Male Chiropractor considering nursing...advice please :)

  1. 0
    Hello All,
    I am a 31 year old Chiropractor looking into nursing as a possibility. I'm researching going to an accelerated 1 year BSN program for 2nd degree non-nursing majors. I have all pre-reqs from prior education. I'm also looking at PA programs that are at a minimum 2 years, some 2.5 to 3. I would also have to move for the PA programs, since only ones in my area are 3-4 years. My ultimate goal would be to get NP while working as an RN. Maybe CRNA, if I go the nursing route.

    I guess my question relates to the better option for a male with a Chiropractor degree. I hear NP would give me more independence, but PA would give me more ability to switch specialties. And some tell me, that their really isn't much a difference at all.

    Certainly, money is some what of an issue, since I already have a ton of loans with Chiro degree. I've also looking into going back for DO, but honestly don't really want to put the time and money into that. I really just like helping people and not in it for titles and money....although I do have lot of loans to pay back. Anyways, I would really love to hear from some nurses out there, especially men out there(not many I know). Anyone know any Chiro's that have gone this route? Any thoughts is much appreciated. Thanks so much.
    D
  2. 74 Comments so far...

  3. 2
    If I were in your shoes, at your tender age and with your loans, I'd go for DO.
    mmc51264 and S.N. Visit like this.
  4. 0
    two terms come to mind that need to be considered, “opportunity cost” and “return on investment” (r.o.i.) both are investment terminology.

    for example, to get crna would personally put me in the hole 500k. how?, two years of lost income, and continuing expenses, (i.e. mortgages, insurance, taxes, tuition, groceries etc). here’s a homework assignment for you, i’m a va nurse ii, step 9, specialty differential, miami florida locality pay. look up my pay scale its public information, go to (opm.gov).

    upside, a bedside icu rn is highly employable; it’s a matter of deciding where you want to work. that’s power, particularly for a once starving airline refugee like me.
  5. 0
    IMHO, the only reason to go the PA route is if you were going to go into ortho or cardio-thoracic surgery. The later being the good route. Other than getting your hands "in there", I would not be able to wrap my brain around the profession. What would there be to do with a PA other than surgery, seriously? I could not just do what amounts to MA work or admin work for an MD which, unfortunately ends up being what a lot of PAs are used for. This after shelling out more $$. Also in some specialties, especially ER, MDs and PAs butt heads.

    NP? I agree, sort of a spastic jump. The DO route, have you looked into that one?
  6. 5
    Chiropractor: Why would you throw your chiropractic education away? You say you want to "help people." Aren't you doing that now? You'll be nearing 40 years old and paying mounds of debts. If you want to punish yourself financially, DO is the logical leap. Anything else would be a sideways step into a position with less autonomy and control over working hours, etc.
    Nola009, EMEddie, DizzyLizzyNurse, and 2 others like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from subee
    Chiropractor: Why would you throw your chiropractic education away?
    How many times have you been to a Chiropractor?

    How many choices would you have if you did need one?
  8. 0
    Are you not that satisfied with being a chiro? If you are, but just looking for a challenge, why not do a fellowship to gain more knowledge, challenging scope of practice. Have you heard of the Gray institute, Gary Gray? Less $$ then going for your NP or PA, you're still be helping people move & feel better but a much better understanding of functional movement/human body.
    NP or PA is great, but a side step for you, with more responsibilities, less flexibility and possibly less money overall depending on where you work. Good luck!!
  9. 0
    Quote from Flying ICU RN
    How many times have you been to a Chiropractor?

    How many choices would you have if you did need one?
    I'm not sure what you saying here. I've been to a chiropractor many times and find it as useful as physical therapy or accupuncture. Everything works great for 24 hours. But I had to go to a chiropractor to get an education about taking care of my neck pain long term - things to do and not do, etc. Generally, the other specialities aren't interested in teaching you how to live with chronic pain. If you're insinuating that there's more competition among chiropractors, the good ones (that actually get a referral from a surgeon!) are few and far between and booked.
  10. 0
    Quote from subee
    I'm not sure what you saying here. I've been to a chiropractor many times and find it as useful as physical therapy or accupuncture. Everything works great for 24 hours. But I had to go to a chiropractor to get an education about taking care of my neck pain long term - things to do and not do, etc. Generally, the other specialities aren't interested in teaching you how to live with chronic pain. If you're insinuating that there's more competition among chiropractors, the good ones (that actually get a referral from a surgeon!) are few and far between and booked.
    Perhaps I should have been a little less "cryptic" in my post.

    While the employment / job outlook for Chiropractors is expected to grow along with healthcare in general (a rising tide floats all boats), their revenue is directly proportional to the patients ability to pay. Many plans do not cover the service.

    The entrepreneurial nature of the business is more critical to success than clinical ability.
  11. 5

    "I would really love to hear from some nurses out there, especially men out there(not many I know). Anyone know any Chiro's that have gone this route? Any thoughts is much appreciated. Thanks so much."

    I'm a chiropractor myself, been one for 14 years, been an RN for 5. Right now I'm in an NP program, and 2 of my classmates are also chiros, one of them is my old classmate from chiro school. This is not as uncommon as you might think. By the way we are all 3 male. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but personally I wouldn't see NP or PA is a mere lateral move from chiropractor. Good luck to you.
    Nola009, BPerez32, OncRNMichelle, and 2 others like this.


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