This might cost me my internship!

  1. I am so mad at myself. I just got home from a wonderful interview. I mean, it was a dream come true, with a very nice nurse manager who took her time to show me around and answer all of my questions. I hurry home to write her a "thank you" letter and send it off before the mailman comes, and in all that hurry I do something so stupid. I forgot to sign the letter!!!!:selfbonk: I could not believe it. I typed my name at the very bottom and left the space above for the signature, and I forgot to sign it!!! And I remembered after I gave it to the mailman. I just messed up my chance to get this dream internship.
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   Freedom42
    Suggestion: Quickly write up -- by hand, no typing -- a short note, humorous note explaining your gaff and reiterating how much you enjoyed your meeting. Any good manager knows that we all make mistakes, and a handwritten note is always appreciated by a person in a hiring position. I know in my previous career, I always remembered who sent the short, friendly thank-you in their own script. It's genuine. If you do that, I'm sure he or she will understand, and you won't jeopardize your internship.
  4. by   onduty23
    i dont get why missing a signature would cause you a position
  5. by   NurseLatteDNP
    Freedom42, thank you very much for your suggestion. I was thinking either that or maybe sending her an e-mail, because she gave me her personal e-mail adress.
    onduty23-I know forgetting the signature does not seem like a big deal, but it is so competitive for new graduates in Dallas, that even a small mistake can cost you a job. I bet she has interviewed many more people and there are only 2 positions available. I just wanted to make a great impression.
  6. by   Freedom42
    I agree with the previous poster: Even in this competitive arena, I doubt a small mistake like that would cost a good candidate an internship. But taking that extra step will help you sleep at night.

    One suggestion: Send a handwritten note, not an e-mail. It shows you make the extra effort, and you'll stand apart from the other applicants. Every business etiquette book recommends a personal note instead of something typed or e-mailed.

    I've interviewed dozens of job candidates over the years. It's the ones who really take the interview process seriously -- well-dressed, polite, a little early, a copy of resume in hand -- who always stands out. I know these things sound obvious, but they're not to many people. I had a student at an Ivy League school send me a generic cover letter with a fluorescent Post-It bearing my name. I sent it right back to her with another Post-It on it that said, "You've got to be kidding me." She stood out for all the wrong reasons.
  7. by   NurseLatteDNP
    Quote from Freedom42
    I agree with the previous poster: Even in this competitive arena, I doubt a small mistake like that would cost a good candidate an internship. But taking that extra step will help you sleep at night.

    One suggestion: Send a handwritten note, not an e-mail. It shows you make the extra effort, and you'll stand apart from the other applicants. Every business etiquette book recommends a personal note instead of something typed or e-mailed.

    I've interviewed dozens of job candidates over the years. It's the ones who really take the interview process seriously -- well-dressed, polite, a little early, a copy of resume in hand -- who always stands out. I know these things sound obvious, but they're not to many people. I had a student at an Ivy League school send me a generic cover letter with a fluorescent Post-It bearing my name. I sent it right back to her with another Post-It on it that said, "You've got to be kidding me." She stood out for all the wrong reasons.
    Thank you so much (again). That did make me feel a lot better.
  8. by   I_am_Julia
    don't you think that was just as tacky as the post it note? you should have taken the high road and just filed the resume. plus, it's against hr laws. hummm...

    Quote from freedom42
    i had a student at an ivy league school send me a generic cover letter with a fluorescent post-it bearing my name. i sent it right back to her with another post-it on it that said, "you've got to be kidding me." she stood out for all the wrong reasons.
  9. by   Freedom42
    No, I don't think it was tacky at all. I wanted the student to get the point. She would never get a job by sending out cover letters like that.

    Just curious: What HR law is violated by responding to a letter that comes in an envelope addressed to me?
  10. by   I_am_Julia
    if the letter is written to you and you are the representative for the company, then there are several laws that you violated. it was not professional at all.

    if you were a mentor of the sorts and it was sent to you for evaluation, then that's one thing but it doesn't seem to be the case here. it was just poor taste. (if it was really done).

    Quote from freedom42
    no, i don't think it was tacky at all. i wanted the student to get the point. she would never get a job by sending out cover letters like that.

    just curious: what hr law is violated by responding to a letter that comes in an envelope addressed to me?
  11. by   Freedom42
    I'm sorry if it offends your taste. But what law(s) were violated? I would like to know what was illegal.

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