Aussie-isms - page 3

by Grace Oz 8,624 Views | 79 Comments

Ok, I'll start a thread too! :cool: In an effort to help our non -Aussies understand our lingo, I'll start a thread on our slang words and / or words that are parculiar, common, here in Aust. So everybody, get onboard & add... Read More


  1. 0
    LOL just read your post again. You must mean 'chook'

    This term refers to a hen, but can be used as 'term of endearment'
  2. 0
    Nakitamoon,
    post it on the UK thread & someone will know. "chuck" is a Northern english dialect word, rather than London, but is a term of endearment. "Hen" is used too, but usually in Scotland, and specifically female, where chuck is generic!
  3. 0
    And "Duck" is an affectionate name for a female in the Derby area!
  4. 0
    LOL! In short, travel 30 miles in any direction in the UK and the locals speak a different variety of English!
    (or is 30 miles too far?)
    I worked in East Anglia, and after a while even I could tell if someone was Norwich <the town> or Norfolk <the county>
  5. 0
    How true is this example of Aussie foreplay:
    " Hey, Sheila, wanna **** ?"
    "I do NOW, ya silver tongued devil!"
  6. 0
    CHUCK.... "Chuck the ball" as in THROW the ball.
    "Chuck it out" as in dispose of something.


    Another word for vomit here in Oz is; CHUNDER.
    PEWK is another.

    BONZA: as in Beaut, nice, good, great terrific etc.

    Keep em coming folks....
    Cheers,
    Grace :kiss
  7. 1
    how about a 'port' as in schoolbag..

    or 'but' at the end of each sentence!
    nyapa likes this.
  8. 0
    What a great thread
    Then there is spew - again vomit (isnt it awful we focus on this)
    Bloke loved your link

    At the moment we still laugh every time the tennis commentator refer to the cahnging of the tennis balls as
    'Serving with new balls"

    A couple that are reall old as in my parents that are in their 80's
    Are
    As busy as a one arm paper hanger
    if you ask what are you making=
    a wigwam for a gooses bridal - -- now come to think of that that may not be Aussie - please correct me

    There is probably heaps more and we will have to conitue to add them
    Hope you are keeping track - or are you writing a book Irae
  9. 0
    I have used some terms here that maybe percular to us l dont know things such as
    Rabbiting on or waffling on
    Do these make sense to non aussies - if not it generally means (well at least to go on to long about a subjct and not get to the point)
    Another expression that could be used is to have
    Verbal diahorrea.
  10. 0
    Flat out, like a lizard drinking.
    Onya! As in good on you, use both postivily and negativly
    Not all the sheep are grazing in the top paddock. Meaning a little thick.
    Thick as a short plank, as in, well, stupid.
    Aussie salute, waving flies away from face
    Get stuffed, get lost, It's stuffed, its broken.
    Wallaby Teds brother'd As in Roo-ted.

    How cool, did you notice we can say "root" and it doesn't get beeped? Tee hee!!


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