This is a VENTING Post! - page 2

Disclaimer: This is a venting post only and may very possibly irk/irritate/anger nursing students. Please don't post about how mean and unfair I am or how I don't understand how difficult it is to be... Read More

  1. by   rpv_rn
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    student nurse checking in on this one...

    this student is an adult. he had the mental capacity and physical ability to meet all the requirements to secure a seat in your program, therefore, he possesses all the necessary skills to meet the requirements for passing skills labs.

    the resources were available for him to practice. he chose not to use them so it was his fault that he was ill prepared for skills. you did not 'chose' to fail him, it was your duty. no slackers in nursing school.

    if you have not already, please speak with him about why he is not applying himself. perhaps there are underlying problems of which you could be of assistance. my prediction is that if this behavior continues, he will not make it past the first semester anyway.
    this has happened more than once:
    student in first semester comes to class unprepared. ask student to demo a "simple" skill and student not able to perform. asked the student in private what is wrong. student starts crying. states he/ she has not read the book at all.
    eventually, student had to be exited. found out later, student met someone and fell in "love" and could not concentrate on program.
    true story. has happened to both of our male / female students.
  2. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from rpv_rn
    this has happened more than once:
    student in first semester comes to class unprepared. ask student to demo a "simple" skill and student not able to perform. asked the student in private what is wrong. student starts crying. states he/ she has not read the book at all.
    eventually, student had to be exited. found out later, student met someone and fell in "love" and could not concentrate on program.
    true story. has happened to both of our male / female students.
    that is a ridiculous answer and that student deserved to be booted out of the program.
  3. by   scribblerpnp
    Unbelievable story! I wonder if he/she still in love with that person and if they think it was worth failing nursing school over now?!
  4. by   rpv_rn
    Quote from scribblerrn
    unbelievable story! i wonder if he/she still in love with that person and if they think it was worth failing nursing school over now?!
    in the case of the student who fell in love & was exited from program, found out that student went into the service.

    the object of student's affection had a better head on his/ her shoulders, diligently studied, is now a 4th semester student & will graduate in dec06.
  5. by   Kelly_the_Great
    Okay, chiming in as a student.

    I'm an older student, work as an LVN, am in a BSN program, commute 1 hour each way, have a family...am I burnin' my candle at both ends? Who isn't?

    Many of my instructors are in the same boat I'm in. They work, they're working on higher education degrees (doctorates), they have families and many have to commute b/c CONs offering doctorate programs aren't just on every street corner, ya know?

    And I have had a couple of instances (one was my Father's death), in which my other obligations interfered with my ability to meet a deadline. BUT, the difference is, I made my instructor aware of the conflict prior to the deadline and arrangements were able to be made.

    It's part of being accountable and conscientious, IMO.

    For instance, the student that doesn't put in the time because, for arguments sake, let's say they didn't have the time d/t work, home, whichever and then they show unprepared when it's time to perform. Are they gonna be the kind of nurse who doesn't hang that IV antbx. for their pt. with sepsis on time because they had a multitude of other things going on with their other pts. instead of going to their charge or their colleagues and asking for help? Oh well, just one way to look at it...don't know if that analogy makes sense or not...:stone

    This is something I would never tell an instructor (at least not while they still had the authority to grade my work) because I wouldn't want to come across as insincere but I think y'all are all saints and mostly have the patience of Job...:bowingpur
  6. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from Halinja
    Thank you!

    As a student I am so frustrated when I work hard, study hard, practice hard, and then someone breezes in that hasn't done the work/study/practice, fumbles around, puts on a sweet smile and trots out an excuse and gets passed on. There should be consequences for not doing the practice. I wouldn't want to be in the hospital and be the patient of someone who somehow got passed through a nursing program on smiles and excuses.

    So...Good Job! (and hopefully he'll try harder next time)
    :yeahthat:
  7. by   scribblerpnp
    Thanks for listening and for those teachers who have "been there, done that," your comments mean a lot.

    The students who have have been commenting, you all sound like the MAJORITY of the students I have (good workers, responsible). I wish you luck and lost of hard work! People like the one I metioned in the OP are few and far between, but they still frustrate me!
  8. by   justjenny
    Quote from scribblerrn
    Disclaimer: This is a venting post only and may very possibly irk/irritate/anger nursing students.
    I am no longer a nursing student - but this in no way angers or upsets me. I think we have all known students at one time or another that seem to think they can "skate through" a program without putting in any actual time and effort.

    I wanted to post to remind any educators reading this thread that they don't always know very much about their students and what they may be going through. I am not suggesting this is the case with your student but let me share the stories of two students I graduated with who are now excellent critical care RNs....

    Female (1) pays attention in class, hands in work on time, in clinicals is quiet and unsure - cannot answer questions "on the spot" regarding patient conditions, etc. Turns out that her husband is in heart failure, she works full time midnights and they are barely able to pay their bills which is a huge worry (how will we afford his meds?) and a significant distractor for her. You would never know she was going through so much - she never complains, never gives excuses.

    Male (2) sleeps during class, does not participate unless required, is late for class, in clinicals is great-answers questions quickly and knows patient conditions, interventions, etc. You might think "he could be a great student if he only applied himself more" but he works 12-24 hr shifts as an EMT (which is why he is quick with answering questions, etc.) he is declaring bankruptcy, only has one vehicle (can't get to class until he takes his wife to work) his teenage daughter was hospitalized for attempting suicide, etc. Again, you would never know this because he doesn't complain or share what he is going through...never whines or complains...is just simply quiet and withdrawn (from exhaustion probably!)

    Some of your worst students may just be people struggling with too much at one time...

    Jenny
  9. by   mamason
    Quote from justjenny
    I am no longer a nursing student - but this in no way angers or upsets me. I think we have all known students at one time or another that seem to think they can "skate through" a program without putting in any actual time and effort.

    I wanted to post to remind any educators reading this thread that they don't always know very much about their students and what they may be going through. I am not suggesting this is the case with your student but let me share the stories of two students I graduated with who are now excellent critical care RNs....

    Female (1) pays attention in class, hands in work on time, in clinicals is quiet and unsure - cannot answer questions "on the spot" regarding patient conditions, etc. Turns out that her husband is in heart failure, she works full time midnights and they are barely able to pay their bills which is a huge worry (how will we afford his meds?) and a significant distractor for her. You would never know she was going through so much - she never complains, never gives excuses.

    Male (2) sleeps during class, does not participate unless required, is late for class, in clinicals is great-answers questions quickly and knows patient conditions, interventions, etc. You might think "he could be a great student if he only applied himself more" but he works 12-24 hr shifts as an EMT (which is why he is quick with answering questions, etc.) he is declaring bankruptcy, only has one vehicle (can't get to class until he takes his wife to work) his teenage daughter was hospitalized for attempting suicide, etc. Again, you would never know this because he doesn't complain or share what he is going through...never whines or complains...is just simply quiet and withdrawn (from exhaustion probably!)

    Some of your worst students may just be people struggling with too much at one time...

    Jenny
    I understand that sometimes life throws really bad things at us. But, what if these individuals were employed as nurses at a facility? Would the facility be willing to excuse poor performance based on problems at home? Just wondering.I know it sounds harsh, but, it is something to think about.I think nursing instructors know this and are doing their best to help prepare students for future employment. I was lucky, when I went to school, there were strict guidelines that had to be followed. If a student was chronically late or unprepared for class/clinicals is was noticed by the instructor. The instructor would then counsel the student on what was expected of them. They did there best to work with the student as much as possible. But, the students were still expected to follow the rules as everyone else.
  10. by   TeachEmNursing
    good for you scribblerrn

    i've had students that have gone through rough times. and i'm glad they felt at ease enough to share that with me. i encourage them the best i can and help them the best i can.

    but that does not negate the fact that they are in nursing school now. they have paid for this education so they might as well try to focus. i would even suggest to students to take an incomplete so that they have time to clear their minds and refocus. but while in school, my job is to teach students and make sure they learn.

    i do not pass students who haven't learned what they were supposed to. think about it, if they were going through different situations, how well are they able to absorb the material? all i can go by is what they do on the unit and in the classroom. they need to have both to pass from me.
  11. by   scaredofshots
    I graduate in 8 months with my RN. I too know students who struggle in class due to work,children or older parents... At our school we are only passed if we have a 75.00 average. (They do not round) and we do not have any other grades averaged in. We are required to pass our clinical calculations test and also have satisfactory performance in clinicals.
    SO if a student really does BAD on test they are never gonna make it.
    On the other hand someone who tests REALLY well and is terrible in everything else they pass! I can not understand how they justify this? Is it all about who will pass the NCLEX and the schools rep???:typing
  12. by   scribblerpnp
    Thanks for the supportive comments. The student passed the skill just fine the second time around.

    Now I have another student who didn't show for an exam nearly a week ago, claiming a family emergency- but came to a class on campus, 25 feet from my office two days following my exam. But didn't bother to stop by- even though I had office hours right after her class let out. I've attempted to contact her several times and she just now left me a message on my work phone. These past few weeks I am feeling like the "difficult" students are attracted to me like a moth to a flame!
  13. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from scribblerrn
    Thanks for the supportive comments. The student passed the skill just fine the second time around.

    Now I have another student who didn't show for an exam nearly a week ago, claiming a family emergency- but came to a class on campus, 25 feet from my office two days following my exam. But didn't bother to stop by- even though I had office hours right after her class let out. I've attempted to contact her several times and she just now left me a message on my work phone. These past few weeks I am feeling like the "difficult" students are attracted to me like a moth to a flame!
    It sounds to me like they are pushing their limits with you...walking the line to see how much they can get away with.

    I would definitely confront this student with this issue, making it clear to her what you expect. In my school, if you can miss only one exam, you must call ahead, and you have to make it up the day you come back.

    I hope things get better for you. Like they say, "A few bad apples can ruin the whole bunch."

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