Comparison of US and UK pay - page 9

I am a RN working in the US. I am just beginning to look into the comparison of pay and cost of living. If I moved to the UK, can I expect to make more or less? Can anyone give me any information... Read More

  1. by   suehp
    Quote from misswoosie
    Hi everyone


    Anyone know anyone who got H1B visa? My attorney has suggested this as an option for me.

    Thanks
    Thy dont do H1B visa's for nurses anymore (not unless things have changed in the last few months whn I wasnt paying attention!)
  2. by   adrianwd5
    Hi

    I recently moved here to California from the UK to work as a RN. Back in the UK I was the ward manager and earned 32,000pa, here I make $30 per hour, this works out at slightly less per hour but the cost of living here is lower than in the UK, yes even in the Bay Area!

    I work for an agency and feel that they shafted us financially, the Nurses on a California Nurses Association Contract make twice what I do!! so working here is going to be good.

    Standards of care here are different, bettere in some ways, worse in others

    what else can I tell you?

    Adrian
  3. by   madwife2002
    Quote from adrianwd5
    Hi

    I recently moved here to California from the UK to work as a RN. Back in the UK I was the ward manager and earned 32,000pa, here I make $30 per hour, this works out at slightly less per hour but the cost of living here is lower than in the UK, yes even in the Bay Area!

    I work for an agency and feel that they shafted us financially, the Nurses on a California Nurses Association Contract make twice what I do!! so working here is going to be good.

    Standards of care here are different, bettere in some ways, worse in others

    what else can I tell you?

    Adrian
    Ditto I couldnt agree more
  4. by   RGN1
    Quote from SueIP
    Thy dont do H1B visa's for nurses anymore (not unless things have changed in the last few months whn I wasnt paying attention!)
    H1B is not an option for nursing because nurses do not necessarily need a higher degree to practice & the H1B is only for those jobs in which you have to have a higher degree in order to practice. A nurse technically only needs to have a diploma in order to practice & ,therefore, is not in an H1B qualifying job. Suggest you change your attorney Misswoosie because they don't seem to know this & they should!

    I hope that made sense! I'm not an expert, just been doing this immigration lark for a while now!
  5. by   misswoosie
    Hi
    If the post you are applying for demands a BSN and you have one then you will fullfill the criteria for H1B. The job I have been offered does specify BSN as it is a specialised post and I do have one. The problem lies in the fact that the 65,000 H1B cap for the fiscal year was reached on the first day. There are 20,000 H1Bs available above the cap for posts that meet the criteria AND that are in not for profit organisations affiliated to organisations of higher education. So it is possible for a nurse to get H1B but only if all the criteria are met(and of course if the visas haven't run out).
  6. by   misswoosie
    Here are links to files in USCIS
    http://www.uscis.gov/files/article/EIB19.pdf
    http: //www.uscis.gov/files/pressrelease/NurseMemo_112702.pdf
  7. by   rockunderdew
    Sounds like the grass isn't necessarily greener on the other side... Hello, all. Very new here (less than an hour since I registered). As my personal life has a high likelihood of washing up onto the shores east of the Atlantic in the very near future, I wanted to get an idea of an RN's salary in the UK. I knew I'd be taking a huge paycut (that's if I even manage to get a job) but had no idea just how bad the damage would be. It looks like I'm going to have to brace myself & be friends with my calculator/Excel once again. Maybe I can be an RN/Day trader? It's daunting to think I'm going to have to rethink my nursing career. It's all i know how to do.... It's high anxiety for me here in SF until then.
  8. by   Silverdragon102
    Quote from rockunderdew
    Sounds like the grass isn't necessarily greener on the other side... Hello, all. Very new here (less than an hour since I registered). As my personal life has a high likelihood of washing up onto the shores east of the Atlantic in the very near future, I wanted to get an idea of an RN's salary in the UK. I knew I'd be taking a huge paycut (that's if I even manage to get a job) but had no idea just how bad the damage would be. It looks like I'm going to have to brace myself & be friends with my calculator/Excel once again. Maybe I can be an RN/Day trader? It's daunting to think I'm going to have to rethink my nursing career. It's all i know how to do.... It's high anxiety for me here in SF until then.


    You will have to go through the NMC and meet UK requirments and a lot depends on how long your training was before you can work as a RN here in the UK. I take it you will have either a work permit or some other means on coming to the UK Although this link is for 2006 it will give you a rough idea on pay in the UK and you need to look for ** in band 5 as that is roughly starting point for RN http://www.rcn.org.uk/agendaforchang...ay/pay2006.php

    Also to add job situation for nurses in the UK in a lot of areas are not good although some areas do have work. Lots of student nurses just qualifying are struggling to find work
    Last edit by Silverdragon102 on Jun 9, '07 : Reason: add
  9. by   rockunderdew
    Anna, thank you for the link. I know I have to go through a battery of screenings before I can even register with the NMC, although I expected that and am actually for the whole 'weeding out' process. As far as experience, I've been a nurse for 13 years (wow, i didn't realize it has been that long) with the last 8 years spent in Critical Care. I know how difficult the situation is for most nurses in England which is why I'm not exactly enthusiastic to make the move and am even actively considering a career change altogether. Compared to UK nurses & nurses all the world over, many of us California nurses really have it so easy.The prospect of leaving my cushy job for an uncertain & foreign life is nerve-wracking. (Un)fortunately, it's my personal life that seems to be dictating the current trajectory of my life as a whole (and that's a whole other website & forum).
    Anna, thank you again, and I look forward to more feedback from you & other nurses/sisters out there. Should I take the big leap, you may be the only friends I'd have for a while. Nurses are still the best people.
  10. by   madwife2002
    Quote from rockunderdew
    Anna, thank you for the link. I know I have to go through a battery of screenings before I can even register with the NMC, although I expected that and am actually for the whole 'weeding out' process. As far as experience, I've been a nurse for 13 years (wow, i didn't realize it has been that long) with the last 8 years spent in Critical Care. I know how difficult the situation is for most nurses in England which is why I'm not exactly enthusiastic to make the move and am even actively considering a career change altogether. Compared to UK nurses & nurses all the world over, many of us California nurses really have it so easy.The prospect of leaving my cushy job for an uncertain & foreign life is nerve-wracking. (Un)fortunately, it's my personal life that seems to be dictating the current trajectory of my life as a whole (and that's a whole other website & forum).
    Anna, thank you again, and I look forward to more feedback from you & other nurses/sisters out there. Should I take the big leap, you may be the only friends I'd have for a while. Nurses are still the best people.
    You know you will be fine. I remember how nervous I was when I came to the US( I wanted to do it all my life, but when it came down to it I could have a million excuses not to come) and I am not going to kid you it was hard actually much harder than I thought it would be. But once everything settles and life becomes normal again then you realise this changing countires thing is good for you. You have the great experience of being able to compare and contrast, which often enables you to make better descions. You bring a wealth of information and knowledge to a new country and people love hearing about how things are, how you did things b4 and what you would do in the future.
    Once you feel you are excepted in an country it is a great feeling, notice I said 'you feel' I think that is the key. Being comfortable again
  11. by   Belinda-wales
    Something which is really different in the USA than the UK is that you get payed for over time- which is something that hardly ever happen to me when I worked in the uk- we used to have a time owing book so all your extra hours went in the book and then when we were over staffed and quiet - Like that ever happened!
  12. by   XB9S
    Quote from Belinda-wales
    Something which is really different in the USA than the UK is that you get payed for over time- which is something that hardly ever happen to me when I worked in the uk- we used to have a time owing book so all your extra hours went in the book and then when we were over staffed and quiet - Like that ever happened!
    overtime whats that, we do the extra hours because we love being in work so much
    :spin:
    I did get overtime once, about 7 years ago, can't remember why they authorised it but I remember being so surprised I almost missed out because I wasn't quick enough to say yes.
  13. by   Belinda-wales
    I Know you can imagine how shocked I was !

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