Quitting before orientation

  1. Hello nurses! I'm a new grad and I really need advice here: I accepted a per diem job 2 months ago, but I have yet to start orientation. I did not sign any job offer letter, but I already completed a background check. I just assumed I'll sign one during orientation or something. Anyway, the background check took a while - about 4 weeks. During that waiting period, I went to an interview at a hospital and they offered me a full-time position 2 and a half weeks later. I accepted it because I need a full-time job with a regular schedule and it is much closer to where I live. The per diem job is at a sub-acute rehab and is 17 miles away from home. The reason why I initially accepted it was because I really needed a job back then and I wasn't sure if any of the places I applied to would ask me for an interview. The hospital job called me much later, but I am choosing it since it is much more practical for my situation right now.

    My orientation in that per diem job is next week and as much as I want to keep it, I want to focus at only one job at a time. I just feel kinda guilty and bad since they already did a background check on me and everything and they were nice people. I'm thinking of sending them a long-ass email to inform them that I'm rescinding my application, declining the offer, and that I'm not attending the orientation. Or, should I go to the orientation and speak to the supervisor or manager. Is it appropriate to mention that I accepted another offer or can I be vague and just say "due to personal reasons...." in either my letter or meeting?

    Thank you! Any advice will be appreciated!
    Last edit by littlemissBSN on Oct 20
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   TriciaJ
    I'd be honest with the per diem people. Tell them you accepted the per diem position hoping it would turn to full time because you really need the work. Meanwhile, you've been offered a full time position elsewhere so you accepted this. Because you want to focus on one job at a time, you are withdrawing your application.

    Then you say something about how nice they've been, that you'd been looking forward to working for them but cannot turn down a full time job offer.

    They will understand. They know you are a new grad; it's probably safe to assume you don't have any other source of support and all they can offer you is per diem, so of course they will lose you to someone who can offer you full time.

    Don't sweat this. Just be polite and respectful and congratulations on your upcoming new job.
  4. by   littlemissBSN
    Quote from TriciaJ
    I'd be honest with the per diem people. Tell them you accepted the per diem position hoping it would turn to full time because you really need the work. Meanwhile, you've been offered a full time position elsewhere so you accepted this. Because you want to focus on one job at a time, you are withdrawing your application.

    Then you say something about how nice they've been, that you'd been looking forward to working for them but cannot turn down a full time job offer.

    They will understand. They know you are a new grad; it's probably safe to assume you don't have any other source of support and all they can offer you is per diem, so of course they will lose you to someone who can offer you full time.

    Don't sweat this. Just be polite and respectful and congratulations on your upcoming new job.
    Thank you! That does sound like a proper way to go about it. I will surely include how much I appreciate them for giving me an opportunity to work with them.
    Last edit by littlemissBSN on Oct 21
  5. by   Orion81
    Quote from littlemissBSN
    Thank you! That does sound like a proper way to go about it. I will surely include how much I appreciate them for giving me an opportunity to work with them.
    Yep, and the way she worded it was short, professional and to the point. You don't want to ramble away writing some loooong email like you mentioned. Congrats on the job offer!
  6. by   littlemissBSN
    Quote from Orion81
    Yep, and the way she worded it was short, professional and to the point. You don't want to ramble away writing some loooong email like you mentioned. Congrats on the job offer!
    Thank you!
  7. by   ProperlySeasoned
    Good for you for realizing that as a new grab, focusing on one job at a time is crucial. Best of luck to you.
  8. by   Wolf at the Door
    I would keep both because you never know how job B is going to actually turn out. If you don't like it at least you already have your foot in the door.
  9. by   littlemissBSN
    I sent them the email and worded it concisely and respectfully. Thank you everyone for your help!

    By the way, in background checks, will my current employer have any way to know about it if I have not mentioned it?

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