ADN wants to teach

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    I am experienced nurse with a AD in nursing. I have been teaching BLS and ACLS for Years and I want to expand my options in teaching. I have ICU experience and also Medical Rehabilitation experience. I have been a preceptor for new and experienced nurses allso. Please donot advise me to get my BSN, I know this would be the best way. I am open to any teaching options. Got any ideas. I looked onto teaching Nursing assistant classes but most want experience in a long term facility and LPNs want you to be a bSN Patient education or staff education. I enjoy teaching especially cardiac but like I said I am open to ideas.
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    Hi--You said yourself you know what the best way is. But you also said what not to tell you....

    So...

    If you want to teach, find out what you need to do to get the proper credentials and then get them. The last time I looked, one needed a masters to teach.

    There's a reason why academics require certain credentials--no one is a "born" teacher, just like no one is a "born" nurse. If you feel the desire to teach, I hope you get the education etc. to allow you to honor that desire.

    Merry Christmas!
  5. 0
    Originally posted by DLHRNUSAF
    I am experienced nurse with a AD in nursing. I have been teaching BLS and ACLS for Years and I want to expand my options in teaching. I have ICU experience and also Medical Rehabilitation experience. I have been a preceptor for new and experienced nurses allso. Please donot advise me to get my BSN, I know this would be the best way. I am open to any teaching options. Got any ideas. I looked onto teaching Nursing assistant classes but most want experience in a long term facility and LPNs want you to be a bSN Patient education or staff education. I enjoy teaching especially cardiac but like I said I am open to ideas.
    Sorry, I can only repeat, or not repeat, what Chris said above. I earned my RN with an AAS from my community college. I wanted to teach so I enrolled in a distance BSPA for nurses with a concentration in education. I thought this would be a good option as I was getting exposed to subjects I would not have had in a traditional BSN program. Whenever I applied for a teaching position in in-service education, I always lost out to a BSN even though my degree was in education. Even after I earned an MSM (Management), I was still not viewed as valuable as a BSN. You must have a BSN to teach in an accredited nursing program and most often an MSN.

    So, the only thing that I can tell you is if you plan to stay in nursing and do not want to be chained to the bedside, you need to XXX.

    Fortunately now I am not doing hospital nursing and teach a variety of courses online. So now, fortunately my non-nursing degrees have paid off. Good luck.
    Ken
    Ken's page
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    DLHRNUSAF -- Wouldn't bother with the BSN. Go straight for the MSN.
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    The BoN in most states will approve an RN with appropriate experience as a Clinical Teaching Assistant - one who instructs students in the clinical area only. There is often a shortage of these sorts of instructors in schools.

    You might consider working in this scenario while you continue with schooling as it will expose you to the realities of busy, underfunded schools of nursing where you will be required to supervise and instruct up to 12 student nurses in the clinical setting. You will also get insights into classroom teaching and other duties associated with an MSN prepared instructor position.

    Incidentally, check out the pay scales for these positions before committing yourself. You might be surprised at how much more clinically active RNs earn (without any further ed.) Preceptor style teaching can be more rewarding than school based teaching.

    The above is just for balance and perspective.
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    I know that I'm not going to say what you'd like me to say, but I'll post anyway. You need advanced degrees to be able to teach. I do agree with the comment earlier that we are not all born teachers. We all have the desire to teach, the passion to pass on what we know and the patience to do so. My master's program gave me more information and clinical experience to be able to become a content expert. Having a clinical masters degree opens the door for you to teach clinicals in your specialty area. My doctoral program taught me many, many lessons that I probably didn't want to learn, but looking back, I'm glad that I did. I learned how to make the most of my time, and work smarter, not harder. I met other students literally from all over the US and the world and learned as much from them during discussions as I did from the teacher. I also took courses that gave me alot of insight into higher education that have proven valuable to me today, including Law and Higher Education, Program Evaluation and Curriculum Development. I had been teaching with a MSN for 5 years before entering the doctoral program, and thought that I knew alot, but I was able to use what I knew and build upon it.

    Don't be afraid of more education. It opens plenty of doors for you and no one can take it away from you.
    STG
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    DLHRNUSAF

    You may be able to teach as an adjunct clinical instructor at a community college. I did that as an ADN in Maternal/Child Health, teaching clinicals to first year ADN students. As someone else said, the need for clinical instructor at this time is great; that is why I was able to take advantage of this opportunity. Also, I know an ADN who teaches in a CNA program at the high school level; no weekends, holidays and summers off! That may not be the challenge you are seeking, but an oppotunity to teach with an ADN, nonetheless. The opportunities are more limited, of course, but they are out there! Good luck!


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