What other types of jobs options can I explore besides floor nursing?

  1. 0
    Hi,

    I have a BSN in nursing however limit experience. What other types of jobs options can I explore besides floor nursing?

    I recently just started on a med surg floor and its not for me I feel terrible saying that it.



    Any suggestions?
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I started in med/surge because it was the only job I could get even though I knew I didn't want to work there. 11 months later I was able to get a job in public health. I've been here about 10 months and I love it!
  4. 0
    Maybe if you described some jobs or duties you have previously enjoyed, that would guide responders toward suggesting possible career paths?

    I always love to suggest clinical research nursing for those who want great work hours (usually 9-5ish hours), a courteous, professional atmosphere, and relatively predictable duties. Beware, however, if you do not like computer/paperwork, this may not be for you :-) Best of luck to you--- there are SO many other options for you, and there is NO reason to feel guilty about not liking floor nursing! You'll find a good fit if you keep looking.
  5. 1
    Sorry, but I don't think the OP has had sufficient exposure to the working environment to make a generalization about "floor nursing". It takes 6-12 months to actually become comfortable/competent as a novice nurse. Please listen to the advice of veteran nurses - we have all been there and one that. Lack of acute care experience/expertise will be a serious deterrent to career advancement in nursing.
    elkpark likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from HouTx
    Sorry, but I don't think the OP has had sufficient exposure to the working environment to make a generalization about "floor nursing". It takes 6-12 months to actually become comfortable/competent as a novice nurse. Please listen to the advice of veteran nurses - we have all been there and one that. Lack of acute care experience/expertise will be a serious deterrent to career advancement in nursing.
    I don't think the OP is making a generalization about floor nursing. She said it wasn't for her not that it was a horrible job. And if she doesn't like floor nursing and doesn't want to be a floor nurse then not having acute care experience most likely won't be a problem. And if it is there are refresher courses.

    We don't say the same thing about adult nurses who swear up and down they would never want to do peds. Why do we hold none acute care nurses to some higher standard?
  7. 0
    I have a similar query. I am a new(ish) grad on her 3rd career and working in a very busy ED. I love what I do and I love the ED -- it was the ONLY place I ever wanted to work. Unfortunately I can absolutely see a point down the road (3-5 years out maybe) when I'm going to hit my tolerance and head into burnout. I too am trying to feel out my options for where I can go next. I get the idea that a BSN is a must, but that will be my 3rd higher ed degree and I can't stomach the idea of going back to school just yet.

    I'm thinking clinical research might be a path for me because I love the academic milieu but I don't think nursing education is quite the direction I want. I was also thinking about UR or nurse navigator but those seem to want more/different experience than I have. Anyone in those fields want to chime in?

    (The details: I'm a 32 yr. old ASN nurse with a background in medical billing and ISO certification before I returned to school for nursing)
  8. 0
    I also had the same question as you when I graduated. I preferred public health and was not looking forward to working on the floor but was advised to start at a hospital. I'm not sure what you want to do with your career but in my situation, I needed at least a year of acute care experience to even be considered for jobs I wanted outside the hospital, which I believe is sound advice since it'll guarantee employers I actually learned the skills and can apply them out on the field. It might be difficult right now, but I think you should stick it out for a year and get your year experience. Plus, it doesn't look good to employers if you don't put in enough time, they'll think you'll quit on them too. In the meantime, think about what you want to do with your career. Look back at your clinicals and remember which rotations you've enjoyed or think about you are passionate about life. In my case, I love volunteering and working with the community and think public health is perfect for that.
  9. 0
    I have a masters in Global-Public Health but have had a substantial hiatus due to family and now am finding it near impossible to secure a job. i've been thinking about Public health nursing or nurse midwifery. What is it like trying to get a job in these areas? Where are the jobs? What specifically are they looking for in terms of training and experience? How much do they pay?


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