child and husband)?
    Any tips? I need a break from these long cold winters!
    hi
    I don't think it matters re degree v diploma in nursing over here in the UK as long as you fit the NMC's overseas nursing requirements, if you go to this link and look under international nurse you should be able to get the relevent info. www.nmc-uk.org
    regarding agencies and accommadation I haven't got a clue but if they have a web site it is something you can ask them, If possible I would not work in London as it is too expensive to live.

    Don't you know we are not reknowned for having good weather in the UK generally alot of rain.

    hope this is of some help.
    Anna
  3. by   jksam
    Hi, I'm a new Canadian nursing grad. I'm dying to go abroad and explore the rest of the world and work at the same time. I have my heart set on the UK. With everything that I've read in this thread regarding the differences between the UK healthcare system and the US (Canadian) healthcare system I'm wondering if I should stay in Canada and gain experience before going abroad. I feel that I have gained a good grasp on nursing in Canada through my four years of study, and I feel confident with my skills as a new grad.....but I still have a whole lot to learn in the nursing profession. I'm frequently told that I should gain a couple years of experience before going abroad, but I have ants in my pants and I want to go in the near future. Any thoughts or words of wisdom would be very helpful!
    thanks
  4. by   fergus51
    I have a friend who went to London as a new grad and came back a few years later. She is an excellent nurse, so it doesn't seem to have hurt her at all. If you want to go, I say enjoy!
  5. by   jksam
    thanks fergus51...that's very encouraging!
  6. by   Wendy Huang
    Quote from jksam
    Hi, I'm a new Canadian nursing grad. I'm dying to go abroad and explore the rest of the world and work at the same time. I have my heart set on the UK. With everything that I've read in this thread regarding the differences between the UK healthcare system and the US (Canadian) healthcare system I'm wondering if I should stay in Canada and gain experience before going abroad. I feel that I have gained a good grasp on nursing in Canada through my four years of study, and I feel confident with my skills as a new grad.....but I still have a whole lot to learn in the nursing profession. I'm frequently told that I should gain a couple years of experience before going abroad, but I have ants in my pants and I want to go in the near future. Any thoughts or words of wisdom would be very helpful!
    thanks
    Hi, I almost read the new treads in this room everyday since i found this website.I am registered nurse work in China for three years. I also have this kind of ideas to work UK, I am just curious about the world, i want to explore the world as well. I have read many treads and get to know lots of UK nurses want to move to US, I don't know why they want to move, because of the pay or the nurse position in the hospital? I think if you can apply for a job in UK, do it when you are young. I think you need registered to NMC before you work. I have to pass the english language test and need training in UK for 6 months before working. Hope this helps. I'd like to share with you my mind. You can e-mail me.

    Wendy from China
  7. by   Atheana
    Quote from Karen30
    Being a nurse is not only about being able to carry out technical aspects, such as B.P. monitoring, for example, but being able to care for people who are unwell and not able in some way to care for themselves. Being a nurse is about showing compassion, understanding, strength and stamina, as well as reassuring and alleviating fears. Many patients I have cared for really couldn't care what their B.P. is, sometimes all they want is for someone to be there to hold there hand, to listen and to explain things.
    I couldn't agree with you more Karen. Well said.
  8. by   VA_CCRC
    I am presently working as an RN in the US. In the future I may be interested in relocating to the UK. I possess an Associate's Degree in Nursing. Would I need to return to school to work in the UK or is there some sort of reciprocity? Any info would be helpful...Thanks
  9. by   donmurray
    www.nmc-uk.org

    This is a link to the UK nurses' registraton body website Click on the overseas applicant section.
    Last edit by donmurray on Jul 14, '04
  10. by   gwenhyfar
    Quote from BrigitteRN
    I am presently working as an RN in the US. In the future I may be interested in relocating to the UK. I possess an Associate's Degree in Nursing. Would I need to return to school to work in the UK or is there some sort of reciprocity? Any info would be helpful...Thanks

    I recently was approved to work in the UK as an RN1 - don't know what the 1 means, but if you want to work there as an ADN nurse, it is possible, but get started early, and have all your documentation ready - course descriptions, contact the NMC and get your papers going, and be ready to pay. The exchange rate varies, and a credit card is necessary.
    It is a long, drawn-out process, and I understand why - they want qualified nurses as much as the US does.
    If you are interested in more, let me know.
    Gwenhyfar
  11. by   Karen30
    HI

    I am assuming that the 1 indicates that you are a first level registered nurse.
  12. by   lagaillarde
    hello
    i am an american with duel nationality (french also). i spent most of my life living in the usa. i worked five years as a nurse aide; then went to college, recieved my associate degree in nursing and worked three years in the usa. last december after the emergency birth of my son i moved here to france with my husband in hopes of working here as a nurse after about a year or so. i figured i would take a year off to be with my son, learn the language in the process and then see about working here. the problem though is my language skills have improved but i still do not read or write french. i also checked into working as a nurse here and the american diploma is not the same as the french. i will have to take an exam and depending on the score of the exam go to school here for one to three years. another option is that my american diploma is the same as the english diploma all i have to do is register with the NMC; that is it. After I will be able to work anywhere in europe because england is part of the european community so the english diploma works in europe; then i will just need to speak the language which is a job with in itself!!!
    if anyone has any information that might be of help as far as work in england, the best areas, pay in england , nmc how long it takes etc. it will be of great help. also anyone working in france or planning too let me know if you have any information.
    thanks
    michelle lagaillarde
  13. by   gwenhyfar
    Just go to the NMC website, and you can get started. If you want specifics, it is hard to give them. It took me about 4 months to hear after I submitted my credentials. It took a while to get the packet - about 4 weeks after I asked for the initial packet.
    There are lots of websites, but unless you are very familiar with the EU terminology, it is hard to figure out.
    Good luck, email if I can be of more help.

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