Difference btwn a BS+RN and BSN?

  1. What is the difference between a BS degree + ADN(RN) degree 20 some years later vs. a BS degree + BSN (2 BS degrees, one of them in a non nursing related field)?

    Does it make sense for me to enter BSN program (if I already have a BS) or should I look for an AND/RN program in addition to my BS?

    Would there be different options for a career in mgmt & furthering my nursing education?

    I have been accepted to 2yr tradional BSN program and will be 50 yo when I graduate. Have been on waiting list for ADN program in community college for 2 years already without even a hint or mention of a start date .

    Thanks for your opinion.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   RN 4 U
    I think I understand your question. Are you asking why get a BSN in nursing if you already have a BS. If so it makes more sense to me to just get another Bachelors degree rather than just an associates. I too have my 1st bachelors in a non nursing field, and went back to get my bachelors in nursing, so i have 2 bachelors. It's just two bachelors degrees. You have more job and advancement opportunties with a bachelors degree in nursing than you do having an assoc. Plus if you already have a bachelors in a non nursing field you could possibily get into an accelerated program like i did to get your bachelor's. All that means is less time to acquire your bachelors in nursing because the general credits that you already took for your first degree will count towards your nursing bachelor's degree. So yes, there a more management, leadership opportunities for bachelor degree holders and you will be able to enter into advance nursing career fields with your bachelors such as research, educator, nursing anesthesia, etc. all require a bachelors degree.
    Last edit by RN 4 U on Jan 10, '07 : Reason: more info.
  4. by   K os
    Thanks RN 4 U -

    Yes you did understand my question. The difference between the traditional and accelerated BSN programs at my intended university is 19 vs. 24 mos. Shorter time btwn semesters, not fewer classes. I thought at my ripe ol' age I could use the xtra time btwn semesters.

    Thanks again, Lisa
  5. by   RN 4 U
    Yeah, I did the accelerated program and boy it was accelerated I think the whole time which was 18 month we only had 1 week off the entire time. If i had the time i would have opted for the longer time b/t semesters but i had a deadline to meet. Good luck!
  6. by   ZASHAGALKA
    A BSN is a bach nursing degree. An ADN is a non-bach nursing degree.

    I'm not trying to be obtuse, but it's that simple.

    A non-BSN bach degree means little in nursing. You have a BSN, or not. Your degrees in other fields do not directly translate to nursing.

    You can get some credit, such as in 'clincal ladders' for a non-nursing bach. However, the advantages such as in administrative positions etc. where BSN is preferred normally means BSN, not RN+BS.

    RN+BS = ADN. BSN=BSN.

    Sorry. That's my experience. I have an ADN and a bach degree in Biology.

    Look at an Accelerated program that will translate your bach to a BSN.

    Quote from RN 4 U
    So yes, there a more management, leadership opportunities for bachelor degree holders and you will be able to enter into advance nursing career fields with your bachelors such as research, educator, nursing anesthesia, etc. all require a bachelors degree.
    All these fields mentioned above normally require a BSN, not just a non-nursing bach degree.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Last edit by ZASHAGALKA on Jan 10, '07
  7. by   K os
    "A non-BSN bach degree means little in nursing. You have a BSN, or not. Your degrees in other fields do not directly translate to nursing."


    ZASHAGALKA, more succinctly put, that was exactly my question!

    Thanks for the info.
  8. by   Katnip
    Either way, if you got that BS 20 years ago you'll probably have to retake some of the sciences.

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