Catholic hospitals-yes or no? - page 3

what would working in a catholic hospital be like? is there any reason to be concerned about the atmosphere in one? i have a job offer and have heard some negative things about catholic... Read More

  1. by   tvccrn
    Quote from hogan4736
    Religious bias has no place in a hospital...
    It does if the hospital is run by catholics, baptists, etc. It's their hospital and they can do what they want with it.

    However, I happen to love where I work. So much so, that when I moved from here to out east and discovered that he!!hole called Boston, I couldn't wait to get back.

    A lot of the higher-ups here know that I'm Wiccan and I have been asked some very intelligent and discussion-provoking questions by them. I am not treated any differently and neither are the patients. There is a big push here to respect our patients and their culture.

    tvccrn
  2. by   redding-er-rn
    I work in a Catholic hospital and find no difference between them and Baptist or other Protestant organizations. My corporation is managed by the nuns but healthcare is viewed basically as a "business" We provide a ministry and provide care for the underserved and uninsured or underinsured as well as the insured. The quality of care is the same regardless of the situation. Our goal is basically to be the facility of choice for the community.
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]i've never worked in a catholic hospital, but i did a travel contract in an adventist hospital. it was a beautiful, friendly facility. the folks there were nice and they didn't force religion. there were twice daily prayers, but they were easy enough to ignore if you weren't into it, and soothing if you were.

    i've had a few opportunities to work at catholic hospitals, but never did. when i moved to a new city in the 80s, i had interviews at two catholic and a methodist hospitals. on the day i arrived for my interview at the methodist hospital, the anti abortionists were picketing in front of the building. i ran the gauntlet of picketers with signs and grisley pictures -- you know the kind -- to get inside for my interview. when i got to hr, the president of the hospital wanted to meet the person who had wanted to work there badly enough to brave the anti abortionists. he shared his conviction that in order for there to be a choice for women, there had to be a facility that provided abortions. at that moment, i knew there was no question about where i was going to work. i believe in choice, and if there is going to be a choice, we need to support those facilities that ensure it.

    i have no doubt that catholic facilities can be wonderful places to work. but there are certain services that they don't offer, and women who have no choice but to use those hospitals are denied those services. anyone who doesn't share my beliefs may be really happy and fulfilled working at a catholic facility and i don't begrudge them that. for myself, though, i chose not to work there.
  4. by   KerenRN
    I work for a Catholic hospital and I believe the atmosphere can definitely be intrusive at times, especially for a person with beliefs such as I have- I am neither Catholic nor Christian. There are only two major hospitals in my area and they are both owned by "the sisters". Recently I was given a "mission statement" to sign. It included specifics of religion such as "following in the path of Christ" and upholding "Christian values". If you are uncomfortable with working in this type of atmosphere and are unable to ignore all the "plus signs" it probably isn't the best place to accept a job offer.... Luckily I was allowed to sign the statement after adding my own notations/feelings. I really didn't want to sign it at all - there is no religious requirement to work at this facility... but that is another issue...

    As for the pay, I hadn't ever thought that I might be donating some of my paycheck to jesus without even knowing it! I'm going to have to think about that one for a while!
  5. by   elcue
    Ruby said it all very well. I simply cannot work for an institution that does not support reproductive freedom of choice. I just feel I have to put my money where my mouth is on that, though I know my stance will certainly not change anything. It depends what's important to you. Everyone has to stand for something, and for me that is one issue where I cannot compromise. Be true to your own values. If you have no serious objections to the philosophies of an institution, then whether you are a "member" shouldn't affect your potential satisfaction working there. Good luck, whatever you decide. Linda
  6. by   hogan4736
    Quote from tvccrn
    It does if the hospital is run by catholics, baptists, etc. It's their hospital and they can do what they want with it...tvccrn
    Your point is semantically incorrect...You describe a form of ethnocentricity which differs from bias...



    Fanatic fundamentalism, and fundamentalism is, by definition, fanatic; is not in any way spiritual. Fundamentalism is entirely a political and social phenomenon hiding behind an utterly false simulacrum of religion.

    yes they can do what they want, but should respect other religions/cultures...
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from hogan4736
    Your point is semantically incorrect...You describe a form of ethnocentricity which differs from bias...

    Fanatic fundamentalism, and fundamentalism is, by definition, fanatic; is not in any way spiritual. Fundamentalism is entirely a political and social phenomenon hiding behind an utterly false simulacrum of religion.

    yes they can do what they want, but should respect other religions/cultures...
    And YOUR point is equally semantically incorrect.

    You play with the definitions of fundamentalism, fanaticism, AND spiritual in such a short passage. Those are YOUR definitions, not semantically correct ones. Show me any unbiased source of language that uses fanatic to define fundamentalism, or that uses spiritual as an antonym to fundamentalism.

    And then you dismiss the religiosity of others based solely on a purely semantical umbrella of such mis-definitions.

    You describe these things as political and social phenomenom but your take on these very things are a considered political and social viewpoint.

    Finally a treatise on respecting the religion and cultures of others while you simultaneously dismiss the very same in a large group of people. "THEY" should respect the religion and culture of others but "THEY" are "an utterly false simulacrum of religion." The 'semantics' of your last statement lie in stark contrast to everything else you mentioned. Or, if you'll excuse the pun, practice what you preach.

    Religious based hospitals serve a need in most communities. You don't have to be Catholic, or in fact, religious at all to work in a Catholic hospital. You do have to actually respect the religion and culture of others, namely, your employer, to do so. But respect is different then adherence.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  8. by   hogan4736
    "You play with the definitions of fundamentalism, fanaticism, AND spiritual in such a short passage."

    For such a short passage, it certainly inspired a long-winded reply!

    Look Tim,

    My point was and is: religious bias has no place in a hospital and health care...

    Irrespective of one's beliefs, patient care is paramount to anything else...

    If someone wants the morning after pill, prescribe it for her...Better she takes it, than give birth to an unwanted child who grows up knowing this...

    Nurses and docs should not be so naive to think that their beliefs transcend those of the patient and health care as a whole...
  9. by   hogan4736
    "Religious based hospitals serve a need in most communities"



    I am catholic, was raised catholic, and despise its inherent judgement that it preaches to little children, in school...

    XXXXX

    But we cannot judge!
    Last edit by sirI on Sep 21, '06 : Reason: TOS
  10. by   tvccrn
    Quote from hogan4736
    Your point is semantically incorrect...You describe a form of ethnocentricity which differs from bias...



    Fanatic fundamentalism, and fundamentalism is, by definition, fanatic; is not in any way spiritual. Fundamentalism is entirely a political and social phenomenon hiding behind an utterly false simulacrum of religion.

    yes they can do what they want, but should respect other religions/cultures...
    You conveniently left out the rest of my post where I said those very words you have in your post....

    Quote from tvccrn
    I am not treated any differently and neither are the patients. There is a big push here to respect our patients and their culture.
    tvccrn
  11. by   randismom
    why should the fact the facility is owned and managed by any religious affiliation make any difference on the patient care you provide.
    as a catholic, I have worked in many facilities including the Seventh day adventist organization for 7 years. There were no changes in patient care. The only overt change noted for the employees was that the cafeteria was vegetarian. As in any organization, mutual respect of the supervisors, management and staff should be a given. Whether their titles are Mr. Ms. or Father or Sister should make no difference in your professional behaviour.
  12. by   Pompom
    I worked agency for 4.5 yrs. in a catholic hospital, it was the best hospital in the city. Unfortunately a large hospital just bought them so it is down hill now.
  13. by   hogan4736
    Quote from tvccrn
    It does if the hospital is run by catholics, baptists, etc. It's their hospital and they can do what they want with it.

    However, I happen to love where I work. So much so, that when I moved from here to out east and discovered that he!!hole called Boston, I couldn't wait to get back.

    A lot of the higher-ups here know that I'm Wiccan and I have been asked some very intelligent and discussion-provoking questions by them. I am not treated any differently and neither are the patients. There is a big push here to respect our patients and their culture.

    tvccrn
    okay, there it is...

    no harm meant, just responding to the first sentence in your post...

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