Should I quit my job?

  1. 0
    THE QUESTION IS: WHEN IS IT "TIME"?

    I know a lot of you will think this is ludicrous judging by my age, but I feel as if i need some serious advice about this. I'll give you guys the story in a nutshell.. i graduated last may of 2003 with a business degree. Because of the recent economy, I was job searching for about a good 8 months until i landed at the ad agency where i am at today (got the job january 2004). I interned at a lot of ad agencies in college and swore it was what i wanted to do (at least throughout my 20s). however, i had much of an "epiphany" the week before i got my job at the agency-- it was to be a nurse. i thought that maybe all my months of unemployment were just speaking to me, especially after hearing about the shortage in nurses. as the weeks progressed, i still couldnt stop thinking about it, even after i had started my new job and was going through the motions. I like everyone at work and the work that i do for the company is fine. its entry level, so i expect not to make many critical decisions.. but i guess i never saw myself in an upper level position and i'm starting to realize that chasing the almighty dollar isnt what makes me happy- in sum, i dont think i have a future in this

    i have decided to take it slow and make a rational decision before anything.. i've signed up to volunteer at a local hospital and have decided to take 1 pre-req class at a local community college. if i do leave, it will be right before may (when summer school starts for colleges, so i can start prereqs), which would only make my "business career" 4 months...

    the big question:

    is it too early for me to leave this job for nursing? i know this message board is a little bit biased, but I really do feel as if this is a "calling" and not just a phase. i am young (22) and i can make a lot of changes still, but people are telling me that i owe it to myself to stick around at this job because all those months of being unemployed.. but in contrast to that- i think to myself "why should i keep on lying to myself? i know i'm not going to be here in the long run, so why should i appeal to what everyone 'suggests' that i do?"

    WELL, SHOULD I?
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  4. 10 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Quote from chuckcamp
    THE QUESTION IS: WHEN IS IT "TIME"?

    I know a lot of you will think this is ludicrous judging by my age, but I feel as if i need some serious advice about this. I'll give you guys the story in a nutshell.. i graduated last may of 2003 with a business degree. Because of the recent economy, I was job searching for about a good 8 months until i landed at the ad agency where i am at today (got the job january 2004). I interned at a lot of ad agencies in college and swore it was what i wanted to do (at least throughout my 20s). however, i had much of an "epiphany" the week before i got my job at the agency-- it was to be a nurse. i thought that maybe all my months of unemployment were just speaking to me, especially after hearing about the shortage in nurses. as the weeks progressed, i still couldnt stop thinking about it, even after i had started my new job and was going through the motions. I like everyone at work and the work that i do for the company is fine. its entry level, so i expect not to make many critical decisions.. but i guess i never saw myself in an upper level position and i'm starting to realize that chasing the almighty dollar isnt what makes me happy- in sum, i dont think i have a future in this

    i have decided to take it slow and make a rational decision before anything.. i've signed up to volunteer at a local hospital and have decided to take 1 pre-req class at a local community college. if i do leave, it will be right before may (when summer school starts for colleges, so i can start prereqs), which would only make my "business career" 4 months...

    the big question:

    is it too early for me to leave this job for nursing? i know this message board is a little bit biased, but I really do feel as if this is a "calling" and not just a phase. i am young (22) and i can make a lot of changes still, but people are telling me that i owe it to myself to stick around at this job because all those months of being unemployed.. but in contrast to that- i think to myself "why should i keep on lying to myself? i know i'm not going to be here in the long run, so why should i appeal to what everyone 'suggests' that i do?"

    WELL, SHOULD I?


    someone? anyone? please? help?
  6. 0
    Okay - here goes. I think that yes, at 22 there is room for change. During your 20's (IMHO, of course), change is good. Nursing is a very responsible career where dealing with people and raw emotion can be challenging. I think volunteering at a hospital is a very good start. Then, talk to some nurses in your family. You might also talk with a school of nursing. Quite often, they will offer career days where you can shadow a nurse for a few hours to get a better feel for things. I wish you well. We sure need some more nurses....
  7. 0
    chuckcamp:

    - I too faced the career change dilemna you speak about.

    - First, you need to make sure your finances are in order. After a layoff, I would
    think there would be some serious bills to pay.

    - Second, it's very possible to do pre-reqs and work at same time. I did A&P 101 & A&P 102, and am doing Microbiology now - while holding down a full-time software engineering job and a 2 night/week teaching job.

    - Four months to make a decision such as this seems a bit hasty.

    - I started my queries into nursing back in 1999. Spent the next 4 yrs making up my
    mind if this was really what I wanted to do. Got my finances & mental state in
    order. Now am wrapping up pre-reqs and will start actual clinicals in June.

    - Yeah, it'll be a long haul -- but I don't care. It's something that I want to do.
    And, weird as it seems, I actually look forward to hitting the books. Means I am
    that much closer to my dream of getting out of this cubicle.

    John Coxey
  8. 0
    I agree with John (hi, John!). Take some pre-requ's while you work - that's what I'm doing. I'm taking Chem right now (& I have an A! Thanks for the tips, John, they work) and will take A&P I this summer, then submit my app. While waiting for my acceptance, I will take A&P II in the fall and then actually quit Jan. 1. Yes, it's practically a year away and sometimes (many) I want to scream at work because I'm so tired of it and so ready to dive into nursing. BUT I am stashing $$$ like crazy this year and that's my plan. I want to be accepted before I quit and play it super-safe. I have a full-time systems analyst job AND 2 kids so if I can swing one class, I imagine you can swing 2 (assuming you are childless). How you feel about doing school again and the subject matter will tell you a lot. Plus the atmosphere you'll soak up at the hospital. These are all good learnings and you should approach this as a research project -- the stakes are pretty high. My advice is take your time and do at least one semester of pre-requs while you work.
    Meredith
  9. 0
    Meridith & Others:

    - I thought I was the only one who screamed at work!!!!

    - My plans are to continue working while attending nursing school. After
    this semester, I only need to get the actual nursing classes out of the
    way.

    - However, been giving some serious thought to this, and am thinking of
    possible quitting work next year -- once I am half-way through the
    nursing program.

    - Not sure how hard it will be to get an ICU position right out of school, so
    am figuring I might just spend my last 2 yrs in the hospital. Even if I am
    just a gopher ("Gopher this and Gopher that"). At least I can put some
    hospital related experience on the resume.

    Also, am loosing my sanity in this place. Much the same as ChuckCamp
    is going through with his job.

    However, I do need the $$, so am stuck in this dumpster I call a cubicle
    for another year or so.

    Gotta run,

    John Coxey
    Evansville (don't ask), Indiana, USA
  10. 0
    The one thing not being mentioned is the LVN programs. In Texas most are a year long. 12 solid months. But you usually start clinicals with in the first 6 weeks so you know real fast if this is for you. As an LVN who will graduate ADN in May this was the best choice for me. I have worked all through the ADN program. Plus you should have courses that will transfer to your prereq. Good Luck with what ever you decide.
  11. 0
    unlike most of you people who posted replys, i dont have any dependents to worry about and my job doesnt pay that great.. granted, it is a starting point, its not like i'm sacrificing a high paying job... in fact, i work in nyc and live with relatives in jersey because of rent issues.. and the tuition for school wouldnt be a factor. both my parents are in the medical field and have always wanted me to go.. i think they'd be happy to finance what they've always dreamed of.

    in sum, i've got nothing to lose (except for an entry level job) and all to gain from this... the only gamble is doing well in prereqs.. but, unlike when i was 18, i feel a little more determined with school because i'm not just "going through the motions" of school...

    even with these arguments, should i?
  12. 0
    sounds like you have a good plan about taking one class first. I would also contact a local hospital and job shadow on a couple of your days off, so you can see what it is really like working as a nurse. it doesnt sound like it, but make sure that you are not going into nursing just because there are jobs and money.. that needs to be way down on the list of why one enters nursing. best of luck to ya!
  13. 0
    Good luck!


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