Graduated 2010 almost gave up nursing.

  1. 0
    Hello everyone.
    I came to US when I was 19 to study nursing. I graduated from nursing school in 2010 in Texas and passed NCLEX in Aug 2010...but being an international student and recently married, I had a very difficult time searching for a job. That time, I only had one year working permit. My husband is an American citizen, so we decided to go ahead and apply for permanent residency (green card) to increase the opportunity to get hired. So I received my new status as a permanent residency while working in a restaurant. Since both of our families are outside of the US, we had to take a long vacation to have wedding receptions in both of our countries. It had been a year and a half by the time I came back from weddings.

    Now that I have permanent residency, finished wedding stuff, and ready to find a job! BUT....I forgot a lot of stuff....and nobody wants to hire someone like me with no experience, and English is my second language....especially in a economy like this. I started studying and feel like I'm slowly getting back what I studied in school. Yet....it's hard to keep the motivation up not knowing if I can find a job ever....

    I am even thinking to give up nursing and work for somewhere else where I could make a use of my first language.
    Yes, I spent a lot of money in nursing school. Yes, I studied so hard that I shed tears so many times. Yes, I have wanted to be a nurse for such a long time. But is there still a chance for me?
    Right now, I don't care where I work, in which field, or how much I get paid. I just wanna get hired! My husband is willing to help me and even told me it's ok to move. (but we bought a house two years ago!)
    Any tips, advices, suggestions, rebukes/ ideas?

    Thank you for reading!
  2. 12,006 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 18 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    It would seem like such a waste to have gone through all that education and NOT go into nursing. However, you have been out awhile so getting a job now. . honestly, will be hard. I think you should apply for some nurse tech jobs and start working the floors. Show them that you are good, hard working and knowledgeable. Then, when they do have an RN opening. . you will be a great candidate for them to hire. . . you know the floor, the patients, how things operate . . AND they know you. Its a good way to work your way in and warm back up to nursing. It might not pay the greatest but in the long run it would pay off. I was a Respiratory Therapist for 13 years before I finished my RN degree. Going from a 13 year RRT to a new grad RN required a substantial pay cut. . but in the long run it was worth it. You have a similar situation facing you. . . sometimes you have to sacrifice to get to your final goal. Good luck!!!
  5. 0
    hey GoingCoastalRNCCRN, so u are saying if though if you have an RN license, you could work as a nurse tech? how do i go about applying for a job like that? is there a course for nurse techs too?
  6. 0
    Not many states let an RN work as a tech once they have passed NCLEX. There may be volunteer positions that you can do to network, volunteers are considered internal employee's and thus have access to internal positions and most facilities hire from within.

    Try Home Healthcare, LTCs, flu shot clinics, or take some higher level certifications to make your resume jump out. ACLS, PALS, NRP, ECG/EKG Interpreting.
  7. 2
    Have you tried applying in the LTC facilities? You can start there. I understand you have been out of school for a while and you feel like you don't remember much, but even as a new grad you never feel like you know much, school work and the real world of nursing are totally different, that's why we get orientations/training, so this should not be a problem for you, just keep on trying and don't give up, search for agencies as well so they can send you to to work in people's homes or nursing homes as needed, and try LTC facilities as well. I'll be praying for you. Good luck.

    Quote from MayuZ
    Hello everyone.
    I came to US when I was 19 to study nursing. I graduated from nursing school in 2010 in Texas and passed NCLEX in Aug 2010...but being an international student and recently married, I had a very difficult time searching for a job. That time, I only had one year working permit. My husband is an American citizen, so we decided to go ahead and apply for permanent residency (green card) to increase the opportunity to get hired. So I received my new status as a permanent residency while working in a restaurant. Since both of our families are outside of the US, we had to take a long vacation to have wedding receptions in both of our countries. It had been a year and a half by the time I came back from weddings.

    Now that I have permanent residency, finished wedding stuff, and ready to find a job! BUT....I forgot a lot of stuff....and nobody wants to hire someone like me with no experience, and English is my second language....especially in a economy like this. I started studying and feel like I'm slowly getting back what I studied in school. Yet....it's hard to keep the motivation up not knowing if I can find a job ever....

    I am even thinking to give up nursing and work for somewhere else where I could make a use of my first language.
    Yes, I spent a lot of money in nursing school. Yes, I studied so hard that I shed tears so many times. Yes, I have wanted to be a nurse for such a long time. But is there still a chance for me?
    Right now, I don't care where I work, in which field, or how much I get paid. I just wanna get hired! My husband is willing to help me and even told me it's ok to move. (but we bought a house two years ago!)
    Any tips, advices, suggestions, rebukes/ ideas?

    Thank you for reading!
    musu, RN and NJRN33 like this.
  8. 8
    my sister just keep praying every morning, you will definetely get hired. Nothing is imposible with God.
    Gold_SJ, tuahla, NJRN33, and 5 others like this.
  9. 0
    Contact your state's board of nursing & check to see if they'll have any information on refresher courses. Review your materials from school & concentrate on head to toe assessment. Good luck.
  10. 0
    I agree with Koku, as a new grad you will not feel like you know much anyways whether you're away for a year and half or for one week. So if you can afford too, try volunteering at a facility you are interested in working at such as a hospital, clinic or nursing home. Once you are in you will have a better chance of knowing when an RN job is available and if you're already working there they will be more incline to hire you after they see the terrific job you've been doing.
    But if you need a paying position consider looking outside the hospital setting such as community nursing, clinics, assisted living facilities, insurance companies, research. It all depends what you want to do with your nursing career. There's no set rules that say you have to start out in a hospital setting, there's so much more you can do. Brainstorm what it is you want to do and actively go after it by making phone calls, sending emails, writing letters, talking to people etc. Don't be discouraged, the more pro active you become in your job search the better your chances of getting that nursing job.
    Good Luck! Hope this helps.
    Tina
  11. 3
    Wow,
    Your story made me sad, and I feel I have to make a response.
    I am in SF Bay Area in California. The job market here is horrific for new grad nursing students, even experiences nurses are having a hard time to get a job.

    6 months ago, I've heard that one of the new grad training program that offered 15 spots received over 1000 applications. Many of my previous nursing students (as far as 3 years out) are still waiting for their 1st nursing job. The down size here in Bay Area is scary, but I do want to encourage you to keep on trying.

    A few of my former students had some success going out of states, exactly where, I'm not sure, but I do remember that Huston Tx, had many job and training opportunities.

    Also, some of my students (RN, MSN, BSN, ADN, LVN) have challenged the CNA certification (Certified Nurse Assistant), and worked like "Jackie Robinson" and made such an impression to nuse managers that they HAVE to hire them on as staff nurse. I was told that they've showed up early, took on assignments that other CNA's argues about, leaves late, and DON'T gossip. And when they get called into the nurse manager's office with a job offer, many of them cried out of joy.

    The job market is tight, but it is not possible. Continue to study, and take CE classes. ie ECG, ACLS, refresher courses, etc. So, when you go for an interview, you can show the mangers that you have kept up with training, and is up-to-date.

    Good luck,

    Ellen
  12. 0
    I hear your story and I'm afraid it's going to be my own. I graduate in May from college and I'm on a student visa. I'll apply to get the 1 year permit next month and I'm afraid I won't be able to find a job!! I don't know what to do! That will be scary. Let's pray that things will get better by the time I graduate.


Top