Retirement in the nursing field. - page 7

There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging... Read More

  1. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    0
    Hey-- try starting your own business at 50+. At least that's worked out so far. But retirement? In my dreaaaaammmmmsss.
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  3. Visit  CaptScrubs13 profile page
    2
    I Am a new nurse with only 4 mos experience on the job. There are nurses who were working for 15-20 years when I was BORN who are still working now.Their experience is crazy - they've seen so much and yes are able to do wound treatments etc a lot faster than me. Age does not correlate with good nursing practice.

    There are also nurses with 10+ years experience who don't care, don't follow protocols etc. Just because they have ten years on me doesn't mean they give better care than i do. It goes both ways !
    A.B.123 and roser13 like this.
  4. Visit  rnarthur profile page
    3
    This has been a great thread and I have enjoyed the opinions expressed here. My experience has been one of great cooperation between the differing age groups. Turn over at our facility is very limited. It is possible to be working along side of a new nurse who was once one of your peds patients or a nurse who was present at your own birth. We try to care for each other as family members. When my friend began having some trouble with her hearing I would do the breath sound assessments and she taught me excellent veinipuncture techniques that I have used for years. When my friend retired but had to return to be able to afford her medications, we all knew that someday we would be walking in her shoes and supported her as she had supported us when we took our first painfully slow steps into nursing. It would be wonderful if all nurses could retire while young enough to enjoy some quality of life, but by virtue of our giving nature, we often have nothing for ourselves when the time comes. I have been working at the same hospital for 32 years and plan to continue working at least until age 75. At that age, I may not be as quick as I am now but hopefully I will still be able to have value as a mentor and teacher and the younger nurses will realize that someday they too will be in the same position. I know that we don't always take care of ourselves but we can, and should take care of each other.
    A.B.123, Bubbles, and wooh like this.
  5. Visit  RNKPCE profile page
    3
    I'm almost 50 look barely 40 and am usually the first one to jump up and answer the endless bed alarms. Work ethic, fitness, wisdom and experience are more important than straight age in determining if an employee can still do the job.

    Where I work you rarely see staff over 40 texting during work or on the Internet. We worked for years without carrying a cell phone. My younger co-worker claim they have to carry their phone in case of an emergency. Heck some of them have 20 personal emergencies per shift at the rate they are on their phones. Give who ever the unit number and tell them to call only for true emergencies otherwise you'll call them on your break. ........ Stepping down from my soap box now
    A.B.123, GrnTea, and Fiona59 like this.
  6. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from Mulan
    An archival or historical document?, this page is dated 10/18/2012.
    it is what it said on the web page....I was quoting the web page......and besides.....I was born in 1960 so it's 67 for me.

    This is an archival or historical document. It may not reflect current policies or procedures.

    Your full retirement age is 65

    Remember, the earliest a person can start receiving Social Security retirement benefits will remain age 62.
    If you start receiving retirement benefits at age 62, you will get 80% of the monthly benefit because you will be getting benefits for an additional 36 months.
    If you start receiving benefits as a spouse at

    • your full retirement age, you will get 50% of the monthly benefit your spouse would receive if his or her benefits started at full retirement age.
    • age 62, you will get 37.5% of the monthly benefit instead of 50% because you will be getting benefits for an additional 36 months.

    Full Retirement Age: If You Were Born In 1937[/h]


    This is an archival or historical document. It may not reflect current policies or procedures.
    I have found that nothing is as it seems and what I have been told. Just a cautionary tale.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Feb 15, '13
  7. Visit  Mulan profile page
    2
    Quote from Esme12
    it is what it said on the web page....I was quoting the web page......and besides.....I was born in 1960 so it's 67 for me.

    I have found that nothing is as it seems and what I have been told. Just a cautionary tale.
    There are a lot of nurses posting here (who are still actually working by the way) who were born prior to 1960.
    Fiona59 and GrnTea like this.
  8. Visit  Altra profile page
    1
    Retirement Planner: Benefits By Year Of Birth

    This table on the social security website is easy to read and there is no ambiguity to figure out what your "full" retirement age is based on your year of birth, and what reductions you can expect if you elect to take social security retirement benefits prior to your full retirement age.
    A.B.123 likes this.
  9. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from Mulan
    There are a lot of nurses posting here (who are still actually working by the way) who were born prior to 1960.
    of course there are.....I was referring to my personal experience with other things that are never as they appear.
  10. Visit  Brit04 profile page
    2
    [QUOTE=A.B.123;7167092]There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision, hearing, unsteady gait, ect.) do you think they put their patients and themselves at risk for injury? If so do you think there should be a mandatory retirement age for nurses? I believe there should alternatives job requirement for nurses who are still working up until retirement age. There should be a test that is required for nurses up in their 60, 70s to take to make certain they are still capable of performing their nursing duties. If they don't pass they should have an alternative job, such as doing EMR electronic medical records input. This will eliminate patients and themselves at risk for injuries. I don't believe there shouldn't be a mandatory retirement age for nurses, but alternatives job or nurses who still are competent enough to work.
    A.B.123 and jrwest like this.
  11. Visit  roser13 profile page
    2
    [QUOTE=Brit04;7182779]
    Quote from A.B.123
    There is an issue going on at health care facilities about nurses who are still working as nurses well into their 60's and 70's. Assuming everyone ages differently, consider the effects of aging (such as decrease in vision, hearing, unsteady gait, ect.) do you think they put their patients and themselves at risk for injury? If so do you think there should be a mandatory retirement age for nurses? I believe there should alternatives job requirement for nurses who are still working up until retirement age. There should be a test that is required for nurses up in their 60, 70s to take to make certain they are still capable of performing their nursing duties. If they don't pass they should have an alternative job, such as doing EMR electronic medical records input. This will eliminate patients and themselves at risk for injuries. I don't believe there shouldn't be a mandatory retirement age for nurses, but alternatives job or nurses who still are competent enough to work.
    Agreed. While also requiring nurses of ALL ages to demonstrate competency. And not just CE's. COMPETENCY.

    Let's rid ourselves of incompetent nurses way before they reach traditional retirement age.
    GrnTea and Fiona59 like this.
  12. Visit  A.B.123 profile page
    0
    This was an assignment for one of my nursing classes. The topic was hypothetical. I wanted to choose a subject that was unique to all the other ones my classmates chose. Thank you for all your input and opinions. I got way more feedback than I thought I would, I really appreciate it.

    Hypothetically if the nurse (no matter what the age) is performing up to standards than there is no issue. I was aiming more for nurses who struggle with the AGING aspect effecting their job and their co workers. Maybe there will never be a mandatory retirement age for nurses, but what then, should happen? I have MUCH respect for any nurse, young or old- so this isn't about a war between older vs younger nurses. But where do we draw the line between putting patients and co workers at risk and allowing people to live out their lives and work for as long as they choose?
  13. Visit  A.B.123 profile page
    0
    Brit, I think that is an awesome idea. I know a lot of older nurses and many of them still practice nursing because they LOVE it so much. They live for it. Having an alternative job for them will still provide them with that needed security and love for nursing. Thanks so much for your input.
  14. Visit  Altra profile page
    3
    Quote from A.B.123
    This was an assignment for one of my nursing classes. The topic was hypothetical. I wanted to choose a subject that was unique to all the other ones my classmates chose. Thank you for all your input and opinions. I got way more feedback than I thought I would, I really appreciate it.
    I do not respect this as a technique of inquiry, nor am I convinced that you have gained much beyond individuals' opinions and biases.
    GrnTea, KelRN215, and roser13 like this.


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