Rn Failure! - page 2

I WAS in a nursing program until I failed out recently. Tomorrow everyone goes back to class and I'm feeling... crappy! I never thought it could happen to me. Now, I'm really scared to go back... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    It's a tough blow, and I can understand why you're feeling down on yourself. Allow yourself to be disappointed and feel that, but be careful not to use words like "I'm a failure".

    You are not a failure. You failed a course, there's a big difference. Be kind is how you process this.

    Then, if you're up for the challenge, and really really want to do it. Get back in the game. Take a good hard look at the reasons why you didn't pass the course. Write them all down in one column. And in the next column write down how you intend to do better. Make appointments with instructors, or call them if you don't understand why you didn't pass, and ask them to help you. Next time do you need to join a study group, or do you need to drop a study group that wasn't effective. Take a look at your study habits, asking yourself why with more effort did I not get results, etc. etc. etc.

    When there's a will there's a way. With motivation, determination, forgiveness of self, you'll go all the way next time!

    Best of luck to you.
  2. by   BETSRN
    Quote from cheerfuldoer
    They want nurses to look OUTSIDE the box....so to speak.
    That is so important. Too bad so many experienced nurses cannot think outside the box. I think some of that is due to laziness and the victim mentality.
  3. by   BETSRN
    Quote from pattycake1
    Hello, I'm new to this site but I had to get my 2 cents worth in. I have gone thru 3 semesters full time only to have each instructor do the same thing as yours. Shoot me down in clinical, especially in pre and post comference. I knew I was just as good as some of the bad students but they made me feel stupid. (I made the mistake of telling them I have Adult Attention Deficit Disorder). Two of them got together and told me "not everyone is cut out for nursing and maybe you might think about doing something else" Talk about feeling low! But I was determined and when I was forced to leave the class (even though I had a B every semester, I went into p/t class and was going to work at the hospital I was doing clinical in, which was my instructors suggestion to go p/t and get a p/t job there) she gave me such a bad evaluation the hospital couldn't hire me!! I am in my last semester, have a wonderful teacher that says "everyone in my class in going to pass!!!" So don't let ANY INSTRUCTORS kill your dream. Go back and dig in again. Pray for financial help and you can do it!!! GOD IS GOOD!
    Just remember, clinical instructors are not always the nicest or happiest of people, either. I think most programs have at least one of those people. Keep on truckin'.
  4. by   peaceful
    I know of 4 of my previous classmates that failed a class and came back and took class over and all 4 are now RNs working in the field. Its like one poster said previously "how bad do you want it?" You gotta go in fighting, figure out the best way to study, ask teachers, ask RN's, make a game plan, what works for you, study guides, flash cards, rewriting lecture notes, taping lectures and relistening later, reading "made easy" books along with textbooks. You need to find your groove and LEARN the game of studying. You can do this, your failing previously was only a temporary setback.
  5. by   wv_nurse 2003
    Look into taking a "Test Taking" course. Learning to test well can be invaluable when trying to master nursing exams. Do a web search, and read as much as you can on successful test taking!

    http://library.austincc.edu/help/testtake/
  6. by   kenni
    try an LVN program first. many hospitals offer their own. once you have the experience of nursing the education will come alot easier. and my school stresses this one: find an EFFECTIVE study group! get with other students who are doing well and want to continue doing well. ask for help on those topics you just can't seem to grasp. and obviously, don't wait til the end of the semester, if your current study patterns or study group is not working CHANGE FAST!
  7. by   midnightRN
    Quote from Madrn2b
    I WAS in a nursing program until I failed out recently. Tomorrow everyone goes back to class and I'm feeling... crappy!
    I never thought it could happen to me. Now, I'm really scared to go back because I know that this past semester... I studied my "behind" off but I just could not answer the questions like the professors wanted. I guess I need to be a more critical thinker but.... now my self esteem is shot. Ok, so I'm not looking for a pity party....just some advice on how I might overcome all this.
    There has been a ton of great advice already, so I'll just add a couple things that I didn't see. Maybe it'll work for you too.
    I studied with an NCLEX review book. For example, when reviewing fluid and electrolytes, I used the example questions to see if I really got the material. It also gives you practice in anwering the types of questions (modeled after the NCLEX itself) the instructors tend to ask.
    Next, when you're getting most of the questions either in your text book or review book correct, have faith in yourself...that that knowledge is there...you know it. Read each question twice, before looking at the answers, to discover what the question is really asking. Then answer it , and don't change it.
    Nursing school it really tough in a way that cannot be explained to those who have not gotten through it. Know that you are not alone. I have some very good friends who did not graduate with me, but all of them say after the initial shock, it wasn't that bad. They were more comfortable studying and in class, because they were already familiar with the material. Hope this helps, and best wishes to you.
  8. by   dazzle256
    Quote from Madrn2b
    Thanks.... I know I'm beating myself up about it. But you know.... when you don't do well on a test.... you study harder and you bring your grade up. I could never bring my grade up. It was bewildering! I felt so helpless. Like... I couldn't help myself! And now.... I feel like one big SAP and that I might loose it if someone looked at me wrong.
    My husband is very supportive. But I don't think that anyone can really understand unless they've gone through a program such as nursing. DO you agree?
    Some people are just not good test takers. It doesn't mean you aren't smart or you didn't study........maybe some help with test taking skills.

    Good Luck to you.
  9. by   1RNTutor
    Hello Madrn2b -

    I deal with at least 2-4 students each semester who have had your experience. You have already received a lot of advice and I think you'll find it all tremendously supportive. It's important to approach this as a learning opportunity, nothing less, nothing more. It is only a pothole in what is always a difficult road.

    If your program is like many you can apply for readmission so it is essential that you take care of a few things now. First, do not feel you need to tell everyone you failed. Something has interrupted your process and that's a different matter entirely. If anyone asks, "you are on leave" or taking a semester off. Get past thinking of yourself as failing and give yourself some room to breathe. Apply the steps of the nursing process to this problem: assess your options, analyse and diagnose, visualize goals, describe outcomes, develop interventions, intermittently evaluate your progress.

    Find out what you must do to re-enter your program. Go back and talk to the faculty member(s)/ student affairs staff you felt understood you best. Get input.Find out what a successful applicant for readmission must present for consideration. Look at other programs also; ask your supportive faculty if they will support your application.

    Not to scare you but get a medical check-up. You are probably completely fatigued, poorly nourished and not sleeping well. Make sure to rule out any condition that may have interfered with clear thinking including depression. If you do have a chronic illness it may be discovered and treated. The stress of nursing school alone is enough to activate acute and chronic illness that was not obvious clinically at the start. This includes thyroid, cardiac, diabetes, chronic fatigue syndrome and chronic low-level viral illnessess (like that from Epstein Barr) as well as auto-immune diseases, even cancer.

    If other circumstances were involved - illness, family emergencies, having to work, etc - make a plan with those involved to resolve those issues and write it down. Then begin to implement the plan keeping in mind that when you return, the nursing program will want assurances that the problems/other responsibilities you have will not create difficulty for you. Hold family members and employers to the agreement, especially when you return.

    Most programs ask you to sit out a semester before reapplication. If you do not already work in a clinical setting, preferably as a nursing assistant, try to find a full-time job like that for the interim to give you greater clinical exposure. Ask nurses in your work area, even if it's just a medical office, to explain what and why they are doing what they do. Take every training course available at your facility and get completion certificates for each. Maximize your support resources (at work, and here) outside of your nursing program.

    Continuing education articles with self-evaluation quizzes are available in RN and AJN magazines and many others, including online. Try to schedule and complete several CE each week. If you can afford it, take them for the certificates you receive for successful completion. If you can't afford the cost, photocopy the courses and the self-evaluation quizzes(usually 3-8 pp). Make up a readmission packet with copies of your training certificates from work and CE certificates/ CE courses with completed quizzes. This packet is evidence of your continuing commitment to learning as well as a track record of what you have reviewed.

    Prepare to go back. Get an NCLEX-RN prep book that you feel is easy to use and to read but check that it has outline guides for topic areas (as other posts have stated); every student is different and no guide is perfect for everyone. Use that book's outlines as you work through the CE articles and quizzes. Every few weeks, when you are feeling rested, attempt some of the questions. Review the rationales carefully.

    Keep a sense of purpose and focus. You can do this. You were not admitted to your program by mistake. This is a situation you can turn into a positive experience. You will care for patients who have had the world turned upside down, who will have lost abilities and faith in themselves. You will be able to offer something very special to those patients, a particular sense of understanding that comes only from having had hopes denied. Overcoming this tremendous disappointment will enable you to speak with authenicity in helping your patients back to a state of wellness.

    The Chinese character or symbol for 'crisis' is made up of two separate characters: one represents 'danger', the other represents 'opportunity'.
    You will succeed if that is your wish. In the meantime be gentle with yourself and look for the opportunity to learn, especially about yourself, and you will find that special way of thinking developing through your approach to this situation.

    Believe me. I congratulate 2-4 graduating students every semester on this achievement - S.L.

    QUOTE=Madrn2b]I WAS in a nursing program until I failed out recently. Tomorrow everyone goes back to class and I'm feeling... crappy!
    I never thought it could happen to me. Now, I'm really scared to go back because I know that this past semester... I studied my "behind" off but I just could not answer the questions like the professors wanted. I guess I need to be a more critical thinker but.... now my self esteem is shot. Ok, so I'm not looking for a pity party....just some advice on how I might overcome all this. [/QUOTE]
    Last edit by 1RNTutor on Jan 23, '05
  10. by   stbernardclub
    I would give it another try ifI were you !
  11. by   lindymarie
    Tutor,

    I know your post was meant to help dazzle. It was perhaps one of the most wonderful posts I have ever read. I have printed a copy and placing it on the front of my refrigerator. I plan to use your valuable information for my own endeavors. Thank you so much for your information.

    Linda
  12. by   peaceful
    Excellent advice! Thanks for looking at the whole picture.

    Quote from lindymarie
    Tutor,

    I know your post was meant to help dazzle. It was perhaps one of the most wonderful posts I have ever read. I have printed a copy and placing it on the front of my refrigerator. I plan to use your valuable information for my own endeavors. Thank you so much for your information.

    Linda
  13. by   WhatToDo
    I'm getting ready to start a BSN program this summer, so I'm not really sure I should post, but I have always done really well in school and have been both a student and a instructor in public health.

    When I was in graduate school, I cried a lot. I think the crying really helps get the stress and worry of not getting it all done out so you can focus. Many of the girls in my graduate program cried a lot too. When you have to stay up late, get up early, not eat, not shower and not do anything fun for weeks at a time, life really sucks. But it is all worth it in the end.

    I also find that visiting your professors often makes a huge difference when you're not doing well. When I had students come visit me and be respectful to me (you'd be surprised how students can really treat you like crap) I really felt the need to help them and it makes a difference in the end with grades.

close