Millennials flock to nursing, staving off shortage

  1. USA Today
    Jan. 6, 2018

    Millennials flock to nursing, staving off shortage

    INDIANAPOLIS - Millennials are saving the nursing profession.

    Facing a potential shortage due to Baby Boomers retiring, nursing has welcomed an unexpected surge of Millennials entering the field.

    Those Millennials are nearly twice as likely to be nurses as their grandparents' generation, the Baby Boomers, a recent Health Affairs study found. This trend has averted a potential workforce crisis and has implications for the future of nursing, said David Auerbach, one of the authors of the study.

    "Definitely the composition of the workforce is shifting. In just a few years there will be more Millennials than Baby Boomers in the nursing workforce," he said.

    Health Affairs Oct. 2917

    Millennials Almost Twice As Likely To Be Registered Nurses As Baby Boomers Were

    David I. Auerbach, Peter I. Buerhaus, Douglas O. Staiger

    Baby-boomer registered nurses (RNs), the largest segment of the RN workforce from 1981 to 2012, are now retiring. This would have led to nurse shortages but for the surprising embrace of the profession by millennials-who are entering the nurse workforce at nearly double the rate of the boomers. Still, the boomers' retirement will reduce growth in the size of the RN workforce to 1.3 percent per year for the period 2015–30.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jan 7
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   AJJKRN
    So someone finally admitted that there was no nursing shortage! (I mean no new nursing shortage anyways...)
  4. by   klone
    Great, now Millennials killed the nursing shortage!
  5. by   maxthecat
    Wonder how long they will put up with the working conditions at the bedside?
  6. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    YAY!!!

    Go millennials!!! Hopefully you guys will be able to take the ball & run with it. Take care of your patients but take damn good care of yourselves to
  7. by   12yrRN
    The majority of the new grads coming into our hospital are coming in already planning how to get out of bedside nursing. A lot are continuing on to start NP programs immediately. Have heard more than once "this isn't going to be my forever job" while they are training. Tough time to be starting out due to the current healthcare environment, understaffing and cost cutting, flat wage scales so I do understand their thinking. Reality is though, there are many more jobs "on the floors" and with direct patient care than without. There are some but then most nurses I have seen have to give up the flexibility found in a 24/7 environment and work five days a week and take some level of pay cut.

    Also, starting wage for a associate degree nurse is good but, at least in our area, the benefits are very poor, expensive insurance with very high copays, etc. Also, entire half of our state controlled by two hospital systems resulting in kind of a monopoly situation where there is no competition. Our scale tops out at 10 years with no further increases except yearly cost of living so returns start to diminish even though starting wage is good.
  8. by   Mr_Edwino
    Well, I hope that healthcare provides them that "safe space" that they have been seeking out.
  9. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Mr_Edwino
    Well, I hope that healthcare provides them that "safe space" that they have been seeking out.
    You've got sassy pants on today, don't you!
  10. by   Mr_Edwino
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    I am going to remember this and be even more excited when you like my stuff from now on.

    No pressure.

    (Please like me)
    For real

    (See I can do this too! It's fun, yay!)
  11. by   NurseSpeedy
    Quote from maxthecat
    Wonder how long they will put up with the working conditions at the bedside?
    You see, that's where things will collapse. From what I've seen, many are using the bedside as a stepping stone, not a career. Many are also quitting before their contracts are even completed. Multiple others have stated that they're just working while they finish their NP. Or, my favorite, putting in those 1-2 years before going into management...okay, I'm going to stop there because that's a whole new thread...
  12. by   osceteacher
    I don't see the correlation between millenials being twice as likely to be nurses than their baby boomer grandparents and it affecting staff shortages. If thats the only metric they're using, which is the only one I can see, then thats completely ignoring that the population has more than doubled as well as people living longer with multiple co-morbidities has skyrocketed and thus the overall workforce need has more than doubled. If theirs a higher demand, theirs a higher chance of going in to that profession.

    It seems like lazy journalism to me.
  13. by   nursesunny
    Lord help me! I just SERIOUSLY asked my daughter..."sweetheart, never try to take care of me at home (21 year old) I think if I need care you should put me in a nursing home"...ummm because her generation is on social media 8 hours per day and most of her friends haven't even had a job yet, now you tell me my safe place to land has been corrupted by her peers! LOL...

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