How much experience makes a good instructor? - page 2

by KayRN910

So, just to pick the brains of a few wise nurses, tell me what you think about this.... I graduated from an ADN program last May. One of my fellow students, while in the nursing program, was taking classes to go towards BSN... Read More


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    I've been a nurse for 16 years, and sometimes I feel like it's not enough experience.

    This girl ( or guy) has one year, one specialty, one hospital (I am assuming) and no med surg?? Considering med surg is a huge part of the AD curriculum, I'd say he/she is not going to meet the qualifications.
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    I started teaching ADN's after about 3 years in a level one specialty ICU and some experience in med/surg. I do just fine teaching my specialty. The NLN (which oversees the school) lets me teach with just my BSN. The only requirement is that I must be enrolled in an MSN program, which I am. There is a monetary fine that can be given to the school if this criteria is not met (which has happened), so I have a program plan on file with the director. There are many factors that go into teaching. Personally, I am a horrible person to do a lecture, but I love the bedside and this is where I like to teach. There are many positions within a program and you never know where someone will fit in.
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    I wouldn't want an instructor or preceptor with so little experience. Of course there are instructors out there witn 20+ years of bedside experience who have no business whatsoever teaching students.
    anggelRN, ktliz, Szasz_is_Right, and 2 others like this.
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    To be honest, Im a student and even though experience is very very important in a preceptor/teacher/instructor, its not everything! A nurse that has 2 years experience,who is enthusiastic, willing to teach, has patience and cares about the student and their feelings (sometimes things can make students more emotional because its all new)and also has confidence in their skills is a much better teacher than a nurse who has 20 years experience but isnt willing to teach and has no patience and gets frustrated by how little some students know in comparison to themselves.

    With that said, the best teacher would have all the qualities of the first nurse i described aswell as having 20 years experience

    As a student, I believe I can learn something from any qualified nurse because I have sooo much to learn
    AmericanRN and GrnTea like this.
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    Hey ya'll. I work in a Pediatric ICU and have 1 year experience and am working on my masters to become a nurse educator. I am just taking classes part time and working full time for my degree. I hope to work as an educator someday and always remain part-time at the bedside. I also work part-time in a nursing home. Do you think that in two years (totaling 3 years of nursing experience) that would be enough to get even a part-time nursing job at a university?

    I currently have my BSN, PALS, ACLS, and CCRN and working on becoming part of the Navy Nurse Corps Reserves. I start in Febuary. Let me know what you all think? I really love the educational field of nursing.
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    I'd want at least 10 years AND his/her ability to know what he/she does NOT know (they don't always go together).
    Nothing worse than an instructor who doesn't know their own intellectual limitations, who is responsible for the transfer of information to others.

    I'd also want an instructor who at least did their BSN at a brick and mortar school. Too many online schools are noted for accepting anyone with a birth certificate and credit card (or money order in a pinch). Part of education is discipline...and that includes the discipline of getting to class. Then the actual experience.....THEN go for the teaching positions for RNs of any sort.

    We don't need more nurses getting out of school having to get the rest of their basic education on the job...

    JMHO


    Edit- and NOW I see that this is an OLD thread.....
    Altra likes this.
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    Quote from NavyNurseGrl
    Hey ya'll. I work in a Pediatric ICU and have 1 year experience and am working on my masters to become a nurse educator. I am just taking classes part time and working full time for my degree. I hope to work as an educator someday and always remain part-time at the bedside. I also work part-time in a nursing home. Do you think that in two years (totaling 3 years of nursing experience) that would be enough to get even a part-time nursing job at a university?

    I currently have my BSN, PALS, ACLS, and CCRN and working on becoming part of the Navy Nurse Corps Reserves. I start in Febuary. Let me know what you all think? I really love the educational field of nursing.
    How did you get the CCRN with one year of experience??

    PALS, and ACLS are obtainable by any level of nurse.

    Personally-NO, I don't see 3 years as having enough experience. Usually by then you're just starting to have the basics down,and the ability to put them all together (ie- the OB patient with DM, and RA, who has a CVA during labor; or the 15 y/o psych patient who is pregnant and has gonorrhea.... they don't all come 'separate' like in school).

    But - it's great that you want to teach- be prepared for sub-par salaries, and being only as "safe" as the biggest idiot you have for a student .... definitely need good instructors.
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    I tend to agree that 3 years is usually not enough. The biggest adjustment in education is that you will have to teach anything they throw at you, including something that may be out of your specialty. Also, you have to remember that a good portion of clinicals are med-surg. I am a peds nurse, but I did my requisite time in med surg early on. While my peds experience has helped (esp since my class rotates thru peds for a few days), there is nothing more valuable than solid med surg floor experience. Variety makes you more well-rounded (and marketable). And it takes time to build your CV.
    Altra and xtxrn like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from nurse educate
    I tend to agree that 3 years is usually not enough. The biggest adjustment in education is that you will have to teach anything they throw at you, including something that may be out of your specialty. Also, you have to remember that a good portion of clinicals are med-surg. I am a peds nurse, but I did my requisite time in med surg early on. While my peds experience has helped (esp since my class rotates thru peds for a few days), there is nothing more valuable than solid med surg floor experience. Variety makes you more well-rounded (and marketable). And it takes time to build your CV.
    Really? A few days?

    I'm not 'dissing' you= but that seems pretty brief.

    I got 1/2 of a semester.
  10. 0
    I started teaching with a little over 3 years of experience. I teach practical/ vocational nursing, which is different than ADNs. I have had no problem teaching the first semester students including clinical. I think one year is a little extreme, but I do not agree with requiring a lot of experience either. If a school requires a lot of experience, they are guaranteeing that only older nurses will teach in their program. I think the schools need younger nurses as well. The minimum in my state is 3 years. Just my


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