Should a nurse perform CPR to someone outside of the healthcare setting? - page 3

Should a nurse perform CPR to someone outside of the healthcare setting? Is it safe?... Read More

  1. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from elkpark
    (That reminds me -- many years ago, when I was in nursing school and all hepped up about having learned CPR for the first time, my father, a physician, took me aside to tell me in all seriousness that, if he ever fell over dead in front of me, I should not waste any time fooling around with CPR, but just cut him open and do direct cardiac massage. He explained to me in great detail (and pointing to landmarks on his torso) exactly where and how I should cut and exactly how to do the direct massage. The whole conversation was practically traumatizing. He was always openly scornful of CPR, and used to say the only thing it was good for was to give the staff nurses on the floor something to do to feel useful while they were waiting for the code team to arrive -- he considered starting CPR out in the field idiotic. For better or worse, I've inherited his views. )

    Cute post. BTW- I am a "DNR", but it's not tattoed on my chest, yet- so think twice about a lawsuit if you get too close to ME. In my view of myself- I coded for a reason, and it's time to 'kiss the sky'~
  2. Visit  akulahawkRN profile page
    1
    Quote from SuzieVN
    Cute post. BTW- I am a "DNR", but it's not tattoed on my chest, yet- so think twice about a lawsuit if you get too close to ME. In my view of myself- I coded for a reason, and it's time to 'kiss the sky'~
    Just make absolutely certain that you've got the right paperwork or appropriate substitute (like a recognized medallion) on your person at all times. Without the correct documentation, you will likely be resuscitated. The lay rescuer typically has NO idea what a DNR is, and should that person begin CPR on you, Good Sam would protect them from lawsuit. I will check for evidence of a current, valid DNR and if I find one, I'm either going to stop CPR or I'm not even going to start...
    carolinapooh likes this.
  3. Visit  wmisaacharris profile page
    3
    So when you become a nurse and say the nightingale pledge, that only pertains to when your at work? I believe A REAL nurse is a nurse at home, a nurse in the car, a nurse at the gym, a nurse at a restaurant, a nurse at a wedding, a nurse in the park, a nurse in bed, a nurse in the swimming pool, a nurse at the mall, etc. If you know how to save them, and yes a nurse is obligated to save them, then save them!! Good Sam will protect you as long as you stay "in your scope of practice". Don't do anything a doctor would do. Do what a Nurse would do.
    Anonymous865, laxbam7, and GadgetRN71 like this.
  4. Visit  xoemmylouox profile page
    3
    I will always try to help. If it was me going down I certainly hope someone would try to save me. CPR is far from perfect, but it sure beats doing nothing until advanced help arrives.
  5. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from xoemmylouox
    I will always try to help. If it was me going down I certainly hope someone would try to save me. CPR is far from perfect, but it sure beats doing nothing until advanced help arrives.
    Unless you ultimately end up in a vegetative state. But, I once had a BF and we discussed this to no end. His final argument, and conviction: I don't care what happens to me physically. If my mind can still function, even if I cannot communicate, but I can think- I don't even care if I am totally paralyzed and in a chair- I want to live. Not so for me.
  6. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    1
    I have done rescue breathing for someone who had signal breaths and an adequate pulse, while the other bystander tried to prevent me from doing that ; no chest compressions as of yet outside of a facility.

    Regardless of he situation, I would try my best in the situation any way I can.
    Anonymous865 likes this.
  7. Visit  GadgetRN71 profile page
    2
    I believe that we all have an obligation to help each other, nurse or no. I would have a big problem with a lay person who knows CPR ignoring someone who needs it. FWIW, my dad has performed CPR out in the field twice( he's a retired firefighter) and both times not only got a pulse back, both people lived. I was always under the impression that CPR wasn't meant to bring someone back, but to buy time until the big guns arrived.

    I would do CPR outside of my workplace.
    Anonymous865 and carolinapooh like this.
  8. Visit  GadgetRN71 profile page
    0
    Quote from SuzieVN
    Unless you ultimately end up in a vegetative state. But, I once had a BF and we discussed this to no end. His final argument, and conviction: I don't care what happens to me physically. If my mind can still function, even if I cannot communicate, but I can think- I don't even care if I am totally paralyzed and in a chair- I want to live. Not so for me.
    I agree with your BF, I would want to live too, if I still had brain function. But,people are different.
  9. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    2
    Quote from GadgetRN71
    I agree with your BF, I would want to live too, if I still had brain function. But,people are different.
    Take me 'out', please- no incapacities, whatsoever, thanks. . .
    Ayvah and RunnerRN2015 like this.
  10. Visit  xoemmylouox profile page
    3
    The problem is some people come back with fully functioning lives. You don't know what the outcome will be so hence always start the CPR. I don't want to be on a vent for the rest of my life with no ability to move, think, etc, but I sure as hell want the chance to recover. I have seen patient who have coded more than once and have come back to live normal lives, sure they aren't the norm, but it DOES happen.
    Anonymous865, carolinapooh, and Sadala like this.
  11. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    0
    I might if I believed circumstances supported statistically strong odds of a good outcome. I haven't ever had occasion to thus far. I hope I never do.
  12. Visit  Sadala profile page
    0
    Unless the person was clearly dead (and I've had that happen btw - found someone dead with extensive lividity) - I would do CPR (unless there was a DNR).

    And if I had a loved one who was not attended to by a bystander with knowledge then God help that person if there was any question that there might have been a save.

    Read this and then explain to me how you could just stand there.

    Cardiac survival rate in Seattle rises again
  13. Visit  calivianya profile page
    3
    I like what the latest ACLS guidelines say. I got so tickled I went into a crazy laughing fit while I was studying for the exam. This is from the 2010 manual page 90, if anyone cares: "The resuscitation team must make a conscientious and competent effort to give patients "a trial of CPR and ACLS," provided the patient had not expressed a decision to forego resuscitative efforts and the victim is not obviously dead (eg, rigor mortis, decomposition, hemisection, decapitation)."

    Okay, so... running with those guidelines, anyone but a decapitated, cut in half person who's obviously decomposing is pretty much fair game for CPR in the field. I really enjoyed how they defined obviously dead... maybe I just have a really morbid sense of humor. I think these guidelines are reasonable and I would absolutely give someone in the field a chance... as long as they weren't decapitated! Can you even imagine some idiot trying to perform CPR on a decapitated person?


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