canadian lpn not a "nurse"? - page 3

Hello all, let me begin by saying I am in the lpn program and loving it. The other day, I was told by a presently employed lpn that lpns are just NOT nurses. She firmly told me that the world... Read More

  1. Visit  thsnursluvsgeriatric profile page
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    I am a Canadian LPN, I am a nurse, I can start IV's, hang meds, call the doctor, fill his orders, talk to pharmacy, have meds shipped over, assess clients. I have worked as an LPN for 13 years. I worked as a HCA for more then a decade ac becoming an lpn. Was I a nurse when I was a HCA, I did not consider myself one, but I did consider myself part of the nursing staff.

    The 'Nurses' at this facility LPN's and RN's hosted a party for the residents. We as HCA's were not invited. I along with my partner stood at the entrance of the activity room, the program was good, and at the end
    Edna RN announced this 'and this is the Nursing Staff of ----- Home.'
    Who was left out, the main caregivers, the frontline staff. This was crushing for us, we had become an entity that defied description.

    I think we are all very important, we all have a role. We are all nursing staff.

    So for those people that do not consider Lpn's a Nurse please solve this puzzle for me, tell me, what am I?
  2. Visit  char1976 profile page
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    LPNs in New-Brunswick do the same work as LPNs in other provinces, but still can't use the term "NURSE". The term has been protected in NB, and can only be used to describe the registered nurse and the nurse practioner I beleive. Anyhow, I know an LPN can not describe herself as a nurse. I also am VERY puzzled and upset about this. I'm not an "assistant" , yet I'm not a "nurse" either, so what am I exactly?
    I wonder if the term "Nurse" was protected in your provinces also, and did they just add the LPN to their list of nurse once the title changed from RNA? I wonder if this will ever change in my province, or is it legally impossible?

    Thanks
  3. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
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    Dear Original Poster: have you thought about contacting your provincial college of LPNS? They will know the answer to your question. Each college has an archive of the change in roles of the PN in that province. Part of our annual license fees in action....
  4. Visit  char1976 profile page
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    Hello, thanks for your reply.
    Yes, I did check with my provincial college of LPNs, and that is the answer that they gave me: " New-Brunswick is the only province in Canada that the title NURSE has been protected". That's all he could really tell me on the subject. It's like they don't want to talk about it over here. It's like they have the attitude "why open up a can of worms"? Maybe I would be better off speaking with a lawyer, he/she could at least tell me if it's worth even fighting for, if it's worth telling the LPNs aroud here that we are the ONLY province that LPNs are not concidered nurses! We are the only province that hasn't EVOLVED if you ask me. I've noticed that no one even knows about this. The LPNs that I have mentioned this too just look at me like I'm totaly making this up, instead of saying "we should really fight for our rights too! We deserved the recongnition too!"
    Well, thanks for letting me vent.
    This is a great site and most people are very helpful and supportive.
  5. Visit  PamelaJean profile page
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    I am currently a practicing LPN in Manitoba. The only skills I can not perform at work are IV push, central line care and epidural care. I can not mix IV insulin as an LPN as well. I am also in the third year of my bachelor's degree at the UofM and the education I received as an LPN has better prepared me for duties as a NURSE! The education the degree nurses are receiving in this province is joke. The degree program is preparing students for primary health and administration. The RN diploma and LPN programs are training students to be bedside nurses. The shortage is in hospitals and these are the type of nurses that are needed at present across the country.
    Last edit by Jay-Jay on Nov 13, '06 : Reason: quoting deleted post
  6. Visit  PamelaJean profile page
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    You can't give an injection to a five year old because LPN's are only licensed to care for stable patients, and kids are not considered stable.[/quote]


    Oh one more thing as an LPN I care for paediatric patients on a daily basis. I can give them medication and injections. I can start IVs and run IV meds for them as well. Children's hospital in Calgary employs a large number of LPNs and they don't just care for the pt.s over 5.
  7. Visit  ms_orion profile page
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    Are titles different in Canada? LPN in the United States=Licensed Practical Nurse. Uh...yeah..."Nurse" I am an RN...and many of my co-workers are LPN's....We are all NURSES If the rules are the same in Canada then your friend needs some educating.
  8. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
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    Quote from PamelaJean
    You can't give an injection to a five year old because LPN's are only licensed to care for stable patients, and kids are not considered stable.

    Oh one more thing as an LPN I care for paediatric patients on a daily basis. I can give them medication and injections. I can start IVs and run IV meds for them as well. Children's hospital in Calgary employs a large number of LPNs and they don't just care for the pt.s over 5.[/quote]

    I think Gaijingal is a troll. Hasn't been back since.

    The thing I mentioned is that LPN's are licensed to vaccinate anyone over the age of five. I can not vaccinate a child born Oct 3, 2001, but I can immunize a child born Oct. 1, 2001. Nobody has ever explained this one to us to a satifactory level. Don't tell me that two days make a big difference and we are talking children for school shots. Never mind in the hospital. Stable, unstable it doesn't matter on my unit, if the bed's empty and its filled its my patient in that bed.
  9. Visit  wannabesedated profile page
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    I was told in my intro to nursing course that the term "nurse" is reserved for registered nurses only, and unless you're a registered nurse you cannot call yourself a nurse. LPN's have to go by "practical nurse". To me, I don't see the difference, they both have nurse in the title, they're both nurses..
  10. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
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    I checked this one with the head of my RPN program in Ontario and she said all RNs and RPNs liscenced by the CNO are legally called nurses.
  11. Visit  txspadequeenRN profile page
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    GEZZZZ, things are sure different here in the states......
    Last edit by Jay-Jay on Nov 13, '06 : Reason: quoting deleted post
  12. Visit  loriangel14 profile page
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    There must be some fundamental differences betweenLPN and RPN.RPN now is 2.5 years and when I am an RPN I will have no age restriction on who I can care for.
  13. Visit  Jay-Jay profile page
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    No, they are the same. RPN is the older terminology. Around the time I started my nursing progam, Ontario changed the term from RPN to LPN. I know because I have a good friend who was an RPN (now retired.) I am not really sure why there are restrictions on the giving of vaccines. It may have to do with them being given I.M., which is an extended-class skill for LPN's requiring special certification.

    It could also be that different colleges/different provinces have different regulations.

    I have deleted gaijingal's post, as it is rude, and gives incorrect information. Sorry I missed it the first time around!
    Last edit by Jay-Jay on Nov 13, '06

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