Major Vent Major Vent - pg.7 | allnurses

Major Vent - page 10

So this has lately been a pet peeve of mine at work, patients that live in this country and speak NO English. I can totally understand and sympathize with how scary it must be to be visiting get sick... Read More

  1. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    #78 1
    Quote from gm2rn
    well, it might surprise you to know that i agree with everything you said. but, it really has nothing to do with what i was trying to convey in my post.

    as for the people in this country who don't speak english, well, i really don't even want to get started because it just makes me angry. i'll just say that i totally agree with you and leave it at that.

    however, i do feel that we need to do what is necessary to care for those patients who truly cannot speak any english when they come to us because our primary job is to care for their health in that moment. their lack of speaking english could be part of discharge planning when they are well enough to address it.
    it does surprise me to know that you agree with everything i said! it may surprise you to know that i also feel we need to do what is necessary to care for patients who truly cannot speak or understand any english . . . what is necessary for their health care. i lack patience for trying to communicate things like "your doctor ordered a carb controlled diet; you can't have pudding" or "you cannot smoke in the bathroom" more than three or four times, even if the patient speaks no english. that may be a flaw in my character. i'll bend over backwards to find a translator for things like "you need a valve replacement" or "what would you like us to do if dad's heart stops?" or "you had a sternal incision, so don't use your arms to pull yourself up".


  2. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    #79 0
    Quote from Fribblet
    Right because there are no other resources to utilize other than this one nurse who must now leave his or her patients to deal with someone else's patient who would too inconvenienced to call a translator or use a language line.

    Who cares about their patient load? This nurse should do the job of the translator without compensation because it's selfish of a nurse to reject taking on the responsibilities of another department who the hospital is willing to pay a yearly salary to.

    Not to mention that if one hasn't been trained, or able to verify prior to taking on translation duties, that one is indeed fluent and is well versed in medical terminology (of that language), there could be legal implications. In fact, I would be willing to bet money that there ARE legal implications for acting in the capacity of an official translator when one is not an "official" translator.

    But screw that, he shouldn't be compensated and should potentially risk his career to save the hospital a few bucks.

    Nurses will continue to be poorly compensated and mistreated by their employers as long as they keep acting like doormats. There is nothing wrong with expecting compensation for taking on an entire new job in addition to the one you currently have.

    see post #75
  3. Visit  Fribblet profile page
    #80 0
    Quote from GM2RN
    see post #75
    Right. It starts with the urgent situations (and I agree if it's urgent and there's no time to call the translator, those who can speak the language should help. HOWEVER, you did not address the legal risks. If the patient claimed any sort of miscommunication, the nurse has just assumed A BIG, possibly career ending, liability. Not worth it. Translators will respond quickly if you tell them it's dire.) then it progresses to issues that need to be dealt with in timely matter, then it goes to "Well, you did it for so and so, why are you refusing now? Then, you get complaints and write ups for "not being a team player."

    And, when you demand more money for taking on an additional job, you get accused of being selfish and a "bad nurse" and someone with a bad attitude....

    Yeah. You give an inch, they'll take a mile and will not pay for the gas.

    (Also, in emergent situations, the nurse should only provide reassurance, imo, but should never involve themselves in obtaining verbal consent or being responsible for translating risks/benefits and procedures. The person who is trained and sanctioned by the hospital as being qualified for that should be doing it. "Helping" out should not result in the suspension or revocation of one's license. Period.

    I'm a team player, but I'm not breaking the law, practicing outside my scope of practice or deviating from hospital policy so people won't think that I'm not a "team player."

    But honestly, if I spoke spanish, I'd go tell someone's patient that they couldn't smoke or have caffeine or whatever. I'd still be ****** when I started doing that for EVERYBODY. And, once you've started, it's hard to stop.
    Last edit by Fribblet on Sep 1, '10
  4. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    #81 0
    Quote from ruby vee
    it does surprise me to know that you agree with everything i said! it may surprise you to know that i also feel we need to do what is necessary to care for patients who truly cannot speak or understand any english . . . what is necessary for their health care. i lack patience for trying to communicate things like "your doctor ordered a carb controlled diet; you can't have pudding" or "you cannot smoke in the bathroom" more than three or four times, even if the patient speaks no english. that may be a flaw in my character. i'll bend over backwards to find a translator for things like "you need a valve replacement" or "what would you like us to do if dad's heart stops?" or "you had a sternal incision, so don't use your arms to pull yourself up".


    i figured you'd agree once i elaborated a bit.

    when it comes right down to it, i think most nurses would do whatever it takes to get their patients actual needs met, but we all get frustrated with the bs. it's understandable when some patients are so demanding and we have so little time to get everything done.

    it's also frustrating when you work with nurses who refuse to get off their behinds to help with anything that doesn't involve their own patients, and sometimes not even then. so while i truly understand what it's like to have more responsibility piled on for no more compensation, i also believe--and this is not as a result of anything that you said--that it's short-sighted to ignore a patient's needs when it might result in poor care.
  5. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    #82 0
    Quote from Fribblet
    Right. It starts with the urgent situations (and I agree if it's urgent and there's no time to call the translator, those who can speak the language should help. HOWEVER, you did not address the legal risks. If the patient claimed any sort of miscommunication, the nurse has just assumed A BIG, possibly career ending, liability. Not worth it. Translators will respond quickly if you tell them it's dire.) then it progresses to issues that need to be dealt with in timely matter, then it goes to "Well, you did it for so and so, why are you refusing now? Then, you get complaints and write ups for "not being a team player."

    And, when you demand more money for taking on an additional job, you get accused of being selfish and a "bad nurse" and someone with a bad attitude....

    Yeah. You give an inch, they'll take a mile and will not pay for the gas.

    (Also, in emergent situations, the nurse should only provide reassurance, imo, but should never involve themselves in obtaining verbal consent or being responsible for translating risks/benefits and procedures. The person who is trained and sanctioned by the hospital as being qualified for that should be doing it. "Helping" out should not result in the suspension or revocation of one's license. Period.

    I'm a team player, but I'm not breaking the law, practicing outside my scope of practice or deviating from hospital policy so people won't think that I'm not a "team player."

    whatever, see post #81

    If you have any further problems with my opinions, have it your way. I've been involved in two separate threads on this same topic at the same time and I'm done with it.
  6. Visit  Fribblet profile page
    #83 0
    Quote from GM2RN
    whatever, see post #81

    If you have any further problems with my opinions, have it your way. I've been involved in two separate threads on this same topic at the same time and I'm done with it.
    I'm sorry you are offended that I disagreed with you.

    Good luck finding a place where no one thinks you may be wrong.
  7. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    #84 0
    Quote from Fribblet
    I'm sorry you are offended that I disagreed with you.

    Good luck finding a place where no one thinks you may be wrong.

    Never said I was offended, just that I'm done. LOL I love it when people put words into my mouth.
  8. Visit  Fribblet profile page
    #85 0
    Quote from GM2RN
    Never said I was offended, just that I'm done. LOL I love it when people put words into my mouth.
    I'm sorry to disappoint you, as that was not at all what I did.

    If you need me to "translate" the phrase, which you have misused and possibly misunderstood, I'll be happy to help.
  9. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    #86 0
    Quote from Fribblet
    I'm sorry to disappoint you, as that was not at all what I did.

    If you need me to "translate" the phrase, which you have misused and possibly misunderstood, I'll be happy to help.

    You have to care to be disappointed, and I don't care about your opinion on this topic at this point. Even if you fundamentally disagree with me, you still have refused to admit that you have attributed things to me that I never said, which are blatantly clear when you compare my posts to yours. So, as I said before, have it your way. It's no skin off my nose.
  10. Visit  bagladyrn profile page
    #87 0
    Quote from nursinger
    Compensated for translating??? Are you kidding??? That's right up there with Bristol Palin being a teenager's role model. (go ahead, delete it)
    Actually I have been at a couple of hospitals in my travels at which staff (including ancillary staff) WERE compensated for translating. They received an additional amount per hour after passing a test done by a professional interpreter for that language specifically referencing medical terminology. They were then placed on a list available to the staff.
  11. Visit  DarkBluePhoenix profile page
    #88 0
    Is is me or do immigrates get better accommodations than citizens...looks like thats the direction this country is taking

    time to move!
  12. Visit  badphish profile page
    #89 0
    1. My wife a US citizen. Born in puerto Rico. A us commonwealth. Like umm let's see DC
    Does not speak fluent English so what. It's not the dominant language on the island. Guess what I learned spanish. Also be aware. Due to abuse issues she never finished grade school

    So let's prejudge everyone that they gave the sane education as us and opportunity to learn a very difficult language english.

    2nd. Learn a language. Us nurses are all very educated. Carry a phrasebook. Draw pictures. Point

    Whatever


    Really is this the thing that is crippling our healthcare system


    Please

    I've been to seven countries delivered medical care in all of them to natives. With a either a phrase book or gestures or pretty pictures

    U can too

    I'm absolutely certain that JC. Himself spoke only English. King James English. As a matter of fact

    Maybe we all need to learn Chinese. Since they outnumber us.

    Personally everyone after HS should do 2 years service overseas. Then get college a vocational job whatever

    Believe your patients WANT to communicate with you

    I'm out
    This thread disgusts me
  13. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    #90 3
    People living in the United States who don't learn to speak English are harming themselves in the long run in ways that don't meet the eye at first, and that thread weaves itself through their entire experience here. It permeates everything. Suppose you have been diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer and you need to travel outside your immediate neighborhood, and you take a turn for the worse. You have no choice but to go to the local ER in a strange city without a high percentage of people who speak your first language. When they ask you why you are there you take a folded up paper written in English out of your wallet that says "yourname has stage 4 colon cancer etc" and wordlessly hand it to the nurse. Does it really matter at that point if America is a melting pot and English is too hard to learn and.. .? That is #%@$& terrifying. And it happened to my friend. People who want to frame it as a lack of cultural sensitivity and the weight of accomodation on those who speak the dominant language may feel good about themselves but for other than a short-term visitor it is a net negative.

    I happily speak Spanish while I'm at work to people who don't speak English. I don't think of it as a political issue. Many of my co-workers actively refuse to learn another language as a political statement. It's frustrating and time-consuming to play charades and point at things, and I'm not patient enough to spend 10 minutes trying to convey something that should take 2 minutes.

    Poor written language skills hold people back as well, but probably if you don't intend to climb the career ladder as far as your talents can take you it doesn't matter as much.

close