LPN to BSN?

  1. Hello everyone. I have a question. I apologize if this has been discussed before but wasn't able to find the info i needed through a search so here goes. I'm starting LPN school in the fall and I should graduate by next summer and I'm really interested in finding an online program to become an RN. It just seems like that would be a lot more convenient than trying to schedule around work. Anyway, I've heard a lot about some online LPN to RN programs, as well as RN to BSN. What I haven't heard much about are LPN to BSN programs. Does anyone have any experience with LPN to BSN? Seems like that would be the way to go if I want to get by BSN rather than doing LPN to RN then RN to BSN. So here's my question: Is an LPN to BSN program pretty much the same as RN to BSN? If not, what are the differences? I just feel like I would be skipping some steps? Thanks in advance for any info
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   abracadabra2886
    Ok I think I just answered part of my own question. To enter the BSN you have to be an RN first. So is the LPN to BSN just the LPN to RN and the RN to BSN connected into one program? I knew that sounded too good to be true.
  4. by   EricJRN
    There are some LPN-to-BSN programs out there, but we're talking pretty small numbers. I believe that Indiana State University has one.

    Most of the time, LPN-to-RN programs would award an ADN (AAS, AS, ASN, etc).
  5. by   abracadabra2886
    Quote from EricEnfermero
    There are some LPN-to-BSN programs out there, but we're talking pretty small numbers. I believe that Indiana State University has one.

    Most of the time, LPN-to-RN programs would award an ADN (AAS, AS, ASN, etc).
    Thanks for the reply. So do you think these programs are actually legit? I mean don't you have to be and RN before you can get a BSN?
  6. by   EricJRN
    You don't have to. In fact, most BSN programs take students right out of high school.
  7. by   RN34TX
    Quote from EricEnfermero
    You don't have to. In fact, most BSN programs take students right out of high school.
    But the OP is talking about online programs for the LPN to BSN student.
    BSN programs who take people right out of high school are going to be your more traditional on campus programs.

    The problem here is that any LPN to BSN program is going to be considered a "prelicensure" program because the student is not already licensed as an RN.

    This means meeting state and other requirements for eligibility for RN licensure such as clinical experiences in L&D, psych, etc.

    RN to BSN programs are much different because the school does not have the responsibility of meeting state requirements for initial basic RN education.
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from abracadabra2886
    Thanks for the reply. So do you think these programs are actually legit? I mean don't you have to be and RN before you can get a BSN?

    Yes they are legit. Most LPN to BSN programs are at brick and mortor schools with clinicals, and they are few and far between. There is on in Miami but none around here. I think if there was more of demand there would be more.

    Apparently the college network does offer one through Indiana University and it's the only distance learning one I could see. It's probably similar to EC in it's approach. I would definately check out the accreditation, especially if you think their might be a masters in your future.

    Good luck.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from abracadabra2886
    Thanks for the reply. So do you think these programs are actually legit? I mean don't you have to be and RN before you can get a BSN?

    No there are two routes to the RN - the ADN and the BSN.
  10. by   EricJRN
    Quote from RN34TX
    But the OP is talking about online programs for the LPN to BSN student.
    BSN programs who take people right out of high school are going to be your more traditional on campus programs.
    Didn't mean to confuse anyone. Was trying to point out that there are multiple ways to earn a BSN, some of which don't involve earning an ADN first.
  11. by   Tweety
    Quote from EricEnfermero
    Didn't mean to confuse anyone. Was trying to point out that there are multiple ways to earn a BSN, some of which don't involve earning an ADN first.

    Right because the question was "don't you have to have your RN first to get a BSN". The answer of course is "no".
  12. by   Leo2
    Quote from abracadabra2886
    Hello everyone. I have a question. I apologize if this has been discussed before but wasn't able to find the info i needed through a search so here goes. I'm starting LPN school in the fall and I should graduate by next summer and I'm really interested in finding an online program to become an RN. It just seems like that would be a lot more convenient than trying to schedule around work. Anyway, I've heard a lot about some online LPN to RN programs, as well as RN to BSN. What I haven't heard much about are LPN to BSN programs. Does anyone have any experience with LPN to BSN? Seems like that would be the way to go if I want to get by BSN rather than doing LPN to RN then RN to BSN. So here's my question: Is an LPN to BSN program pretty much the same as RN to BSN? If not, what are the differences? I just feel like I would be skipping some steps? Thanks in advance for any info
    Excelsior has an LPN to BSN program. Linda
  13. by   txspadequeenRN
    EC has a RN to BSN program but not LPN to BSN unless things have changed in the last week.To the OP Indiana State University has a LPN to BSN program but they they involve the college network and thats a big mess in my eyes. I have been going to a LVN to BSN program at Tarleton State in Stephenville Texas. The only difference for me is the first semester they change some of the classes to transition classes and you have to have more of the pre-classes out of the way prior to being accepted. It is still 4 semesters of nursing classes and still 64 hours of pre-classes. The only benifits in my opinion is you dont have to wait to be a RN to get in and when you apply you are competing with LPN's only for spots in the program. Now the reason I did the LPN to BSN route is because the LVN to RN programs in my area are 3 semesters and the LVN to BSN was 4 semesters. To me it made more sense this way .. get it all done. but thats just me . Good luck to you



    Quote from Leo2
    Excelsior has an LPN to BSN program. Linda
  14. by   Leo2
    You are right I saw it on a college network ad, I was thinking EC but its a different school.

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