Is English required to be an RN?

  1. I have noticed from day one in here that many RNs use some of the poorest English and grammar I have ever seen. I am sure that we were required to take English as a requirement to graduate from nursing school. Did we leave it in the classroom, or is it that it was never really learned? I see from the charts I read at work that the case is the same in actual practice. I see so much chatroomease that it makes me sick to read some of the postings in here. Are we professionals that want to sound the part or simply chatroom fools? I for one at least try to sound and act professional. As RNs we have a reputation to be knowledgable and professional. Where are you?
    Last edit by Jailhouse RN on Jul 12, '04
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  2. 118 Comments

  3. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    I have noticed from day one in here that many RNs use some of the poorest English and grammar I have ever seen. I am sure that we were required to take English as a requirement to graduate from nursing school. Did we leave it in the classroom, or is it that it was never really learned? I see from the charts I read at work that the case is the same in actual practice. I see so much chatroomease that it makes me sick to read some of the postings in here. Are we professionals that want to sound the part or somply chatroom fools? I for one at least try to sound and act professional. As RNs we have a reputation to be knowledgable and professional. Where are you?
    Yes, I have noticed that also, but not as much as foreign MDs and their discharge summaries! Ever read any of those nightmares? Wrong subject, wrong verb, run-on sentances, and so on. We used to laugh about them in the nursing home where I worked! If we can't enforce English as a language, we most certainly can't assume that it will be used in a professional way!
  4. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    I have noticed from day one in here that many RNs use some of the poorest English and grammar I have ever seen. I am sure that we were required to take English as a requirement to graduate from nursing school. Did we leave it in the classroom, or is it that it was never really learned? I see from the charts I read at work that the case is the same in actual practice. I see so much chatroomease that it makes me sick to read some of the postings in here. Are we professionals that want to sound the part or somply chatroom fools? I for one at least try to sound and act professional. As RNs we have a reputation to be knowledgable and professional. Where are you?
    We have debated this topic ad nauseum over the years....Many of us use this forum to relax-think "nurse's lounge" Taking shortcuts in our posts does not mean that we are un-professional in our charting and communication in realtime...There seems to be 2 groups here-the first thinks that we should be able to say anything here and the second thinks we have to "front" because the public does have access to this site...Personally I don't feel that proper grammar and correct spelling is really what makes a good nurse....I do think that being as non-judgemental as possible IS important....
  5. by   reprise
    Quote from Jailhouse RN
    I have noticed from day one in here that many RNs use some of the poorest English and grammar I have ever seen. I am sure that we were required to take English as a requirement to graduate from nursing school. Did we leave it in the classroom, or is it that it was never really learned? I see from the charts I read at work that the case is the same in actual practice. I see so much chatroomease that it makes me sick to read some of the postings in here. Are we professionals that want to sound the part or somply chatroom fools? I for one at least try to sound and act professional. As RNs we have a reputation to be knowledgable and professional. Where are you?
    As a medical consumer, I find the notion of semi-literate healthcare professionals extremely scary. How can I trust people who are sloppy with the written word when discussing their profession will not be equally inattentive to detail when practising it? I want to know that whoever is providing my medical care will query anything which is ambiguous or which seems unusual - I don't want them assuming that they "know" what was really intended when they come across an apparent error in my notes and deciding to take actions based on their interpetation. I sure as heck don't want someone who is imprecise about the written word to be actually writing up my notes, either. If you can't spell the name of the drug, then you most certainly should not be allowed to administer it.
  6. by   Tweety
    Guilty as charged. Guess I'm not a good nurse because I have poor spelling and grammar on a bulletin board.

    I did however make As when writing papers for my English courses in college.
  7. by   bsnecu99
    Quote from reprise
    As a medical consumer, I find the notion of semi-literate healthcare professionals extremely scary. How can I trust people who are sloppy with the written word when discussing their profession will not be equally inattentive to detail when practising it? I want to know that whoever is providing my medical care will query anything which is ambiguous or which seems unusual - I don't want them assuming that they "know" what was really intended when they come across an apparent error in my notes and deciding to take actions based on their interpetation. I sure as heck don't want someone who is imprecise about the written word to be actually writing up my notes, either. If you can't spell the name of the drug, then you most certainly should not be allowed to administer it.
    I'm sorry, are you a nurse? Or just a "consumer." If you are just a consumer you have no idea how illiterate some foreign doctors are. I also did medical transcription before becoming a nurse and on one tape, I just had to pass. I could NOT understand a single word! My dad reported to me that during his reconstructive surgery he had a medical consult from a foreign doctor whose interpreter followed closely behind. Now, doesn't that scare the pants off 'ya? :uhoh21:
  8. by   Maggie Mae
    Jailhouse RN this be the 2nd time you posted about this. Not much you can do but be a shinning example yourself.
  9. by   Maggie Mae
    P.S. What does "somply" mean?
  10. by   jnette
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    Guilty as charged. Guess I'm not a good nurse because I have poor spelling and grammar on a bulletin board.

    I did however make As when writing papers for my English courses in college.
    Tweety...Whooooot !

    This IS a bulletin board ... not a legal document.

    What I write here is often tongue in cheek, or deliberate "carrying on" type of chatter. I'm writing in the "moment" as I would carry on with friends. It by no means reflects my professionalism or ability to recognize when it is inappropriate.

    Sometimes here in a good discussion our fingers fly faster than our heads are spelling... that's ok here.. again... this is not an excercise in charting, but friendly conversation.

    While I'm rather anal about spelling and grammar myself, I can overlook it here, as I'm not expecting perfection on a BB, just good converstion, friendship, advice, and encouragement.

    To each his own.
  11. by   angel337
    excuse me if i am wrong, but i thought this board was informal. i wasn't aware that we were required to write text book essays when posting a topic. i agree that how you communicate on paper (especially charting) leaves an impression, but people don't post on this board just to worry about being criticized if what they type isn't perfect. it takes away from the atmosphere that allnurses has provided, which is an environment that people can feel comfortable venting/discussing things they normally couldn't at work. just my 5 cents.
  12. by   CCU NRS
    Quote from reprise
    As a medical consumer, I find the notion of semi-literate healthcare professionals extremely scary. How can I trust people who are sloppy with the written word when discussing their profession will not be equally inattentive to detail when practising it? I want to know that whoever is providing my medical care will query anything which is ambiguous or which seems unusual - I don't want them assuming that they "know" what was really intended when they come across an apparent error in my notes and deciding to take actions based on their interpetation. I sure as heck don't want someone who is imprecise about the written word to be actually writing up my notes, either. If you can't spell the name of the drug, then you most certainly should not be allowed to administer it.
    So are you a nurse or do you work in the medical field? If so you should know that nurses do not act on notes only orders. Orders are written many times by doctors that write illegibly and must be interpreted prior to continuing, if a nurse can not clearly understand an order (I) they will call for a clarification. I don't think that the way a person talks in a chatroom or on a BB can be used as a qualifier to their intelligence or how they present themselves in a work situation.

    As a healthcare consumer you are encouraged and should ask any and all questions you have. If the answers you recieve are insufficient or unsatisfactory you should seek second opinions, ask the physician personally or look it up and investigate it yourself. If you find that a nurse has given you incorrect information you should report it immediately.

    cya l8tr
  13. by   Havin' A Party!
    Quote from Maggie Mae
    ... "somply"...
    Noticed that immediately too. Thought it was a little funny in the context of the post.

    Not raggin' on ya, Mag. Agree with the poor English, etc. often seen in medical charts and other documentation at work... much of it the handiwork of (er, er, er) nurses.

    Think we should all strive to do better.
  14. by   will7678
    I ain't got to use no good grammer. Why you frontin'?


    p.s. I recieved an A in eng and my proffessor recommended me to the department for advanced classes (you need a professors recommendation).

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