Anyone over 50 recently hired?

  1. 0
    Let's say within the last 6 months. Anyone? Just curious.
  2. 16 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Uh huh. Just as I thought.
  4. 0
    You post at 530pm CT & then make assumptions because no over 50 job seekers happened to see you post & failed to respond to you overnight?

    But the answer to your question is Yes. Actually, I know of 2 successful examples.
  5. 0
    Quote from MrChicagoRN
    You post at 530pm CT & then make assumptions because no over 50 job seekers happened to see you post & failed to respond to you overnight?

    But the answer to your question is Yes. Actually, I know of 2 successful examples.
    I'm 53 and I am wondering if my age is having a negative influence on me getting a job as a New Grad. I sometimes think that only cute young people are getting the new grad jobs these days. What I am most concerned is that it will take too many years for "nurse glut" to turn into "nursing shortage". I think it could take 5 to 10 years until they are needing nurses like they did before 2008 and by then I will be really be too old and certainly have forgotten what nursing even is. Its funny how life is, I made a carer change thinking I was getting into one of the most sought after professions to find out that I have to work harder than any other profession I had before in order to just get a foot on the door!
  6. 0
    Quote from marcos9999
    I'm 53 and I am wondering if my age is having a negative influence on me getting a job as a New Grad. I sometimes think that only cute young people are getting the new grad jobs these days.
    Are there transferable skills & experience from your previous field that you can turn into selling points?

    Perhaps it might be helpful to initially focus on settings that value maturity: Hospice, LTC, assisted living, home-care, etc

    Good luck.
  7. 0
    Are you asking only about new grads, or in general?

    I'm in my mid-50s, and just got hired into a great new job a few months ago (in an advanced practice subspecialty, though).
  8. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    Are you asking only about new grads, or in general?

    I'm in my mid-50s, and just got hired into a great new job a few months ago (in an advanced practice subspecialty, though).
    What kind of job did you get exactly? Where are you in the U.S.? I just feel like looking for a job at this moment here in the Bay Area (one of the worst places) is almost a complete waste of time, they are not hiring new grads period, and I do have good connections, my wife is a nurse of 25+ years and know lots of people, even with that on board is not working. If there is a rare new grad program there are 1000+ applicants that are fresher New Grads and are sharper than me. I am running out of ideas, maybe I'll start looking in the small rural hospitals, which are very far from the big centers and less people are willing to go there. I can relocate and maybe that's an advantage over the 30 something nurses who usually by then have hubbies and babies. Arrrrgggg...I'm not giving up but I sure feel like it sometimes.
  9. 1
    The reason I asked about whether the OP's question was specifically regarding new grads was because I'm not one; I'm an experienced advance practice nurse. These are hard times for new grads in general, and I've heard things are particularly bad in CA, so I sympathize with your position.

    If, as you mentioned, you can relocate, you might want to start looking for jobs "farther afield." I started looking nationally when it became obvious that I wasn't going to be able to get a good job anywhere near my permanent home, and relocated to another state to take my new position. Small rural hospitals can be great places to work (I started my career in one decades ago) -- you often get a much wider range of experience/opportunities, and the chance to take on more responsibility and exercise more independent judgment than you would as a new grad in larger hospitals. I also concur with MrChicago's suggestion about looking at alternative settings and roles that may place a greater value on maturity and "life experience."

    Best wishes for your job-hunting!
    MrChicagoRN likes this.
  10. 0
    The ONLY problem with someone over 50 is that they might not have the proper degree. I've seen a lot of diplomas of nursing lately (worthlses) and ASN (worthless). I've seen Advanced Practice Nurses get hired that are over 50 (and have the qualifications) and they're starting at 75-90K.
  11. 2
    Quote from trinnylax0484
    The ONLY problem with someone over 50 is that they might not have the proper degree. I've seen a lot of diplomas of nursing lately (worthlses) and ASN (worthless). I've seen Advanced Practice Nurses get hired that are over 50 (and have the qualifications) and they're starting at 75-90K.

    That's a rather meaningless generalization. The educational system is churning out thousands of Diploma/ASN graduates, most of whom are under 50.

    The advantage the over 40, over 50 non-BSN RN has is they've probably had a lot of time to complete their BSN (or beyond)

    I wouldn't call the diploma/ASN worthless. Depending on the local market & area of practice, that may serve them quite well. While I recommend folks get their BSN, there are & will continue to be, highly competent practitioners at that level.
    nursel56 and elkpark like this.


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