Excelsior Pass Rate? - page 5

Does anyone know Excelsior's passing rate? Just curious. tia Kelly... Read More

  1. by   Spazzy Nurse
    EC has since changed its admission criteria, since (IMHO) they were pretty lax about some of the people they were admitting to the program for a while there. I met a couple of people at my workshop and at my CPNE who had some pretty cruddy "experience". They were also admitting EMT-Basics to the program. Nothing against EMT-B's (I was one) but it's a 3 month course. Granted having years of experience as one gives you some pull, but there were people getting their EMT-B cert. just to be admitted to the program, and not even working as one.
    I for one am glad that EC has stepped up their admission criteria. It kind of makes us all look better. Maybe Cali. will change their minds in the future. I'm sure EC would like them too, since a giant percentage of their students come from there, according to the instructors at my workshop.
  2. by   MAXtheWonderDog
    Quote from KellyMarie37
    I have heard that the Excelsior ADN completion rate is between thirty and forty percent. The official first time pass rate for the dreaded CPNE is 68 percent.>>

    Ouch, these are not good pass rates. Wow, only 68%. I wonder what the percentage is for those who take the cpne 3 times & don't make it then.


    Kelly
    Consider myself one of those ^^^^^
    Excelsior is shady
  3. by   MAXtheWonderDog
    Quote from KellyMarie37
    You only get three chances at the CPNE, and then you are expelled form the program>>

    This seems like an awful waste of money as there is nothing to transfer to a traditional college.
    Do the CPNE boot camps help much or just as much of a failure rate with them?


    Kelly
    Prior to starting the program I had approx. 16 years of healthcare experience and am quite confident of my knowledge and abilities, I went through all the modules quickly and then I was failed ( I do not believe "I" failed so much as I "was failed" ) by examiners all three times, each time for reasons that were excelsiors liability in delivering the exam inconsistantly and not in compliance with the exam parameters. Did I protest/appeal, you bet. Did it matter, no.
    And for the record, every time I took the CPNE, MOST of the others students testing during the same time were failed as well. I encourage everyone considering EXCELSIOR to seriously reconsider a traditional school program. Because as I can attest, you can go through the entire program without difficulty and have all your time and monotary envestment thrown away at the end, without any recoarse.
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Spazzy Nurse
    Maybe Cali. will change their minds in the future. I'm sure EC would like them too, since a giant percentage of their students come from there, according to the instructors at my workshop.
    Yeah, I think they had maybe 5,000 students here? The problem though, is that a bunch of rules and regulations would have to be changed, or legislation would have to be passed, which is unlikely.

    May this wouldn't have happened if EC had tightened up on the admission requirements sooner. But since there was an investigation and record of all of these problems, I doubt they'll be able to do anything in California unless EC drastically changes their program, which is also unlikely.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 20, '04
  5. by   Spazzy Nurse
    Max---- this isn't directed at you, as I don't know the circumstances of your failed PCSs or how you prepared. Just know that before you read on.

    Many people with a lot of experience don't pass just because of that reason--- they have a lot of experience. Some go into it thinking "I know how to practice nursing" and that's what kicks their butt. The CPNE isn't entirely about how to practice nursing, it's also about how to follow the rules and play the game.

    Many nursing programs have similar completion rates--- my LPN class was less than the above stated 30-40% for EC. The 30-40% completion rate--- those are people who start the program and for whatever reason don't finish, whether it's because they decided they didn't like it, failed out of it, or more commonly, just lost the motivation to do it. It's a tough program that takes a ton of motivation.

    Boy, listen to me. I am starting to sound like Lizz.



    Quote from MAXtheWonderDog
    Prior to starting the program I had approx. 16 years of healthcare experience and am quite confident of my knowledge and abilities, I went through all the modules quickly and then I was failed ( I do not believe "I" failed so much as I "was failed" ) by examiners all three times, each time for reasons that were excelsiors liability in delivering the exam inconsistantly and not in compliance with the exam parameters. Did I protest/appeal, you bet. Did it matter, no.
    And for the record, every time I took the CPNE, MOST of the others students testing during the same time were failed as well. I encourage everyone considering EXCELSIOR to seriously reconsider a traditional school program. Because as I can attest, you can go through the entire program without difficulty and have all your time and monotary envestment thrown away at the end, without any recoarse.
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Spazzy Nurse
    Boy, listen to me. I am starting to sound like Lizz.
    Uh ... I hope that's not too bad of a thing.

  7. by   Spazzy Nurse
    Quote from lizz
    Uh ... I hope that's not too bad of a thing.

    .................................................. ...............................................
    :spin:
  8. by   BBFRN
    I agree with what SpazzyLizz says about the CPNE. Being an LPN myself, I did have to work to not think like a LPN and to think more like a RN for this exam, as well as the other nursing exams. Being a LPN can be a hinderance to those who think they're just going to go into the CPNE doing what they already do at work. There's a method to it all, and it's not hard if you follow the guidelines. I've never felt scammed or tricked by EC- I'm very happy with my experience in their program.
  9. by   MickyB-RN
    MOST of the others students testing during the same time were failed as well. I encourage everyone considering EXCELSIOR to seriously reconsider a traditional school program. Because as I can attest, you can go through the entire program without difficulty and have all your time and monotary envestment thrown away at the end, without any recoarse.>>

    Yes, I am thinking traditional is the way to go even though Excelsior would work much better with my schedule. I'm slowly working my way through the traditional way.
    I was thinking with their low pass rate there must be many who have lost much money.


    Kelly
  10. by   mona b RN
    Quote from Spazzy Nurse
    Boy, listen to me. I am starting to sound like Lizz.
    I don't think so Spazz.

    Anyway, I wonder if the wonderdog ever bothered to take the workshops. I would think after failing not only once, but twice, that a person would realize something's not working.

    Sounds like somebody's trolling to me. :uhoh21:


    mona
  11. by   featherzRN
    I didn't take a workshop, buy any special books or do anything but read the free guide provided by the school itself, and I passed doing the minimum three patients. As did 80% of my 'classmates'. Possibly my LVN school prepared me better to take the CPNE, but they were so disorganized I highly doubt it!
  12. by   MickyB-RN
    Anyway, I wonder if the wonderdog ever bothered to take the workshops. I would think after failing not only once, but twice, that a person would realize something's not working.

    Sounds like somebody's trolling to me>>

    Uh oh, not a good thing. The workshops seem like they would help. Ugh, I hate being on the fence about this. I'll just keep taking classes and I'll figure the answer out hopefully soon.


    Kelly
  13. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Ya know, not every program is for every body. Ya do whatcha have ta do if ya wanna be a nurse.

    EC gives students an opportunity to learn the material and only have to show up to take the test that demonstrates their knowledge. The program is set up to keep things as even and consistent between sites and across time as they possibly can. Many traditional schools aren't this consistent within individual classes, what with information shared with some students and not others (under the guise of "academic help").

    As for the CPNE, on the labs you only have to get 50% (you can retake all four stations if necessary, which sounds like 4 out of 8 to me), and on the PCS's, you only have to get 60% (three out of five). What more could you want? If you still can't get it, maybe you need to practice and prepare a little more or better.

    In my traditional school, anything under 69 was failing academically, and for anything under 85%, you failed a skills lab and were required to personally put in four hours of solid practicing under supervision in the skills lab. Forget about clinicals! You could be a total jerk and get an A--and a couple of people in my trad school class were and did. They knew (in most cases) the facts, but couldn't relate to patients or nurses worth bunk. One guy got into an argument with the housekeeper, raised his voice at her, caused her mop bucket to tip, which he determined was her assaulting him, and refused to apologize, and STILL GOT AN A IN THE CLASS!! (Incidentally, he can be licensed in California.)

    I think EC makes up for the relative lack of structure by making sure they build in as many fail-safes as possible. I've known people in a BSN program who thought they didn't need to swab a port and who felt that there was no need to follow protocol for sterile fields when changing the dressing on a CVP line. Bright girl academically, but her intuition was lacking.

    You know, I found that traditional school wasn't for me. I passed easily and I learned a lot, but I didn't care for the backbiting, I had trouble ignoring instructors' mispronunciations and misinformation (I worried I'd learn something wrong and hurt a patient one day), and believe it or not, the director and one instructor actively kept me from getting info I needed to prepare for an exam until 45 minutes before it started--I was at the school 45 minutes before that, so I missed the email the instructor was supposed to have sent a week earlier.

    EC is perfect for me. All the material is right there. The books and reading assignments are clear, and may be used, or you can find out your own info. I have done extremely well. I attended the CPNE and skills workshops and got the rough edges bumped off what I had learned in trad school. I expect to have a blast at the CPNE and I expect to pass.

    Traditional nursing school may be perfect for others, for whom EC might be a disaster. So be it, but that isn't a reflection on the schools or the programs, that's just a matter of "goodness of fit."

    And as for transferring credits from one nursing school to another, I'd like to hear from anybody who actually was able to do that, and the schools between which they transferred the credits. Each school determines their curriculum and all the little intrinsic details, to be approved (or not) by the NLN. So no two schools will ever be the same, unless they are using the exact same curriculum. It's not a shortcoming of EC, it's a fact of life.

    EC is very upfront about everything. I've never seen anything like it--among nursing schools or anything else. They are so upfront about the CPNE that there is a 7.5 lb manual that goes through every single niggling little aspect of it, including details about how to think about various steps and tasks. Jeez, what more could anybody want?

    As for California and licensing, if EC's policies "violated" (I think that was the word used, somewhere up there) California's BON's regs so badly, why did it take 20 or more years to get this ban? Take a look at the tuition costs of the state's schools of nursing and see if there isn't the slightest possibility that they might not want to see their tuition dollars heading to New York? Too many successful, terrific Excelsior College nurses out there for it to be because of poor skills or whatever. It's a big state--did they close down other schools whose graduates aren't all perfectly sterling nurses? Didn't think so.

    And Spazzy, you could never sound like lizz!!! They broke the mold....

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