unprofessional behavior in RN community - page 2

by miphillli 16,819 Views | 107 Comments

:nurse: I work in a small rural hospital in Nebraska,you would think the nurses here would be as professional as anywhere,or more so,wrong-wrong-wrong...we have some younger 22-30 year olds that use the f word and others I don't... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Farkinott
    unprofessional behavior in RN community
    "I work in a small rural hospital in Nebraska,you would think the nurses here would be as professional as anywhere,or more so,wrong-wrong-wrong...we have some younger 22-30 year olds that use the f word and others I don't care to think of,at the drop of their hat..they nit-pick and make fun of others all the time...our unit manager is well aware of the problem and I think she may have had a few words with them but their behavior has not changed...does anyone out their have a solution???" (quote from original post)


    Who is nitpicking???????
    farkinott, they were nit-picking and make fun of others all the time... . is that acceptable?
  2. 0
    Quote from Farkinott
    unprofessional behavior in RN community
    "I work in a small rural hospital in Nebraska,you would think the nurses here would be as professional as anywhere,or more so,wrong-wrong-wrong...we have some younger 22-30 year olds that use the f word and others I don't care to think of,at the drop of their hat..they nit-pick and make fun of others all the time...our unit manager is well aware of the problem and I think she may have had a few words with them but their behavior has not changed...does anyone out their have a solution???" (quote from original post)


    Who is nitpicking???????
    Foul language in front of pts/families is not a nitpicking complaint. Respect of your pts and their families is most important. A nurse can be sharp as a tack, but if she verbally comes off like a street walker, then she doesn't leave a very good impression.
    Making fun of others, well, that is simply immaturity and has nothing to do with age. It's not just in nursing either, it's running rampant all over this country in all walks of life.
    No solution to offer unfortunately.
  3. 0
    Interesting you should use the word "ladies" in discussing this matter.

    How would you define "professional"? And are we talking here about professionalism, or being "lady-like"?

    I'm not defending someone's bad behavior or language. But I've found that nurses often talk about professionalism without defining it.

    Jim Huffman, RN
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    Don't cuss. Don't like to hear foul language but I am old enough to have heard most every cuss word invented. Don't like gossip. Too busy doing my job. Do appreciate a smile, understand when someone needs to let off stress. A few minutes in the lunch/break room can do the trick. Or a kind word or action from a coworker can help. Remember teamwork and team effort is a key to a good work situation.
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    Quote from barefootlady
    Don't cuss. Don't like to hear foul language but I am old enough to have heard most every cuss word invented. Don't like gossip. Too busy doing my job. Do appreciate a smile, understand when someone needs to let off stress. A few minutes in the lunch/break room can do the trick. Or a kind word or action from a coworker can help. Remember teamwork and team effort is a key to a good work situation.
    you would think this would be the most basic of concepts, yes?
    i'd work with you in a heartbeat.

    leslie
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    Most often, I've seen this behavior (the reason for the thread) at the nurses station (or the so-called kitchen where the coffee is, and a second place (other than the nurses station) where nurses congregate). I miss out on most of the cursing, badmouthing, back stabbing etc. by not being at the nurses station. I'm still new, and far too busy charting, assessing/evaluating my patients, preparing the meds/ivs/tube-feeding pumps, and putting the ventilator tube back on the trach (for that matter, suctioning or cleaning the trach itself) to be hanging out there, listening to the abuse. Sorry.
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    How about next time they curse, you tell them to their face how offended you are by their language. Then document it in a letter to the manager.

    There are going to be gossipers and cliques wherever you go. Best to not participate and just mind your business and do your work.

    In defense of younger people, the worst offender I ever saw of being a foul mouthed, instigator and gossip mongrol was a 50something grandmother I worked with for a year and a half while she did a contract. Was so glad to see that busybody leave.
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    Some of our newer nurses are the same way. The med students and residents absolutely LOVE them, especially the guys. They think these girls are very cool and it almost seems like the girls are doing it to attract these guys. I think it's very unprofessional. Some of them will use the intercom to call a resident or attending to report lab results and stuff - and will say things like, "Baby Smith had a really sh***y blood gas, perfusion is cr***y, etc." With parents on the unit sometimes!!! :angryfire

    There is one charge nurse who always keeps her cool about her and is extremely professional. But once in a very great while, when things go absolutely crazy, we'll hear her say the f-word. When she starts swearing, we know we are in sooooo much trouble!!! But that's understandable. Using swear words as adjectives on a daily basis is not.
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    I hate to mention this--I'm sure I'm not the only one with this experience, but.....

    Bad behavior is everywhere. And smiling really pretty while "being bad" doesn't dilute it one bit.

    Not everyone is going to be well-mannered, good-natured and happy... what gets me is when the well-mannered, good-natured and happy are so outnumbered that they are systematically driven away.

    That's a real shame.
  10. 0
    Quote from Gompers
    "Baby Smith had a really sh***y blood gas, perfusion is cr***y, etc." With parents on the unit sometimes!!! :angryfire

    There is one charge nurse who always keeps her.

    I imagine this nurse looking at a blood gas report and deciphering the pH, PCO2, and HCO3. That takes skill, yet she uses the word "sh***" which almost negates all her intelligence that she displayed deciphering the blood gas.


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